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Old July 4th, 2007, 01:59 PM   #741
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Holy shit, we got the banner....who submitted it?
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Old July 4th, 2007, 03:52 PM   #742
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No clue, but it's looking very good.
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Old July 4th, 2007, 04:25 PM   #743
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No clue, but it's looking very good.
I just wished it showed some sort of DC urbanity rather than just a single building.
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Old July 5th, 2007, 02:01 AM   #744
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Bethesda is all over the news today because of the AT&T national featuring George H.W. Bush and Tiger's first tournament as a father. Also, Al Gore's son had some legal dealings today relating to his marijuana possession arrest in Bethesda.

I'll be there on Sunday for the final round, hopefully some of you all make it as well.
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Old July 8th, 2007, 09:05 PM   #745
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Bethesda is all over the news today because of the AT&T national featuring George H.W. Bush and Tiger's first tournament as a father. Also, Al Gore's son had some legal dealings today relating to his marijuana possession arrest in Bethesda.

I'll be there on Sunday for the final round, hopefully some of you all make it as well.
Yes, this is awesome publicity, it's a good time to be a Marylander.
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Old July 9th, 2007, 05:52 PM   #746
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Coventry to acquire Florida health plan for $685M
Washington Business Journal - 10:52 AM EDT Monday, July 9, 2007
by Neil Adler
Staff Reporter

Coventry Health Care Inc. has signed a definitive agreement to purchase Florida Health Plan Administrators LLC, owner of Vista Healthplans, for $685 million in cash.

Vista, a privately owned, Hollywood, Fla.-based plan, has some 295,000 members, about 85 percent of them in the South Florida market. It has about $1.2 billion in annual revenue, according to Bethesda-based Coventry.

"This acquisition will expand Coventry's health plan footprint into one of the nation's fastest growing states," Coventry CEO Dale Wolf said in a statement.

The transaction is expected to close in 90 to 180 days.

Vista's membership consists of 153,000 commercial employer group members, 33,000 individual members, 26,000 Medicare Advantage HMO members and 83,000 state program members.

Coventry (NYSE: CVH) said the transaction is expected to add 8 to 11 cents to its per-share earnings in 2008.


Do you guys think we should get an economic news thread separate from the development news thread?
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Old July 9th, 2007, 06:24 PM   #747
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Coventry to acquire Florida health plan for $685M
Washington Business Journal - 10:52 AM EDT Monday, July 9, 2007
by Neil Adler
Staff Reporter

Coventry Health Care Inc. has signed a definitive agreement to purchase Florida Health Plan Administrators LLC, owner of Vista Healthplans, for $685 million in cash.

Vista, a privately owned, Hollywood, Fla.-based plan, has some 295,000 members, about 85 percent of them in the South Florida market. It has about $1.2 billion in annual revenue, according to Bethesda-based Coventry.

"This acquisition will expand Coventry's health plan footprint into one of the nation's fastest growing states," Coventry CEO Dale Wolf said in a statement.

The transaction is expected to close in 90 to 180 days.

Vista's membership consists of 153,000 commercial employer group members, 33,000 individual members, 26,000 Medicare Advantage HMO members and 83,000 state program members.

Coventry (NYSE: CVH) said the transaction is expected to add in8 to 11 cents to its per-share earnings in 2008.


Do you guys think we should get an economic news thread separate from the development news thread?
LOL I was just about to post this...you should put it in the biotech thread as well.
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Old July 9th, 2007, 08:20 PM   #748
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Landover May Be Next On Revival Bandwagon
Ambitious Proposal Channels Bethesda


By Ovetta Wiggins
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, July 9, 2007; B01

Prince George's County officials are pushing an ambitious plan to transform downtown Landover, home of the Washington Redskins, into a Bethesda-like space where people can sip lattes at sidewalk cafes and dine at upscale restaurants.

A rubble-filled lot just inside the Capital Beltway where the bustling Landover Mall once stood would be replaced with luxury townhouses, trendy stores and office buildings. Two nearby apartment buildings, built nearly four decades ago, would be demolished. New construction would replace them, and the residents who occupy the 1,000 units would be relocated.

"This is going to be a major project," said County Council member David Harrington (D-Cheverly), who represents the Landover area. "The importance of this plan is that it sets in motion a vision for this area."

