daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 14th, 2007, 06:38 PM   #461
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

11/14



























__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 15th, 2007, 04:10 PM   #462
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

Waterfront green plan a winner with jury
14 November 2007
South China Morning Post

A team of four young Hong Kong architects whose design for the Central waterfront has a "green carpet" that integrates with the towering metropolis was named winner of a planning competition yesterday.

Picked from 82 entries from around the world, the jury said the team's submission was a bold vision that challenged present development practice and envisaged a Hong Kong with more breathing space.

The Planning Department said the future design of the Central waterfront, expected to be announced early next year, would take into account the results of the competition.

Called the "Amphibian Carpet", the winning design sees the hard-edged city waterfront replaced with a mix of wetland and coastal development.

It envisages a massive grassland and green "canopy" spaces covering most of the waterfront and environs, connecting the area to the city centre.

Lagoons and a wetland with diverse species of mangroves and wildlife would grace the coastline.

But the team said the waterfront area would not be reserved for conservation only - entertainment and commercial activities would also be encouraged in shopping malls, water theatres, farmers' markets, subway stations and cinemas.

"I am surprised at the result. We joined the competition because of our passion for Hong Kong," said Bart Chui Yee-wai, from the winning team.

Mr Chui and his team members graduated as architects from the University of Hong Kong a few years ago and now work in the United States.

He said the team wanted to give something back to the city and offer residents more choices and a better quality of life.

"Concrete buildings with glass curtain walls do not necessarily belong in Central," Mr Chui said, adding that a mixture of rural and urban activities on the waterfront could bring new forms of development.

Jury member Essy Baniassad, a professor in the architectural department at Chinese University, said most jury members picked the design because it featured large open spaces between the harbour and the commercial hub, a concept both bold and rare under current planning policy.

Vincent Ng Wing-shun, another jury member and former vice-president of the Hong Kong Institute of Architects, said the design was the most innovative and courageous among the four finalists.

"It brings nature to the hustling busy areas and offers us breathing space," Mr Ng said.

Competition organiser Designing Hong Kong Harbour District awarded a HK$450,000 prize to the team. Finalists' models will be displayed at the International Finance Centre concourse until Monday.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 16th, 2007, 06:42 PM   #463
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

Priority on harbour in move to cut density
Review will first focus on crammed districts

16 October 2007
South China Morning Post

The government will give priority to sites along the harbour in its upcoming review of building density, the development chief said yesterday.

Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor also reassured lawmakers that reducing development density above Nam Cheong and Yuen Long stations would have no cost implications for the railway company to be formed from the merger of rail operations of the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation and the MTR Corporation.

Discussing the chief executive's policy initiatives in a Legco meeting yesterday, the secretary for development said the government would soon review the density of the whole city, as set out by Donald Tsang Yam-kuen in his policy address last week.

Mr Tsang said on Wednesday the government would review the outline zoning plans of various districts and, where justified, revise planning parameters to lower the development density.

He also said the government would review the approved property development projects above the Nam Cheong and Yuen Long stations on the West Rail line, with a view to lowering their development densities.

Mrs Lam said more than half of Hong Kong's 108 outline zoning plans did not have planning parameters specifying heights, plot ratios and maximum gross floor areas - key components in controlling density.

She said priority should be given in the review to sites along the harbour and areas that already have a high density.

But the minister said no target date or timetable had been set to complete the review, which had already been started - for example, in North Point.

In the case of the planned property development at Yuen Long station, Mrs Lam said the project had been approved by the Town Planning Board in early 2005. Now that Mr Tsang had announced a cut in density at the station, the government would review the development plan with the MTR Corp.

The district council would also be consulted and the government would have to seek approval from the Town Planning Board.

"The review will reduce government revenue, but the railway company will not suffer financially since it only acts as a government agent in the development."

Mrs Lam also stressed that new-development density in the northern New Territories would remain low to maintain the area's rural character.

Three years ago the government listed 12 sites in the New Territories with high conservation value for limited development and invited proposals from the private sector, but no project has been started.

Mrs Lam said her bureau would work with the Environment Bureau to revitalise as soon as possible the proposal for developing the sites under public-private partnership.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 24th, 2007, 05:48 AM   #464
Aboveday
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Unidentified
Posts: 1,177
Likes (Received): 11







Oct 2007.
Source : Hong Kong Government.
Aboveday no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2007, 04:07 AM   #465
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

Joint approach for new-look waterfront
Public-private partnerships proposed to manage harbour sites

26 November 2007
South China Morning Post

Developers will be asked to design and manage some waterfront areas under a public-private partnership model proposed by the government, a top official says.

