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Old April 27th, 2006, 05:17 PM   #161
Rachmaninov
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Huh??? So now it's 120,000 sq. metres instead of 60,000??

Weird...
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Old April 28th, 2006, 02:52 AM   #162
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Activist quits `useless' post on harbor committee
Leslie Kwoh
Hong Kong Standard
Friday, April 28, 2006

Outspoken environmental activist Paul Zimmerman has resigned from the government-appointed Harbourfront Enhancement Committee, saying the administration's refusal to look at the "big picture" in terms of harborfront preservation has rendered his past two years of membership "useless."

"I've spent a lot of time on the committee, and I think it's time wasted," he told members at the committee's quarterly meeting Thursday.

"There are other ways for me to address the issue [of harbor preservation] that would cost me less time and would be more effective than the many hours I've spent here."

Due to a lack of leadership, the two- year-old committee had failed to work as a "proper interface" between the public and the government, he said.

For instance, despite his repeated calls for a review on the Central waterfront area, government members were obstinate about postponing the task until July - after the proposal for a HK$5 billion government headquarters at Tamar is expected to pass through the Legislative Council.

"So I'm not willing to sit here and waste my time if that's the attitude from the other side," he said.

He added that he and other activists would soon be holding several public forums on the planning of the Central harborfront to talk about the "real issues."

Zimmerman's relinquishment of the business representative post on the 29-member committee comes fast on the heels of his resignation in February from the executive committee of the Harbour Business Forum - two events he admits are related.

It also comes at a tense time when politicians and businesses alike are feeling the pressure to back the Tamar proposal, according to sources.

"Now it's up to them to find their own voice, to step up, and to not stand down when the heat gets too hot in the kitchen," Zimmerman said.

He added, in closing: "I look forward to working together with all of you, because I will definitely not shut up outside this committee."

Deputy Secretary for Housing, Planning and Lands Robin Ip Man-fai responded by gesturing at the handful of officials present at the meeting, insisting the government's support was more than evident.

"The committee has done a great deal in the past few years ... I cannot agree that not enough resources have been put in," he said.

Earlier in the meeting, committee members debated whether legal advice should be sought to ensure reclamation for the proposed Central-Wan Chai bypass corridor would pass the "overriding public need" test, in accordance with a 2004 Court of Final Appeal ruling. Since the ruling, reclamation works in Hong Kong have come to a standstill.

Government officials expressed an eagerness to consult lawyers for clarification on the term "reclamation."

They wondered, for example, whether pilings used to support a flyover or a pier would constitute reclamation as they would technically lie on the seabed.

But property surveyor Nicholas Brooke advised against going into such detail, warning that such an approach would steer the committee off-track.

"I caution against proceeding in too formal a manner and bogging ourselves down in fine print," he said.

"We should focus on the outcomes, and then market these outcomes to groups and persuade them they're in the best interest of Hong Kong. We need to convince them to adopt a pragmatic approach."

Zimmerman agreed, saying the 2004 ruling may not have considered reclamation for public needs, such as piers or other recreational facilities.

"The government is stifled right now. They're so worried about that ruling that they're not coming up with a strategy," he said after the meeting.

"We need to discuss principles during the planning stage - if you build more developments, you'll eventually need more roads, which means more reclamation."

He said that, while the building of the Central-Wan Chai bypass could be excused because it was proposed before the court's ruling, it should not be used as justification to pursue further reclamation in the same manner.
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Old April 29th, 2006, 06:53 PM   #163
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Dishonourable politics will not buy Tamar credibility
28 April 2006
South China Morning Post

It is extremely disturbing that the government has been offering all kinds of favours to political parties to gain their support for building its headquarters at Tamar. While unconscionable governments worldwide do this under the pretext "this is politics", it is dishonourable.

The more the Hong Kong government proceeds down this road, the more obvious it is to right-thinking people that it has insufficient justification for the project. An honest approach would be for it to win public support on the merits of the plan.

The government is reminded that power is not a matter of privilege but of responsibility. It owes the public openness and transparency, and it must stop trying to buy its way forward with political favours.

A. CHUNG, Discovery Bay

The Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong and the Democratic Party have suggested they will blindly vote in favour of spending $5.13 billion on a building of unknown width, height and depth that will steal the breeze from Admiralty - and the very people who voted for them. By doing so, they have indicated they will not defend our right to clean air.