The development, which is in the very early planning stages, is the latest attempt to breathe new life into the inner and older suburbs of Prince George's, where District residents flocked in the 1960s and '70s for sprawling green lawns, trees and affordable housing. The area has changed, however, in the past couple of decades: Crime rates have risen, housing stock has eroded and student academic performance has slipped.

"We have some of the crime stuff, the transient kind of moving," said Sylvester Vaughns, 71, a member of the county planning board and longtime Landover resident.

The proposal to transform Landover into a residential and cultural hub is an example of what is happening in inside-the-Beltway communities throughout the county, with private-public development projects boosting the profiles of areas including Hyattsville and Suitland.

For example, a two-mile strip in Hyattsville that was once filled with auto repair shops and liquor stores is being reshaped into an arts and entertainment district, where condominiums with lofts are being marketed to artists.

Farther south, Suitland Manor, a 33-acre complex of barracks-style apartments, is being demolished, and an $80 million development of single-family houses, condominiums and rental apartments will be built. County officials say a developer will soon be selected for the project, part of an overall residential and commercial center in Suitland.

Harrington said the Landover development hinges on a commitment from Lerner Corp., which owns the mall property. Lerner's 88 acres cover more than two-thirds of the area being considered for development.

"We're very much on board," said Joel Rozner, an attorney for Lerner.

Over the years, Lerner has been approached at different times with proposals to relocate the county seat, school board headquarters and Prince George's Hospital Center to its site off Brightseat Road. Lerner showed interest, but none of the proposals came to fruition.

Rozner said that the company wants a "vibrant mixed-used development" on the property and that the current plans are a "work in progress."

Planners are drafting the Landover Gateway Sector Plan, which would cover the demolished mall site, two aging apartment complexes, the Landover Crossing Shopping Center -- a half-empty complex with a liquor store, nail salon and barbecue takeout restaurant -- and a nearby abandoned used-car dealership. The county would need to make a zoning change in the area from commercial and residential to mixed use.

For years, community activists and residents of Landover, which includes the neighborhoods of Palmer Park, Kentland, Glenarden and Brightseat, have urged the county to push for revitalization of the area.

Diane McGlone, 53, said she wants beauty and jobs brought back to the area.

The Palmer Park resident remembers shopping, going to dinner and seeing movies at Landover Mall, which sits at the Capital Beltway and Landover Road, during its heyday in the mid-1970s.

The mall, with Garfinckels, Woodward & Lothrop and Hecht's as its anchors, was a landmark in the county for three decades. Before Bowie Town Center was built, people from across the region converged on the mall, which provided shoppers with the type of quality stores offered in nearby Montgomery and Fairfax counties.

But a stabbing on mall property, a shooting at a nearby apartment complex that left five people dead and a surge in overall crime in the area in the late 1980s and early 1990s frightened shoppers and eventually helped fuel the mall's rapid decline.

By the time the mall closed in 2002, it had been reduced to a shell of its former self, its fashionable stores replaced with others selling items for a dollar, McGlone said. Only Sears remains of what used to be Landover Mall.

"Whatever they do, it will be beneficial for the community," McGlone said.

But not everyone is so certain.

Glenarden Mayor John W. Anderson said he is worried about the thousands of people, many of them low-income, who will be forced from their homes.

"Where are they going to go?" Anderson asked. "Somebody needs to be concerned about that. . . . It's not that I'm not advocating for development, but you have to also be concerned about the people who are going to be displaced."

Arthur Berlin, general partner of the Maple Ridge Apartments, which has more than 400 units, said he is interested not in selling his property, but in improving it. Berlin said he'd like to see a more upscale community, but he also wants "to make sure long-term tenants are able to react to the situation."

Harrington said the redevelopment of the area is designed to complement the nearly $1 billion mixed-use development being built less than two miles away, known as Woodmore Towne Centre at Glenarden. The 245-acre development, set to open next year, will include condominiums, a hotel, office space and a Wegmans grocery store.

"The two areas would strengthen each other," said Christine Osei, a county planner who is working on the Landover plan.

Osei said an outline of the development should be finished by the end of the year. A public hearing is expected to be held in February, and the council will consider it for final approval at the end of next year, according to the projected timetable.