The Central and Wan Chai reclamation areas could be the first to be managed under the arrangement, the official said, adding that designs for the new Central waterfront would be put on show in January for public comment.

Harbourfront Enhancement Committee chairman Lee Chack-fan welcomed the idea, but committee members said it must be studied carefully to see what financial incentives should be offered to developers.

Permanent Secretary for Development Raymond Young Lap-moon, said the government was looking for a new way to manage waterfront areas to enhance their diversity and vibrancy.

Areas under government control were not linked well and lacked vibrancy, he said. "Instead of asking various departments to manage the new open spaces, we are thinking of inviting private groups to do it."

He said the groups could be developers, or developers in partnership with NGOs. Certain conditions would be imposed. For example, the areas would have to be revitalised with activities and landmarks and should be open to the public.

A similar idea had proved successful at the Avenue of Stars in Tsim Sha Tsui, he said. The promenade, next to the New World Centre, was built by New World Development at a cost of HK$40 million in 2004.

The developer was commissioned by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department to manage the promenade for 20 years. It said the attraction now drew more than 800,000 visitors a month.

Mr Young said the Harbourfront Enhancement Committee would be consulted on the new management model. If endorsed by the committee, it would first be used for the Central and Wan Chai reclamation areas.

He said the Planning Department was preparing models of designs for the Central waterfront, to be released for a second-round public consultation in January. People will be asked to vote for their preferred option.

Waterfront areas are currently not managed by a single department; responsibility goes to the department that takes ownership of the land. And areas owned by private developers may not be open to the public.

Professor Lee said some waterfront areas in private hands would remain closed and lifeless unless the developers were brought into improvement schemes. He said the new model would allow for increased flexibility and resources.

Committee member Andrew Thomson, representing the Business Environment Council, said overseas examples should be studied to ensure the open space was an asset to the community and would not be overwhelmed by development.

He said developers would not be interested in the scheme unless projects were financially rewarding, so they might seek to add commercial and retail development to generate revenue for maintenance.

"It is still premature to say whether [the new model] is preferential. We will look at all alternatives, including setting up an agency or a committee for management in the long run."

Christine Loh Kung-wai, chairwoman of the Society for Protection of the Harbour, said the society supported a well-designed harbourfront, but whether it was interested in managing the areas would depend on the details of the scheme.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2007, 06:50 PM   #466
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

Single authority can give harbour back to people
26 November 2007
South China Morning Post

A natural treasure such as Victoria Harbour deserves to be handled with forethought, care and innovation to ensure that it can be enjoyed to the fullest by the people of Hong Kong. Inadequate vision by successive administrations has prevented this, and there is little chance of such an ideal coming to pass unless a single government entity is put in charge of the process.

Unfortunately, the government does not seem to appreciate the importance of creating a harbour authority to draft and manage a plan for our foremost asset. The idea has been rejected as being too complicated. Perhaps officials are daunted by the prospect of having to reform the compartmentalised way in which numerous departments are currently involved in managing the foreshore. Until and unless they muster the will to cut through the bureaucratic maze, the public will have to put up with a piecemeal approach to beautify the waterfront.

As we report today, a top government official has reavealed the government is instead considering a public-private partnership model of development for some parts of the waterfront. There is merit in this idea, but it would be even better if it was part of an overall harbour use strategy. In itself, the model's impact will be limited. Nor does such an arrangement always work as effectively as might be hoped. The Avenue of Stars on the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront is the example being pointed to, and there is no doubt that this has turned what had been a mere paved waterside walkway into a lively draw for tourists and locals alike.

Where there was once just a pavement and railing, there now is a place of homage to the Hong Kong entertainment industry. Interspersed among the statues and handprints are ice-cream stalls and souvenir stalls among which to browse while enjoying views of the harbour and Hong Kong Island.

The scene would be complete if, instead of just one or two cafes, the promenade was lined with restaurants offering al fresco dining and a lively atmosphere, as can be found along stretches of Sydney's harbour and San Francisco's bay.

There is occasion when the public-private partnership idea works well. The restaurant in Hong Kong Park is such an example: From its tables, the tranquility, greenery and fountains of the inner-city oasis can be fully appreciated. Applied to the harbourside with an eye to public access and enjoyment, this is a worthy way forward. But it is not in itself the solution to making amends for keeping so much of the harbourfront out of bounds for public use.