Tamar has been presented out of the context of the buildings that, taken together, will create a pollution canyon from IFC Two to Victoria Park. In the business community, this would be called a dereliction of fiduciary responsibility and lack of due diligence.

Over the past few months, we have been speaking to the Legislative Council to carefully explain the "street canyon" effect. The concept is simple. Take two tallish buildings, put a road between them, and the pollution is trapped. The government's response is that gaps (roads) in the rows of buildings prevent them from forming street canyons. In other words, our chief executive is telling us that these areas are not pollution canyons because there are roads between the buildings.

The two political parties must tell voters why they are not demanding to see an air ventilation assessment for the entire Central Reclamation Phase III and all the roads on the mountain side. They must do this before they vote billions to give the chief executive an edifice to his glory instead of spending it on a thousand other desperately needed projects.

PHILIP HEUNG, Clear the Air

The proposal to build the new government headquarters at Tamar has been discussed for years. Now that the government wants to go ahead, the community is divided into two main camps. One suggests the site should be put up for auction; the other that it be made a public park.

As a resident, I disagree with the idea of auctioning off the site for commercial use, as the density of the development would be high.

Building a park is a good, but unrealistic, idea. Land in Central is precious and the idea is not in line with the original outline development plan. Also, who would spend some 20 minutes walking from the Wan Chai or Admiralty MTR stations to visit a park when they can go to the easily accessible Chater Garden or Hong Kong Park?

What can take both idealism and reality into account is building civic and community facilities, including the new government complex. Turning the site into a hub of civic activity would attract large numbers of people to the place, as well as to the waterfront promenade and sitting-out area. This way, the park would not become an isolated island.

CHAN TAK-CHOR, chairman, Central and Western District Council
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Old April 30th, 2006, 07:30 AM   #164
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Yau Tong project may be downsized
Raymond Wang
28 April 2006
Hong Kong Standard

A large consortium led by Henderson Land is seeking a breakthrough for its planned mega housing project in Yau Tong Bay, estimated to be worth HK$60 billion, after the Kowloon East project stalled last year because of a land reclamation controversy.

Proposals for the much-awaited residential project _ which calls for the reclamation of 12.5 hectares of land from the sea and will transform Yau Tong Bay into a 22-hectare residential and commercial center _ will be submitted to the Town Planning Board within a couple of weeks, Henderson Land said.

If the reclamation is banned, the company said it might just slash the size of the project in order to push ahead with the development of the former shipyard.

"We will discuss with other owners of the Yau Tong Bay site regarding the proposals before submission," Henderson Land property development department general manager Augustine Wong Ho-ming said, without elaborating.

As currently planned, the project will provide 10,000 flats in 40 blocks with a total gross floor area of 9.7 million square feet, of which 1.7 million sq ft will be owned by Henderson.

The project is expected to be one of the biggest in Kowloon, coming in at about two-thirds the size of Tai Koo Shing, the largest development on Hong Kong Island. It will fetch nearly HK$60 billion, based on the almost HK$6,000 per square foot earned by the Canaryside development in Yau Tong. Other consortium members are New World Development, Wharf Holdings and some shipyard and timber mill owners.

Despite receiving land reclamation approval from the Environmental Protection Department in 2002, the project was delayed when the government began reviewing all reclamation projects after a public outcry against filling in the harbor in 2004.

In 2003, a court ruling against reclamation off Wan Chai said that any encroachment into the harbor had to be justified by a demonstrative overriding public need. While this does not cover the Yau Tong area, it did cause the government to rethink its approvals.

But the consortium argued that their reclamation would be positive for Yau Tong Bay, since it would involve cleaning up heavy pollution left over from when the bay was home to a shipyard.
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Old May 3rd, 2006, 06:04 PM   #165
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RTHK News:
New proposal for development of harbourfront 2006-05-03 HKT 18:45

A group of harbour protection activists has unveiled an alternative proposal to develop the Central harbourfront. It proposes splitting the planned government headquarters at Tamar into several smaller buildings and constructing a waterfront boulevard.
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Old May 6th, 2006, 08:16 PM   #166
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Central Pier @ 06/05/2006

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Old May 7th, 2006, 04:35 PM   #167
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RTHK news:
Govt defends Tamar construction costs 2006-05-07 HKT 18:59