Current Site:

The Landover Mall site covers most of the area planners want to develop.
The plan hinges on a commitment from its owner, Lerner Corp.,
an official said. (Maryland-national Capital Park And Planning Commission)


Concept Rendering:

Rendering of envisioned development for the area behind Landover Mall.
Prince George's officials are endorsing the development of the area.
Courtesy of washingtonpost.com


Copyright 2007 The Washington Post Co.

Last edited by pennster; July 9th, 2007 at 08:34 PM.
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Old July 9th, 2007, 08:29 PM   #749
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Big boss guy has this to say:

Growing Montgomery

Monday, July 9, 2007; D03
By Royce Hanson, Montgomery County Planning Board Chairman



The central theme of Montgomery County Planning Board's 2007 growth policy recommendations to the County Council is that development should be managed in ways that contribute to the sustainability of our facilities, communities and resources, not merely to assure provision of adequate facilities for each increment of growth.

Historically, Montgomery County growth policy was focused on the prevention of premature development. It was concerned almost exclusively with administration of the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance, which requires the Planning Board to deny subdivisions if public facilities in the area, primarily roads, are not adequate to serve them.

Relatively little development activity is converting open fields into subdivisions. Growth policy must now manage the transformation of older suburban centers into vital and varied urban places, conservation of neighborhoods and conversion of a mobility system centered on cars into one that favors public transportation, biking and walking.

It is now possible to make sustainability the goal of growth policy because of the experience the county has gained in managing its growth, along with advances in technology and skills in state-of-the-art modeling and analysis. It is necessary because of the convergence of great natural, economic and social forces, each of which has profound implications for where and how we grow and develop. These forces include global climate change and the impact of urbanization on energy consumption, carbon sequestration, and fragile landscapes and watersheds.

Demographic shifts, combined with the information revolution, have changed housing preferences and the nature of work. The impact of these forces means that it is not enough to focus growth policy only on staging private growth and setting priorities for capital improvements. The pattern of growth and the design of communities are equally important so that we do not compromise the county's ability to meet future needs. In this sense, growth policy represents an ethical choice about our stewardship of the county, recognition that choices we make today have consequences that endure for generations.

We have recommended a two-step system for measuring the adequacy of transportation facilities. First, we must examine the experience of the traveler living in each of the county's policy areas, including the times it takes to travel driving or using public transportation. If either of those times is within the bounds set by national standards developed by the Transportation Research Board of the National Research Council, the first part of the adequacy test will have been met.

The second part of the transportation test deals with congestion at intersections. If traffic generated will exceed available capacity, the applicant must reduce auto trips or make roadway or transit improvements to proceed.

We have recommended substantial increases in development impact taxes and fees for transportation and schools. The tax is based on the cost of the portion of planned transportation and school infrastructure required to serve each new unit. All projects would pay the impact taxes. In addition, special impact measures are proposed if projects fail the policy area mobility test. If any level of the school system is operating at more than 110 percent of programmed capacity, a project must pay a fee based on the cost of producing the added space for each student it generates. A project must wait for facilities to be expanded if schools are operating at 135 percent of capacity.

Requiring new projects to pay the marginal cost of the facilities needed to support them is critical to helping the county remain fiscally sustainable. There may be policy reasons for reducing fees and taxes for some development, such as affordable housing, but we should know what the cost of development is before deciding who should bear the burden, the new project or all taxpayers.

This commentary is excerpted from an entry in a new blog by Royce Hanson, chairman of the Montgomery County Planning Board (http://mncppc.typepad.com/chairman). Hanson served as director of George Washington University's Center for Washington Area Studies before his appointment as chairman of the planning board in 2006. He previously served on the planning board from 1972 to 1981, during which the county adopted public facilities policies to guide growth and established an 93,000-acre agricultural preserve.

Copyright 2007 The Washington Post Co.
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Old July 9th, 2007, 08:32 PM   #750
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Nonprofits Grab Office Condos in the District

By Allan Lengel
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, July 9, 2007; D01

Nonprofit groups are figuring out how to dodge escalating rents in Washington's hot commercial real estate market: They're buying office condos.

Just like buyers of residential condos, groups buying office condos pay a monthly fee and own the space, typically a floor or two or three in a mid-size building, some in lofty downtown areas flush with lawyers, lobbyists and pricey restaurants.