This can only be done through the formulation of an overall strategic development plan. With the government owning all but a fraction of the foreshore, this can be achieved - as long as it is put in the hands of a single authority.

For now, only a fraction of the harbourside - the length of the Central to Wan Chai reclamation - is in the government's sights. With a consultation process to start in January with the unveiling of development models, authorities are creating the right environment. But it must go further.

The Protection of the Harbour Ordinance refers to the waterway as a "special public asset" and a "natural heritage of Hong Kong people". If the spirit is to be followed, there has to be a broader vision backed by strong management.

Creating a specific government agency will prove authorities are genuine about giving the harbour back to the people of Hong Kong.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 30th, 2007, 07:28 AM   #467
FM 2258
Registered User
 
FM 2258's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Austin
Posts: 5,436
Likes (Received): 611

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aboveday View Post



Oct 2007.
Source : Hong Kong Government.
I bet prices for that land are outrageously expensive.
FM 2258 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 30th, 2007, 07:51 AM   #468
abskess
Mega Davao Area, Phils.
 
abskess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: DiadabaDAVAO
Posts: 706
Likes (Received): 7

HK s really a great place....
__________________
DAVAO Where Your Dreams Thrive
Ten Tribes, One Vibe
Bajadization For Real
abskess no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 3rd, 2007, 12:56 AM   #469
Sexas
Whole Other Country
 
Sexas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 735
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
I bet prices for that land are outrageously expensive.
Sure it will be, but they are only for parks and open space....thank God.
__________________
Communication is Inevitable, Irreversible & Unrepeatable. Be Warn!
Sexas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 11th, 2007, 06:32 PM   #470
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

12/9



__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 22nd, 2007, 07:03 PM   #471
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

12/22



__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 07:06 PM   #472
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

12/27











__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2008, 09:41 PM   #473
Mr. Met
Registered User
 
Mr. Met's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 366
Likes (Received): 3

I heard that this project is being reviewed for its environmental impact, is construction continuing and when will the project be done?
Mr. Met no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 19th, 2008, 09:58 PM   #474
EricIsHim
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,397
Likes (Received): 28

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Met View Post
I heard that this project is being reviewed for its environmental impact, is construction continuing and when will the project be done?
What you heard isn't true, there is no review for environmental impact or anything.

The reclamation itself is scheduled to be completed in 2009, with all infrastructures constructed in the following three years. So it will be another four to five before what was drawn in the rendering becomes reality.
__________________
EricIsHim
My PhotoBucket
EricIsHim no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 22nd, 2008, 04:43 PM   #475
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

Central rethink shows government is listening
16 January 2008
South China Morning Post

Development around Victoria Harbour remains the city's most contentious planning issue. None has been so hotly debated as the Central reclamation. It is the development that will, more than any other, define Hong Kong. As we report today, the government has revised its proposals ahead of another round of public consultation. It appears from what has been revealed by a senior official that the changes are heading in the right direction. They are bound to reignite debate, which is not a bad thing.

The government claims to be listening to public concerns about high-density development. In his policy speech the chief executive promised a planning review to lower densities and create a better living environment. There is evidence of that in planning proposals for the harbourfront land where the former North Point estate once stood. More evidence is to be found in the rethink of plans for the Central waterfront. This is to be welcomed. The harbour belongs to all the people.

But we need to see more detail before we can be sure the government has got it right. This must be done for the benefit of present and future generations.

The city stands on the threshold of landmark harbourfront developments that provide an opportunity to reshape our city for the better. They include the government headquarters on the Tamar site fronting the reclamation, the old Kai Tak airport site and the West Kowloon Cultural District.

The North Point redevelopment plan tackles public concerns about high-density development that blocks air flow, raises urban temperatures and aggravates pollution and leaves little public open space. The response included lower height limits, air-flow corridors between buildings and reduced floor area.

The Central waterfront presents a more complex challenge. The new proposals are a response to public demand for a more vibrant streetscape than allowed by the scale of commercial, retail and hotel development in the current plan. Overall commercial development will be reduced and large buildings split into smaller blocks.

Happily, that includes a "groundscraper", an ill-conceived substitute for a commercial high-rise building that would have covered 5 hectares. This will be divided into a various configurations of blocks from which the public can choose a preference. The new plan will propose height limits and plot ratios for six sites to be sold off for commercial development.

