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Old June 23rd, 2017, 06:45 PM   #101
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Until now, almost all posts in this thread has been from the city core as narrowly defined. Not all buildings of "high end quality" from the city core have been shown, but it would be monotonous now to show them now just to be systematic. In stead I want to expand focus from the city core to the "city proper".

Until now, I have repeatedly used this map as one definition (one used by the city of Oslo itself) of the "city core"; the commercial center:


When I talk of the "city proper", I mean the part of the city build according to an urban "standard". In the classical phase of the city`s development, that meant city block planning with buildings that as were 4 to 6 stories (as main rule).

This map of Oslo is from 1930. It shows exactly what I described as the "city proper" as it existed at that time. Now, since later growth mainly took place in modern times, the map is good for showing where in the city classical architecture is to be found:


Below, I have superimposed the area of the "city core" (dark blue) onto the historic map of the "city proper":


The lighter blue line divides east and west, where the western part is more upper middle to upper class - and east lower middle to working class. As logic demands, most of the high quality classical architecture was build in that western concentric part of the city.
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Old June 24th, 2017, 12:31 PM   #102
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Here are some street shots from Oslo West - Frogner:

Thomas Heftyes gate


Skovveien


Gimleveien
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Old June 24th, 2017, 03:53 PM   #103
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Here are a few photos from Frognerveien (Frogner street) which is a main street through the southern part of Oslo West, together with Bygdøy alle/ally and Drammensveien.






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Old June 25th, 2017, 12:09 PM   #104
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Bygdøy alle/ally can`t be presented in one short post - so this is just a first taste of some classical buildings of the street.







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Old June 25th, 2017, 01:05 PM   #105
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Here a few photos from Henrik Ibsens Street. It binds Oslo city core with the city west, running adjacent the "palace park" to its south.





The Nobel Institute.


The building housing the Ibsen Museum.
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Old June 25th, 2017, 04:41 PM   #106
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The place in the "City West" that has fared worst under modernism is probably Solli plass ("Sol-li square").

Here`s an historic aerial photo of what the square used to look like - the orange encircled buildings were later to be moronically demolished:


Here`s how tha same place looks now, sadly one of the least appealing places in the city - when it would have the potential for the opposite. The orange squares mark the location of those once existing buildings shown above:


Here are ground photos of the two buildings that were torn:


Mogen Thorsens Stiftelse:


This building now remains the historic aliby of the square; the former university library, currently housing the national library.
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Old June 26th, 2017, 06:17 PM   #107
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Thomas Heftyes street has some special, towered buildings that are very well kept in their original shapes.

Street overview




Thomas Heftyes street 45 and 47 in interplay.


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Old June 26th, 2017, 06:28 PM   #108
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Further down the same street lies "Thomas Heftyes square". I don´t even know who the guy was or what he did, but he will be associated with architectural tastefulness.

This three photos cover all angles of the square:




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Old June 26th, 2017, 11:43 PM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ELH View Post
Here`s a few pictures from Holbergs plass ("Holberg`s square") on the edge og the city core to the north west.

I dare suggest Scandic Holberg Hotel is Oslo`s most italian looking building:

Here are two pictures showing how this building initially looked like before it was extended and reconstructed into the appearance seen in your picture.

In 1903.


And from a slightly different angle two years later in 1905.
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Old June 27th, 2017, 12:02 AM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ELH View Post
Here are some street shots from Oslo West - Frogner:

Skovveien
http://imageshack.com/a/img924/1087/P0nkSx.jpg
Skovveien is well preserved and only one unique 19th century building have been lost from what I know (which can be presented in a own post later on). What have had more impact is the changing roof tops which have lost towers, ornamentation and spires. This is how it looked like in 1903:





Almost the same angles today taken from Google streetview. Note the simplified roofs.


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Old June 27th, 2017, 12:26 AM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ELH View Post
Bygdøy alle/ally can`t be presented in one short post - so this is just a first taste of some classical buildings of the street.


This building - Bygdøy Allé 1 - is actually part of a much larger complex known as the Pariserkvartalet that stretches across the whole first block of Bygdøy Allé. The complex consist of 7 individual buildings that were all built by the same developer and in the same style by the same architect to create a unified whole, basically the same concept that was behind the development of the complex in Camilla Colletts gate that have been presented here earlier. The architect responsible for Pariserkvartalet was Bernhard Steckmest and the buildings were built in the period 1889 to 1891.

These complex was popular in Oslo for a time and the city got many variations of the theme. Sadly many have since been individually altered and have lost the feeling of a larger complex with it. This have also happened here: The buildings have been painted in different colors (as can be seen in current picture), the have gotten different altered first floor and all buildings have gotten reduced spires.

This is how the complex originally looked like when built. Here seen from Solli Plass in 1905.


Looking up Bygdøy Allé in 1907. The two high spired buildings to the right and the ones in between belongs to Pariserkvartalet.


Here see under construction in 1889. Det Engelske Kvarter can be seen to the right.


Looking down Bygødy Allé in 1903. The high spired buildings on the left side of the street and the ones in between were all part of Pariserkvartalet,
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Old June 27th, 2017, 02:46 AM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ELH View Post
Thomas Heftyes street has some special, towered buildings that are very well kept in their original shapes.

Street overview
The building seen to the left was built in 1898 with Halfdan Berle as the architect. The roof on the "corner rotunda" have been altered. Here is how the same building appeared in 1904.



Quote:
Originally Posted by ELH View Post
Thomas Heftyes street 45 and 47 in interplay.

http://imageshack.com/a/img924/9918/sjnNrd.jpg
Thomas Heftyes gate 45 and 47 were both designed by Sigurd Reidolph Gulbransen and built between 1899 and 1900. Of interest then it could be mentioned that the infamous (in Norway) architect Magnus Poulsson spent his childhood in number 47. Both buildings are well preserved as noted by you, but the roof have again been simplified: The towers does not have any contrasting elements any longer and the "vases" along the roof line are long gone. Here is number 47 seen in the 1920s.


As a side note the picture you chose to illustrate these buidlings with is actually a crop of a picture taken by me many years ago. Here are the original picture and another picture I took at the same time of the two building from a different angle.


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Old June 27th, 2017, 03:45 PM   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ELH View Post
Bygdøy alle/ally can`t be presented in one short post - so this is just a first taste of some classical buildings of the street.



These two building both belong to a apartment complex covering fourth fifth of a whole city block in Bygdøy Állé. They were constructed between 1900 and 1901 with Petter Johannesen from Tønsberg as the developer. Joahannesen had hired Samuel Borgfelt from Gothenburg to design the buildings.

The first building - Bygdøy Allé 53 - have lost the window frames in the second floor, parts of building have been painted in the same yellow color as the bricks which have reduced the contrasts and it lost the details on top of the gable spires. Here it is seen around 1920.


The changes can't have happened much after that picture was taken as the details are already gone on this picture from 1939. Also note that the neighboring building seen farther down the street to the right have lost a dome.



The second building - Bygdøy Allé 59 - have been better preserved but it have still lost some spires and gotten a reduced spire on top of the rounded corner. Here it is seen in 1910.
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Old June 27th, 2017, 11:53 PM   #114
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ELH View Post
Further down the same street lies "Thomas Heftyes square". I don´t even know who the guy was or what he did, but he will be associated with architectural tastefulness.

Thomas Heftye was a local politician, a bankowner, one of the instigator to the establishment of the Norwegian Trekking Association, and the developer of the first tourist-minded developments at Frognerseteren and Sarabråten. But the reason that the street is named after him is simply because it leads to his former property in Thomas Heftyes gate 8.

But I thought I would say something about the rather anonymous white corner building in the middle of your photo. We are again talking about a former apartment complex taking up a whole city block, this time between Erling Skjalgssons gate in the South and Thomas Heftyes gate in the North.
This time it was Swedish-born and German educated Eduard Carlén that was responsible for the architecture. The complex have sadly been extensively altered throughout the years; What was once a rather pleasant neo-baroque building now almost looks like a early modernistic build, at least towards Thomas Heftyes plass. It is better preserved at the other end.

Here it is seen in 1903 (to the right).


The corner building towards Thomas Heftyes gate can also be seen to the left in this picture taken between 1930 and 1940.


The corner at the other side of the complex, towards Erling Skjalgssons gate, have been better preserved even if have still lost a lot of details. Here it is seen in 1965, but it basically looks like this still. Also note the reduced tower on the corner building to the left. Its original appearance can be seen in the background of the 1903 picture.
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Old June 28th, 2017, 06:39 PM   #115
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Here are just another few good looking buildings from city west:

Camilla Colletts gate


Oscars gate 61


Riddervoldsgate


Oscars gate 70
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Old June 30th, 2017, 07:35 PM   #116
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Still in the city west, but just north of the southernmost upper class districts runs Bogstadveien/Hegdehaugsveien, which is really one street binding the city core with the "west end center" Majorstua. It is the "second shopping street" of Oslo, after the Karl Johans street of the city core.

Bogstadveien beginning at Majorstua:




Intersection of Hegdehaugsveien and Parkveien
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Old June 30th, 2017, 09:47 PM   #117
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Here are some phoros of "Ilatrappa", a detail of a residential complext from the early 20th century. It lies in the transition zone between Oslo West and Oslo East.









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Old June 30th, 2017, 09:59 PM   #118
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St.Hanshaugen is a park and a nearby city quarter alike.
Here some photos from the city area.
It lies to the north in the city west.







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Old June 30th, 2017, 10:08 PM   #119
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The park itself (St.Hanshaugen, that is) used to look like this:



This building was located in the park and is sadly lost now.



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Old June 30th, 2017, 11:26 PM   #120
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The area of "Bislett", further north in the city west, is most known for its athletics stadium. Here are some photos from the surrounding blocks:





This architecture reminds me more than some of the Mariannenplatz in Berlin.


An old city bath. For some years from the 90s on, it gained some unwanted fame for more or less regular, public sexual activity.


The building where author Jo Nesbø phantasized his Harry Hole to live:

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