The trend, already established in suburbs like Alexandria, is surfacing in the District, where not-for-profit groups employ 44,000 people. In the past 18 months, about a dozen nonprofits have bought or signed contracts for office condos in the District, industry experts say. Many more have expressed interest, hoping to save money in the long run and stay or move into the city, close to the action.

"There's always been a slow boil for commercial condos [for] associations in the suburbs. We're now at a fast boil for that activity in the District," said Richard A. Newman, an attorney with the D.C. law firm Arent Fox who deals with nonprofits. "This is on everybody's lips. This is a happening product right now."

The heightened interest comes as rents are rising. In the District's central business district, for example, the average asking rent in the second quarter of this year was $45.63 per square foot, up 13.2 percent from the corresponding quarter last year, according to CB Richard Ellis, a real estate firm.

In Old Town Alexandria, the asking rent averaged $30.87 per square foot in the second quarter, up 4.2 percent over the second quarter last year.

"It's obviously cheaper to rent out in the suburbs" or buy outside the District, said Lisa Schreiber, senior vice president of SunTrust Bank. "But there's always an appeal in Washington to have that address for lobbying efforts and other things."

For many nonprofits, like the Jesuit Conference, buying an office condo not only means saving money long term but enjoying stability while investing in the city.

After leasing for about 30 years and bouncing around different locations in the District, the Jesuit Conference recently signed a contract to buy four floors of office space -- 17,500 square feet in all -- on 16th Street NW between K and L streets, just blocks from the White House.

"After 30 years of leasing we would be better off had we bought, dealing with the realities of the Washington, D.C., leases," said the Rev. Tom Gaunt, executive secretary of the organization. "The immediate cost will be more in the initial years. We're fully expecting savings seven to 10 years out. We'll be paying less than if we kept renewing our current lease."

Eugene Kenney, vice president of Akridge, a local developer that bought the building on 16th Street NW last year, said many developers are targeting nonprofits because they're a good fit for the available small office condos, and many have access to tax-exempt financing, making the deal even better.

According to the Washington D.C. Economic Partnership, which gets information from the CoStar Group, a research group in Bethesda, said about 12 office buildings in the District are selling office condos. Rates range from $356 to $900 per square foot.

Industry experts say an increasing number of nonprofits are looking into buying office condos in the District but may have to settle for space further from the central business district because of the limited options. And many office building owners are happy to lease instead of sell space because rents are so high.

Thomas Fulcher Jr., executive vice president at Studley, a commercial real estate brokerage firm that represents tenants, said there can be a downside to all this. Organizations have to put up a lot of capital and may be limiting their ability to grow, he said. And if they decide to sell, "the price could go down, and you could lose money."

The new trend has pleased District officials.

"We're really interested in having nonprofits stay in the District, and I think this is a great way to do so," said Sean Madigan, spokesman for the office of the deputy mayor for planning and economic development.

Some medical and dental offices have also recently bought condo offices in the District, a trend established in the suburbs. Industry experts say law offices, however, which lease large amounts of office space, have shied away from buying because partners leave often, and it is difficult to divide the property.

Some well-heeled organizations are still buying entire buildings. AARP bought a 10-story building at 6th and E streets NW in 2000 and sold two condo office floors to its foundation in 2004.

Eric Osberg, vice president and treasurer of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, which researches educational policy, sees great benefit to his group buying two top floors in the 16th Street NW building owned by Akridge totaling 8,800 square feet.

He said part of the space may even be used as an event room.

"We wanted to have more permanence and have more control over" the use of our space, he said.


The Jesuit Conference recently signed a contract to buy four floors
of office space in a building on 16th Street NW.
(By Dennis Brack -- The Washington Post)


Allan Lengel covers commercial real estate. His e-mail address islengela@washpost.com.

Copyright 2007 The Washington Post Co.
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Old July 9th, 2007, 10:24 PM   #751
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pennster View Post
Landover May Be Next On Revival Bandwagon
Ambitious Proposal Channels Bethesda


By Ovetta Wiggins
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, July 9, 2007; B01

Prince George's County officials are pushing an ambitious plan to transform downtown Landover, home of the Washington Redskins, into a Bethesda-like space where people can sip lattes at sidewalk cafes and dine at upscale restaurants.

A rubble-filled lot just inside the Capital Beltway where the bustling Landover Mall once stood would be replaced with luxury townhouses, trendy stores and office buildings. Two nearby apartment buildings, built nearly four decades ago, would be demolished. New construction would replace them, and the residents who occupy the 1,000 units would be relocated.

"This is going to be a major project," said County Council member David Harrington (D-Cheverly), who represents the Landover area. "The importance of this plan is that it sets in motion a vision for this area."

The development, which is in the very early planning stages, is the latest attempt to breathe new life into the inner and older suburbs of Prince George's, where District residents flocked in the 1960s and '70s for sprawling green lawns, trees and affordable housing. The area has changed, however, in the past couple of decades: Crime rates have risen, housing stock has eroded and student academic performance has slipped.

"We have some of the crime stuff, the transient kind of moving," said Sylvester Vaughns, 71, a member of the county planning board and longtime Landover resident.

The proposal to transform Landover into a residential and cultural hub is an example of what is happening in inside-the-Beltway communities throughout the county, with private-public development projects boosting the profiles of areas including Hyattsville and Suitland.

For example, a two-mile strip in Hyattsville that was once filled with auto repair shops and liquor stores is being reshaped into an arts and entertainment district, where condominiums with lofts are being marketed to artists.

Farther south, Suitland Manor, a 33-acre complex of barracks-style apartments, is being demolished, and an $80 million development of single-family houses, condominiums and rental apartments will be built. County officials say a developer will soon be selected for the project, part of an overall residential and commercial center in Suitland.

Harrington said the Landover development hinges on a commitment from Lerner Corp., which owns the mall property. Lerner's 88 acres cover more than two-thirds of the area being considered for development.

"We're very much on board," said Joel Rozner, an attorney for Lerner.

Over the years, Lerner has been approached at different times with proposals to relocate the county seat, school board headquarters and Prince George's Hospital Center to its site off Brightseat Road. Lerner showed interest, but none of the proposals came to fruition.

Rozner said that the company wants a "vibrant mixed-used development" on the property and that the current plans are a "work in progress."

Planners are drafting the Landover Gateway Sector Plan, which would cover the demolished mall site, two aging apartment complexes, the Landover Crossing Shopping Center -- a half-empty complex with a liquor store, nail salon and barbecue takeout restaurant -- and a nearby abandoned used-car dealership. The county would need to make a zoning change in the area from commercial and residential to mixed use.

For years, community activists and residents of Landover, which includes the neighborhoods of Palmer Park, Kentland, Glenarden and Brightseat, have urged the county to push for revitalization of the area.

Diane McGlone, 53, said she wants beauty and jobs brought back to the area.

The Palmer Park resident remembers shopping, going to dinner and seeing movies at Landover Mall, which sits at the Capital Beltway and Landover Road, during its heyday in the mid-1970s.

The mall, with Garfinckels, Woodward & Lothrop and Hecht's as its anchors, was a landmark in the county for three decades. Before Bowie Town Center was built, people from across the region converged on the mall, which provided shoppers with the type of quality stores offered in nearby Montgomery and Fairfax counties.

But a stabbing on mall property, a shooting at a nearby apartment complex that left five people dead and a surge in overall crime in the area in the late 1980s and early 1990s frightened shoppers and eventually helped fuel the mall's rapid decline.

By the time the mall closed in 2002, it had been reduced to a shell of its former self, its fashionable stores replaced with others selling items for a dollar, McGlone said. Only Sears remains of what used to be Landover Mall.

"Whatever they do, it will be beneficial for the community," McGlone said.

But not everyone is so certain.

Glenarden Mayor John W. Anderson said he is worried about the thousands of people, many of them low-income, who will be forced from their homes.

"Where are they going to go?" Anderson asked. "Somebody needs to be concerned about that. . . . It's not that I'm not advocating for development, but you have to also be concerned about the people who are going to be displaced."

Arthur Berlin, general partner of the Maple Ridge Apartments, which has more than 400 units, said he is interested not in selling his property, but in improving it. Berlin said he'd like to see a more upscale community, but he also wants "to make sure long-term tenants are able to react to the situation."

Harrington said the redevelopment of the area is designed to complement the nearly $1 billion mixed-use development being built less than two miles away, known as Woodmore Towne Centre at Glenarden. The 245-acre development, set to open next year, will include condominiums, a hotel, office space and a Wegmans grocery store.

"The two areas would strengthen each other," said Christine Osei, a county planner who is working on the Landover plan.

Osei said an outline of the development should be finished by the end of the year. A public hearing is expected to be held in February, and the council will consider it for final approval at the end of next year, according to the projected timetable.

Current Site:

The Landover Mall site covers most of the area planners want to develop.
The plan hinges on a commitment from its owner, Lerner Corp.,
an official said. (Maryland-national Capital Park And Planning Commission)


Concept Rendering:

Rendering of envisioned development for the area behind Landover Mall.
Prince George's officials are endorsing the development of the area.
Courtesy of washingtonpost.com


Copyright 2007 The Washington Post Co.
I've been at the edge of my seat anticipating the arrival of such a plan for Landover.

I wonder if the naysayers crying for the abolishment of FedEx Field would say the same thing if such an area existed today.

The suburban nature around the stadium was always a main point of argument to get rid of it.
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Old July 9th, 2007, 11:28 PM   #752
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FedEx Field isn't going anywhere anytime soon. Too much money and lobbying went into it, and you can believe there would be cries of foulplay by DC residents if Snyder tried to move the team back into DC proper given that he'd probably ask for public assistance.

The only sticking point about this plan is that it has to be smart and big enough to be a huge draw when the Skins aren't playing at home. Prince George's has a lot of thinking and planning to do. All these mini "cities" being built from the ground up in one fell swoop may have enormous impacts on the county's long term welfare in terms of transportation networks and environmental impact, and the county's planning department isn't exactly renowned for (or used to) making plans like this. It especially needs to have adequate public transit infrastructure (it's not exactly close to Landover Metro station) and a street grid that encourages walking, biking, or public transit over personal motor vehicles.
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Old July 10th, 2007, 09:49 PM   #753
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Pennster,

I agree with 100%. They need more development around New Carrollton, Landover and Cheverly metro stations. I'm glad they are trying to do something with the mall space but I'm not too sure if it will be a complete success.
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Old July 10th, 2007, 11:13 PM   #754
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I love the ideas they are putting out there for landover, but I dont agree with the idea of tearing those apartment complexes down. I have lived in those apartment complexes before and they are not completely bad, its just ridden with section 8 people who dont care about the community. Maple Ridge Apartments adjacent to Glenarden Apartments has actually made efforts to reduce crimes and thugs coming in and out of the complex by putting up a fence.

I dont know how this will affect everyone who lives in those apartment complexes but if it is necessary to tear them down I hope something nice replaces it. I like the idea of making a mini "city" there it would be good for the people coming to and from the redskins game, and people wouldnt have to travel away from their path to get to the boulevard or bowie town center. I hope this plan goes through.
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Old July 10th, 2007, 11:27 PM   #755
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Here is some extra information and PDF presentations with alot more images, check out part 1,2, and 3. There is alot more information in there than in the articles about transportation, zonings, etc.

The renderings in part 3 PDF look beautiful, I love the way they envision it to look. I would definitely move back to landover if this is what it looked like.

http://www.mncppc.org/cpd/LandOverGateway/
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Old July 11th, 2007, 04:53 PM   #756
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Thanks for the link, CityMassa. This plan WOULD be fantastic, but I think the biggest challenge may be in trying to find tenants to occupy all those hypothetical office buildings. This project will definitely have to be implemented in phases, possibly slower than most people would like. I can't see it looking like this until maybe 10-15 years have passed unless the county (or developer) can find office tenants for what looks like about 2 million sq ft of space. And until those buildings are built, the ground floor retail will be a bust, especially if the residential buildings haven't been constructed yet (and what type of person is going to move there without nearby retail and offices anyway?--my guess is an auto-centric person who wouldn't be looking to move there because of convenience to jobs or shops). I'm looking forward to hearing how the county plans to get this underway because a plan conceptually defining land uses is one thing--an actual implementation plan including RFPs and a construction timetable is another. I'm also confused and apprehensive about some of the "examples" they used in Part 2. I'm pleased about some, but disappointed in others.

Last edited by pennster; July 11th, 2007 at 05:01 PM.
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Old July 11th, 2007, 08:13 PM   #757
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White Flint Continues to Grow Taller

Wednesday, July 11, 2007

Buildings continue to go up as area’s future comes into focus

Initial plans for a new 16-story high-rise apartment building goes before the Planning Board Thursday


by Patrick Dunne | Staff Writer

Initial plans for a new high-rise apartment building adjacent the White Flint Metro station will go before the Planning Board Thursday.

White Flint View, a 16-story apartment building would be located just east of the Rockville Pike and Nichols Lane intersection, and next to the Metro station parking garage.

The building will have 183 apartments, at least 21 moderately priced dwelling units and 29,500 square feet of retail space on the ground level.

County planner Dolores Kinney said the mixed use of commercial and residential space is exactly what planners hope to see around Metro stations.

‘‘This is a special zone ... found around all Metro stations in the county,” she said on Tuesday. ‘‘It encourages pedestrian-type activities and access to the Metro stations with a mix of residential and commercial uses.”

The proposed development was already factored into the county’s White Flint Sector Plan update, a 20-year growth guide for residential and commercial development around the White Flint Metro Station.

The Naples Commercial LLC project would be built after razing a plumbing and heating supply store currently at the Nicholson Lane space.

County planner Margaret Rifkin, has said the goal of the sector plan update is to mix housing and businesses to make White Flint a destination spot. The first draft of the sector plan, last updated as part of the1992 North Bethesda⁄Garrett Park Master Plan, is expected to be finished this fall.

The developer plans to build an underground parking deck beneath White Flint View, but the number of spaces and traffic flow would be detailed in the final site plan.

One traffic improvement will be to Citadel Avenue which dead ends in front of the White Flint View property now.

Kinney said the county is planning to extend the avenue from Marinelli Road south to Nicholson Lane, and connect to Huff Court. Naples Commercial LLC would have to contribute to the construction and add handicap-accessible ramps and curbs to the sidewalks along Citadel Avenue.

Also on Thursday, the Planning Board will discuss an application from developer Donohoe Companies Inc. to change the in-building leasing offices at the Gallery at White Flint Place into 2,400 square feet of new retail or commercial space.

According to the proposal, the building is sold out and the leasing office can be used for stores that would benefit residents in the three high-rises of the apartment complex at Rockville Pike and Old Georgetown Road.

If You Go

The Montgomery County Planning Board will discuss White Flint View, a new apartment building proposed near the White Flint Metro station at 9 a.m. Thursday at 8787 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring. Visit www.montgomeryplanning.org.

Copyright 2007 Post-Newsweek Media, Inc./Gazette.Net
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Old July 11th, 2007, 08:34 PM   #758
modestproposal
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Interesting article, however I believe there are some factual inaccuracies. The White Flint Metro Station Parking Garage is on Marinelli, not Nicholson. I believe this project will actually be built next to the MetroBus parking garage, which is on Nicholson. This site is not adjacent to the Metro station, it's more like a 3 minute walk around the Nuclear Regulator Commission buildings.

There's a new zoning request sign up just west of the Nicholson/Rockville Pike intersection at what is currently a strip mall.
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Old July 11th, 2007, 08:44 PM   #759
modestproposal
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The red box is where I think the proposal is. The #1 is where the zoning request sign is. #2 is where the White Flint Metro Station is.

Right next to the Metro Station is North Bethesda Center. Just South of the #1 is where White Flint Crossing is. Just North of the #2 is where the brand new Gallery at White Flint Place and The Sterling are.
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Old July 11th, 2007, 09:03 PM   #760
pennster
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I think they actually meant MetroBus parking lot. I'm looking for renderings of White Flint Plaza here but I'll have to wait til my cubicle neighbor returns to ask if she's got any. Same goes for White Flint Crossing rumors about JBG wanting to build 450' high (as far as I know, they're still pushing ahead with the 288' proposal, so I wouldn't get your hopes up, so to speak).

In other news, here at the Planning Dept I just saw a picture of what the residential building will look like at downtown Bethesda's Metro Center development where the food court still stands. A 200-foot bore, is how I'd best describe it. C'mon people, let's get some better architecture!!!
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