The two proposals also include possible new homes for Queen's Pier and the Star Ferry clock tower, either at the original sites or on the new waterfront. The government official cited public support for moving the pier to the new harbourfront as a working public pier, an option that would avoid construction problems in leaving it where it is. This may go some way towards easing public concerns about the removal of the pier. But under either proposal Queen's Pier would lose much of its heritage value because it would no longer be part of the waterfront, including the now-demolished Star Ferry pier, with which it is historically associated. Since it has no architectural value, neither proposal makes much sense.

Broadly, however, the revised plan is encouraging. We trust the fine detail will not disappoint when it is released for the second public consultation. The first consultation was instrumental in bringing about the improvements. Hopefully, the government will continue listening to the people.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 22nd, 2008, 05:14 PM   #476
Rachmaninov
Registered User
 
Rachmaninov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
Posts: 3,188
Likes (Received): 24

I sometimes think that the government has always listened to the people. It's just that the people haven't listened to the government.
__________________
Rachmaninov no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 28th, 2008, 05:23 PM   #477
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

Fishermen's temple gets the nod over HK$1b hotel and arts centre
27 January 2008
South China Morning Post

Plans for a HK$1 billion hotel and arts complex next to Victoria Park are set to be thrown out under a revised blueprint for the area's harbourfront.

Instead, planners have earmarked the site as a terrestrial home for a floating Tin Hau temple - now housed in the Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter - where fishermen and their families have worshipped for more than 60 years.

The move, part of the revised Wan Chai North Outline Zoning Plan, has been hailed by conservationists as a landmark decision that gives added weight to the wishes of local residents and public use of the harbourfront.

Wharf Estates, the company's development arm, applied to build the boutique hotel and arts centre in partnership with the Fringe Club and Hong Kong Arts Centre on the derelict A-King Shipyard site at the typhoon shelter's eastern end in March last year. In November, it revised its plans, cutting the hotel's height and reducing the density of the complex, following objections.

But the revised blueprint, which has been approved by the Town Planning Board, changed the permitted uses of the site from entertainment and leisure - on which Wharf's plan was based - to government, institution and community use and earmarked the site for the fishermen's temple.

Mabel Lam Mei-po, an assistant manager with Wheelock Properties, Wharf's parent company, said it was disappointed by the changes, which also removed permission for bridges linking the site to Victoria Park and Tin Hau. She said the company would continue to lobby for the Victoria Park complex.

"The rezoning proposal will create a cul-de-sac," she said. "It will lead to crowd-control problems during special occasions, such as fireworks displays. It will be very difficult for the area to be vibrant."

A spokeswoman for the board said the new concept for the A-King site came out of an "extensive public engagement exercise" that followed the Court of Final Appeal's landmark ruling against harbour reclamation unless there is "overriding public need", and planners proposing the changes to meet objections to the existing zoning plan.

Jennifer Chow Kit-bing, district councillor for Victoria Park, said: "The vast majority of residents in my constituency would like the waterfront to be used purely as a leisure and recreation area. I am very pleased the Town Planning Board supports this view."

Poon Kam-tin, chairman of the Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter Mutual Aid Committee, which represents boat dwellers, said: "We have been calling for a new home for the floating temple for more than 15 years. Our wish is to relocate the temple on land to avoid the possibility of accidents. It will also help to preserve the history of the typhoon shelter."

Winston Chu Ka-sun, adviser to the Society for the Protection of the Harbour, said: "It is very encouraging that the board now listens to public objections and has effectively turned down a major commercial project proposed by a powerful developer in favour of community interests."

Conservancy Association chairwoman Betty Ho Siu-fong said: "It sends a very strong signal the government is now committed to opening up the harbourfront for public use, rather than making money."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2008, 12:27 AM   #478
herenthere
I♥H.K.
 
herenthere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC/紐約市/Nueva York
Posts: 427
Likes (Received): 70

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Fishermen's temple gets the nod over HK$1b hotel and arts centre
__________________
Proponent of Mass Transit, Livable Streets, and Progressive Politics
herenthere no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2008, 06:15 PM   #479
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

Hung Hom site plan reduces height, density
17 January 2008
South China Morning Post

A further reduction in building density and height has been suggested for two waterfront development sites in Hung Hom by the government - the third move to cut development intensity on prime sites this month.

The proposal was welcomed by a green group and a Town Planning Board member yesterday.

But the revision is expected to result in a drop of government revenue of about HK$1.8 billion from an original estimate of about HK$8 billion, surveyor Charles Chan Chiu-kwok said.

Under the proposal, the development density of an area at Hung Luen Road would be capped at a plot ratio of four instead of the original plot ratio of six.