The government has defended construction costs for the Tamar project. It said 4.8 billion dollars was reasonable and similar to those for other grade-A office buildings in the private sector.
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Old May 9th, 2006, 06:58 AM   #168
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From news.gov.hk:
Tamar project construction costs reasonable
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Old May 9th, 2006, 07:31 AM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258
Getting a building on reclaimed land must be EXTREMELY expensive.
It is but that's where the city's current tallest building is at.
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 03:44 PM   #170
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Review seeks less cluttered waterfront - Means of lowering density of building in Central on agenda
3 May 2006
South China Morning Post

A review aimed at reducing the density of the Central waterfront development, especially the amount of commercial space, will be launched after the government gets the funding it needs to build its new headquarters at Tamar.

The Planning Department has confirmed it will in July commission a consultant to study ways to lower the density of buildings in areas in the third phase of a zoning plan for the Central reclamation.

While Tamar will be excluded from the review, government planners will mainly focus on the four pieces of commercial land that will create millions of square feet of new floor space at the Central waterfront under the plan.

The Legislative Council's Finance Committee will examine the funding for Tamar next month. The government has already secured enough votes for the plans to go ahead, with the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong and the Liberal Party having declared their support to the project.

Political analysts believe the review is Chief Executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen's latest compromise in his attempts to smooth the way for construction of the Tamar headquarters.

Harbour activists welcomed the review, but said it should have been conducted earlier as damage had already been done.

Ma Ngok, of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, said: "The chief executive sees Tamar as his major achievement. If major corporations and developers have problems with [too much] commercial space in Central, and if the government can do something to address their concern, he is prepared to compromise."

The planning of the reclaimed land at Central has been a major concern of many groups such as the Harbour Business Forum, a coalition of 120 leading companies and business groups. The forum met Mr Tsang in March to request he conduct a comprehensive review of the plan.

Mr Tsang used the meeting to express dissatisfaction at the lack of support from the business community for the Tamar development, and also expressed his unhappiness at the request for a review.

A Planning Department spokesman said: "We will examine the design criteria, and refine the urban design framework of the waterfront with Central's landscape and public aspirations. I'm sure it will be less dense than before. But we're not prepared to change any land use. Commercial space will still be commercial space." He said the review would include a comprehensive public consultation exercise, and the result would be incorporated into the land leases.

Paul Zimmerman, convenor of the Designing Hong Kong Harbour District group, said the review should have come two years ago.

"At last, the government has realised the plan has serious problems {hellip} If they had started the review two years ago, we would not need huge roads along the Central waterfront," he said.
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 03:46 PM   #171
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Vision to carve up Tamar into five areas presented
Leslie Kwoh
4 May 2006
Hong Kong Standard

In a last-ditch effort to influence lawmakers against issuing a "blank check" for the proposed government headquarters at Tamar, a group of activists has hatched an alternative vision for the site and its surrounding areas that involve simple adjustments while conforming with the administration's current plans.

According to the alternative plans _ unveiled Wednesday by Civic Exchange, Designing Hong Kong Harbour District and World Wildlife Fund _ the 2.2-hectare government complex at Tamar will be broken up into five units, creating more human-scale pedestrian spaces between buildings.

An area for protesters called "Democracy Square" will be situated at the center of the site.

The group said these changes will not increase the cost of the HK$5 billion project, and will lend a more "vibrant" feel to the area compared with the administration's current plans, which place the headquarters on one half of the site and a public square on the other.

The plan retains the controversial dimensions for the headquarters _ a 120,400-square-meter gross floor area and a 20-story building. The Central- Wanchai bypass will also be kept, and no changes will be made to the water- edge of the Central reclamation area.

The decision to go along with the so- called "government specifications" is not a sign of agreement but rather recognition of "the political reality," Designing Hong Kong Harbour District convenor Paul Zimmerman said.

In order to win over the two largest political parties _ the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong and the Liberal Party _ Zimmerman said it was necessary to "include whatever the government wants because the parties have made the political decision to support the government." Only after lawmakers back the alternative vision can there be negotiation.

"We are not selling out, we are just trying to get in the door. And to do that, we have to first make sure to conform with the government," he said.

A previous alternative plan, called "Central Park," was launched by Civic Exchange in January but failed to win support.

"A lot of people said it needed more developments," said Civic Exchange chief executive officer Christine Loh Kung-wai. "But we think any of these plans is a better plan than the government's." Zimmerman said he has presented the alternative plan to the DAB, the Liberal Party and the Civic Party, as well as government officials. A meeting with the Democratic Party is in the works.

"Lawmakers were all very enthusiastic when they saw this. But they're under extreme pressure from the chief executive," he said.

With regard to the rest of the Central waterfront, the alternative plan recommends the area between the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre and the Central ferry piers be studded with low-density, one- to three-story commercial buildings.

The proposed "groundscraper" _ the long, two-story pedestrian deck connecting Statue Square and the Star Ferry _ will be cut from the plan after it received widespread criticism from the public, including members of the Harbour Business Forum.

Instead, a ground-level plaza, complete with greenery and public furniture, will be built in its place.

In addition, the proposed trunk road along the shoreline will be made into a tree-lined "ocean boulevard" with traffic lights and pedestrian crossings at street level.

Any traffic congestion issues should be resolved by immediately extending the tram and MTR lines to the northern shoreline, the alternative plan said.

"This is really a planning issue, but it has become a political issue because the government is rushing to get funding," Loh said. "If it were seen as planning, we think all the political parties would be happy to have the chance to see what the options really are."
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 03:51 PM   #172
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Harbour activists unveilown plan for Tamar HQ
Groups call for 20-storey height limit and a zone for protests

4 May 2006
South China Morning Post

Harbour activists yesterday unveiled a counterproposal to the government's plan for building its headquarters at Tamar.

They propose that the future government headquarters should be no more than 20 storeys high and call for a "democracy square" in the middle of Tamar where protesters can hold demonstrations.

This plan, jointly presented by think-tank Civic Exchange and the Designing Hong Kong Harbour District, includes a proposal for breaking up four major pieces of commercial land along the Central waterfront into smaller plots for gardens between shops and offices.

"If the smaller government headquarters cannot accommodate all the civil servants they want to move to Tamar, the authorities can [accommodate them] at the current offices at Government Hill," said Designing Hong Kong Harbour District organiser Paul Zimmerman.

The government will conduct a review of development along the Central waterfront in July, but this will be limited to studying ways to reduce building density in commercial zones.

Civic Exchange chief executive Christine Loh Kung-wai said: "All the buildings are going to be low-rise. By making each plot smaller, there will be multiple ownership of land at the Central waterfront, instead of leaving land in the hands of the biggest developers."

The activists will present their proposal at a public forum on Sunday at Caritas Community Centre in Caine Road, Mid-Levels. They will incorporate views gathered at the forum and produce a model of the site to visualise the plan.

They also hope to present their plan to the Legislative Council before the public accounts subcommittee recommends funding approval to the government's Tamar development at the end of this month.

"This is a planning issue, but the government turns it into a political issue and asserts heavy pressure on the legislators to approve funding in a short period. Whatever happens to Central harbourfront is in the hands of the Legislative Council," said Ms Loh.

Meanwhile, the Civic Party said it would conduct a survey on Tamar through its newspaper, A45, published today.

The party said it would include a questionnaire in the newspaper, in which members of the public will be asked for their views on the government's Tamar plan and whether they want a comprehensive review of development of the Central waterfront.

The public can also express their views on whether Government Hill should be sold for commercial development.

Also, the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong said it would launch its own proposals for the Kai Tak airport site.

DAB lawmaker Chan Kam-lam said his party still wanted the government to build its Kowloon headquarters at Kai Tak, through reclamation of the Kai Tak nullah.
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 05:05 PM   #173
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Harbour activists unveilown plan for Tamar HQ
Groups call for 20-storey height limit and a zone for protests
LOL!!! Only in Hong Kong would they purposely put a "zone for protests". I can't believe Hong Kongers protest so much. They should be lucky as they have some of the world's highest standards of living...
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Old May 22nd, 2006, 05:14 PM   #174
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^ I think the right to protest is very important but it's ridiculous to demand a specific zone for it. Why not just protest in Statue Square in Central?
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 03:43 PM   #175
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LOL!!! Only in Hong Kong would they purposely put a "zone for protests". I can't believe Hong Kongers protest so much. They should be lucky as they have some of the world's highest standards of living...
It stops 'city shutdown' to be fair...
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 08:26 PM   #176
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Statistics for Tamar site challenged
Development density for new government HQ, and $2b shortfall on the construction cost are contested by lawmakers

12 May 2006
South China Morning Post

The development density of the Tamar project is higher than the government has revealed, legislators were told yesterday.

Lawmakers also found a $2 billion shortfall between the construction cost and the money the government is seeking, and demanded a precise breakdown on why $5.1 billion would be needed for the Tamar development.

Members of the planning, lands and works panel decided to hold another panel meeting unless officials provided satisfactory written answers. If the replies were accepted, the project would be submitted for discussion at the public works subcommittee meeting on May 29.

The legislature's Finance Committee will vote on the funding on June 23 after the subcommittee endorses the project. The panel's vice-chairman, Patrick Lau Sau-shing, said he had found that Tamar's plot ratio should be 7.3, instead of 5.7 announced by the government.

The discovery came as the administration released the gross floor area of the proposed government headquarters and the Legco building.

The government offices will comprise 124,680 square metres and the Legco buildings 36,230 square metres. The Tamar site area will cover 2.2 hectares. Mr Lau said the plot ratio should be 7.3 - calculated by dividing the gross floor area of the government offices and Legco buildings by the site area. He also questioned why there was a $2 billion shortfall, saying the figures did not add up.

He said with a total area of 201,910 square metres and a cost of $14,500 per square metre, the total cost should be around $3 billion, not $5.1 billion as suggested by the government.

The administration yesterday failed to explain the difference in the plot ratio and funding shortfall.

Mr Lau, a retired architecture professor, accused the government of misleading the public and the legislature.

Meanwhile, independent legislator Kwok Ka-ki continued to question the government on why it had to move 3,200 civil servants to Tamar. Mr Kwok said his research on the number of principal officials concluded there were only 386.

"Even if all the principal civil servants take their secretaries and clerks with them to the new headquarters, we don't need to move 3,200 people to Tamar," Mr Kwok said. The government said it would only move principal officials involved in policy making to the new headquarters.

Twenty-one organisations expressed their views on the Tamar project yesterday. The Construction Industry Employees General Union was the only one calling for quick implementation of the project.
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Old May 26th, 2006, 11:18 PM   #177
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Will this be the new face of Central? Activists warn of the impact if prime government site is exploited to the full
20 May 2006
South China Morning Post

Three 70-storey towers providing 5.4 million sq ft of office space could be built on a podium at the site of the Central Government Offices if the land goes into private hands and is developed to its full potential, harbour activists warn.

John Bowden, chairman of Save Our Shorelines, said the city would either have a three-tower development on Lower Albert Road that would be taller than The Peak, or four 50-storey towers which would create a wall effect, altering air flow and blocking the views of Mid-Levels residents.

He described the group's estimate as conservative, since developers could easily boost density by increasing the plot ratio.

"The [Central Government Offices] site is currently covered to less than 10 per cent of its potential," Mr Bowden said, adding that the site had no height restriction, while ridge-line protection was non-binding. Ridge-line protection refers to the recommendation that views to the ridges and peaks be partly building-free.

Officials have so far refused to discuss the future of the site if the government moves its headquarters to Tamar. However, officials suggested last summer that selling the site would cover Tamar's development cost.

The harbour group believed a podium would likely be built in any office tower development because it would create retail rental space.

According to a government-commissioned report on the development potential of the offices' West Wing, released two months ago, there was retail potential if the site was used for commercial purposes.

The report also said it was possible for developers to increase the site's density and plot ratio.

"It is traditional for developers to seek to maximise the gross floor area and the plot ratio through the dedication of ground floor areas to public use and as a result, secure an increase in the gross floor area equivalent to five times the amount dedicated," the report said.

"We would anticipate that much of the podium deck at the Lower Albert Road level will be dedicated to public use, and indeed, on the basis of some very preliminary calculations, it may be possible to achieve an increase in the plot ratio/gross floor area to the maximum permitted, namely 18:1."

Mr Bowden said that relocating the government headquarters to Tamar "holds the potential for further damage to the environment if the land is sold for commercial redevelopment".

He also warned of increased traffic congestion and an impact on air quality if the site was built to the maximum potential.
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Old May 27th, 2006, 05:20 AM   #178
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _00_deathscar
It stops 'city shutdown' to be fair...
That's true. Even if they didn't designate a "zone for protests", people would normally just congregate in large, open public areas. Therefore, the new waterfront in Central would be a likely choice. Not to mention that if the government headquarters is built in Tamar, its naturally going to attract large crowds for protests.
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Old May 28th, 2006, 05:29 AM   #179
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Construction cost for Tamar development project reasonable
Wednesday, May 24, 2006
Government Press Release

The Government dismisses today (May 24) as erroneous and misleading suggestions that the estimated unit construction cost for the Tamar development project is higher than that for the International Finance Centre (IFC) Two.

The comparison failed to take into account the fact that the development project covers not just construction of the Legislative Council Complex and the Central Government Complex, but also a 2-hectare open space, drainage and related works in the open space and two covered pedestrian footbridges. The latter items should not be counted into the unit construction cost. Besides, it should not be assumed that the contingency provision for the entire project would necessarily be spent or indeed spent on building works.

As explained in the paper for the Public Works Subcommittee, the estimated unit construction cost for the Tamar development project (around $11,600 per m2) is lower than the market comparator for Grade A office buildings (about $13,000 per m2). When quoting the market benchmark, the Government has drawn reference to the regular professional surveying updates published by Levitt & Bailey and Davis Langdon & Seah.

The Government has no basis to verify the figures quoted for the IFC Two development. In any event, given the wrong analysis on the Tamar development project, the Government cannot agree with the conclusions drawn.
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Old May 28th, 2006, 02:29 PM   #180
Aboveday
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May 28, 2006

Central harbourfront to be vibrant, attractive



The future Central harbourfront will be vibrant, attractive and accessible, Director of Planning Bosco Fung says, adding it will become a world-class waterfront with quality public and private developments in a luxuriant landscape setting.



Speaking at a press briefing today, Mr Fung said the area's land use framework is holistic and balanced, reflecting the community's aspirations for providing extensive public open space along the harbour, while maintaining the competitive edge of the Central Business District.



The illustrative concept for the new Central harbourfront has three design emphases, namely creating vibrancy and diversity; creating enjoyable public spaces; and creating a green edge to the harbour and the district.



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"The new harbourfront will be attractive in having a green unifying edge endowed with quality public and private developments in a luxuriant landscape setting. It will be vibrant day and night with a mix of uses and diversity of functions, inviting different activities and residents and tourists alike to the harbourfront," he said.



"There will be good access with the provision of multi-modal transport and comprehensive pedestrian linkages at different levels to bring people to the harbour. The new Central harbourfront will become a symbol of Hong Kong, with a distinctive urban form in harmony with the ridgelines and the harbour setting."



Mr Fung said the 11-hectare waterfront promenade, which is bigger than the eight-hectare Hong Kong Park, will offer residents assorted recreation with open-air facilities such as outdoor forums, amphitheatres, green open space, harbourside walkways and undulating lawns.



Leisure and entertainment activities, outdoor media shows and performances can be organised. Ancillary facilities for resting and alfresco dining will also be available.



3 principal corridors

The urban design framework is structured upon a waterfront promenade across the water edge, intersecting with three principal corridors linking the city with the harbour. All of them will terminate in the new harbourfront with focal points including the new Star Ferry Pier, public piers, plazas, and other activity nodes.



"The nine-storey office-commercial building linking Statue Square to the new Star Ferry pier provides a low-rise garden deck and an at-grade landscape walkway. The development would be a new unique building with cascading design, and extensive setbacks to provide garden decks, terraces and roof gardens," Mr Fung said.



Mr Fung said the land use zonings and other planning parameters including height restrictions laid down in the Outline Zoning Plans have provided a framework for the future developments.



Innovative ideas welcome

"Within the broad development framework, and provided the permitted uses and development intensity as expressed in plot ratio or building height as laid down in the OZPs are not exceeded, we welcome innovative ideas and believe there are no lack of design options which will best realise our planning vision of creating a world-class harbourfront," he said.



A bilingual pamphlet explaining the Government's planning vision has been published and a 3-D model to provide visual images of the new harbourfront area will be displayed at City Hall's Hong Kong Planning & Exhibition Gallery from May 31.


The Planning Department will undertake an urban design study to further refine the existing urban design framework and to prepare planning-design briefs for the key sites on the Central harbourfront to guide future developments. The community will be fully engaged in the study process.






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