The 3 hectares of land - earmarked for a hotel, office buildings and shops - would also be divided into two lots to facilitate a gradation of building heights towards the waterfront. No buildings on the site would be taller than 75 metres - or about 30 storeys.

In an adjacent residential site, a further reduction in density to 4.5 was proposed - down from the original 7.5. Building heights at the residential site would be lowered from 120 metres to 100 metres.

The Planning Department said the proposals aimed to reduce excessive building and achieve a gradation of building heights towards the harbourfront.

An air ventilation assessment was also carried out in the area.

Pedestrian boulevards were proposed as ventilation passageways, with a 20-metre-wide "visual corridor" at the central part of the site.

The government's suggestions revealed yesterday are more radical than the measures proposed by the Hung Hom District Study - undertaken by an independent consultant briefed with formulating a holistic district plan.

That proposes a plot ratio of six for the residential site and a single-site development for the comprehensive development area.

Engineer and Town Planning Board member, Greg Wong Chak-yan, said reduced building density at the site would improve ventilation.

"The 75-metre height restriction and pedestrian passageways will definitely improve air flow into the hinterland of Hung Hom, where relatively short buildings of 10 storeys stand," he said.

President of Green Sense, Roy Tam Hoi-pong said the proposal represented a significant improvement on development intensity.

"It is the second such amendment on the outline zoning plan of the waterfront area this month and we fully agree with it," he said.

But he urged the government to incorporate specific restrictions - such as the inclusion of passageways - in the conditions of sale developers must follow.

Surveyor Charles Chan estimated that the government would reap about HK$6.2 billion from the site under the new parameters.

He said the hotel development in Hung Hom would remain attractive, but the value of the residential development would be slightly affected because of the lowering of scale.

The amendments on the Hung Hom site came just two weeks after the Town Planning Board announced proposals to slash the density of a development on the former North Point Estate site by almost 70 per cent.

Drastic height and gross floor area reductions were included in the same government proposal.

The Development Bureau has said it also intends to split the controversial "groundscraper" planned for the Central harbourfront into small blocks, and set height restrictions and floor area limits.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 8th, 2008, 06:21 AM   #480
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17804

Temporary reclamation plan defended in court
6 February 2008
South China Morning Post

Temporary reclamation work for the Central-Wan Chai bypass will be carried out in four phases, with reclaimed land removed as each section of the road's tunnel is completed, a court has heard.

Details of the government's plans for reclaiming 8.3 hectares of seabed in and around Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter were outlined in the Court of First Instance yesterday.

The Society for the Protection of the Harbour is seeking a declaration in the judicial-review hearing that the government's temporary reclamation plans fall under the Protection of the Harbour Ordinance.

The ordinance established a presumption against all future reclamation of the harbour unless there was "an overriding public need" for the work that was supported by "cogent and convincing materials".

Government counsel Jat Sew-tong said boats moored in each section of the typhoon shelter - with up to 3.9 hectares of moorings affected at any one time - would be moved into a temporary typhoon shelter during the work.

A 4.2-hectare breakwater almost 500 metres from the shore, as well as two wave walls, would be built to protect the boats, including yachts from the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club, he told the court.

Mr Jat said the temporary reclamation was not subject to the ordinance because it would be carried out strictly for building the road tunnel and not for forming land - the definition of reclamation in the statute.

Nevertheless, he said both the temporary reclamation and the bypass plan had been drawn up with the ordinance in mind and the "overriding public need" for the road was not disputed.

The method for building the tunnel had been chosen because it involved the least permanent reclamation and everyone involved had sought to minimise the extent of reclamation - both temporary and permanent.

"The tunnel option is clearly the option that would serve best to protect and preserve the harbour," Mr Jat said. He called on Mr Justice Michael Hartmann to make a reference in his ruling to the "strong public interest in progressing with the project".

The breakwater was part of the work, and evidence from the Marine Department indicated there were no viable alternative moorings at other typhoon shelters within the harbour, he said.

But Anthony Neoh, SC, counsel for the society, said the project report on the bypass had stated that the "immersed tunnel" method, which did not involve temporary reclamation, could also be used in the typhoon shelter.

"We have a very incomplete public consultation in relation to the method of construction," he said. "And the society remains unconvinced that the breakwater is the only viable alternative. The yacht club not only has moorings on Middle Island, but also in Sai Kung.

"The government has not complied with its own procedures, which the public have a legitimate expectation to be followed. What is needed is a survey of all the options."

Mr Justice Hartmann reserved his decision on the case.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu