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Old April 23rd, 2006, 09:08 AM   #21
dchengg
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In vancouver, i have known two incidents a few years ago, it was about people falling into the tracks... and i think one of the two accidents, happened in Stadium Station
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 09:33 AM   #22
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Toronto's Russel Hill subway crash is the deadliest of accidents, but the worst accident in Toronto's subway IMO is the great fire that originated somewhere near the Greenwood Yard. Tires or something rubber caught fire and the non-stop tunnels between the west side of Victoria Park subway station and the Bloor Viaduct West of Broadview subway station were completely flooded with smoke. Broadview and Victoria Park might have been confused for an incinerator considering the volume of smoke bursting out of their underground-surface transitions, the whole system was shut down just as rush hour's peak was in effect. Across the eastern half of the city, the numerous subway vents in the sidewalks became black towers visible from some distance. The system was miraculously running on schedule the next morning in a very damp condition with lots of soot still visible. The people on the train that got closest to the fire between Donlands and Pape stations were all safely evacuated at Pape. No deaths, some smoke inhalation treatments. My mother just missed that train from Pape station that day as well (she held onto that transfer from Pape for a while).

Tokyo's isn't safest. Last year there was a crash at a level crossing on the Toubu Isesaki line that resulted in death. That's commuter rather than subway, but runs through-service on subway lines. With 2 exceptions, Tokyo's system doesn't use 3rd-rail.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 02:14 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommygunn
[/IMG] [/IMG]
Kings Cross london 33 people died most of them firemen cause unknown think may of been cigarette
Most weren't firemen!!! I think only one died of the 31 (not 33) victims.

This wasn't the worst peace-time accident anyway, that was the Moorgate disaster in 1975 when a train failed to stop at the terminus platform and rammed into the dead-end tunnel at 30mph, killing 43. The train 'telescoped' and the front car was crushed to a length of just 3 feet (1m).

By far the worst accident of all was in 1943 at the then unopened Bethnal Green Station during an air raid. As people were flocking into the station to shelter from the raid a woman tripped on the stairs and 173 people were crushed in the resulting stampede.

There was another terrible wartime disaster involving people sheltering from an air raid, I believe it was at Balham in South London. A bomb landed on the main road above the station and penetrated the concourse roof and a sewer, sending millions of gallons of sewerage down the escalators and flooding the platforms, drowing scores of people in sewerage.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 09:02 PM   #24
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Granville railway disaster

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granville_train_disaster

On January 18, 1977, Australia experienced its worst ever railway disaster at Granville, a suburb of Sydney, New South Wales.

The crowded 6.09 a.m. commuter train from Mount Victoria in the Blue Mountains to Sydney left the rails and hit a row of supports of an overhead road bridge constructed from concrete and steel. The derailed engine car and carriages one and two passed the bridge. The locomotive and carriage one broke free from the other carriages, hitting a metal pole, which tore through carriage one killing eight passengers. The remaining carriages ground to a halt with carriage two clear of the bridge, and the rear two-thirds of carriage three and forward third of carriage four under it. With its supports demolished, the bridge and several motor cars on top of it crashed down onto carriages three and four, crushing them and the passengers inside.

In all 83 people died and more than 200 were badly injured. Many of those who died were killed instantly when the bridge crushed them in their seats. The passengers killed were all in carriages one, three and four. Incredibly, some of the survivors were in the carriages crushed by the bridge and saw people one seat ahead killed. The train driver and the secondman, and the motorists on the bridge all survived. There were also a number of people trapped in the train for hours after the accident by part of the bridge crushing a limb or torso. Many of these people were conscious and lucid talking to rescuers, but died of crush syndrome soon after the crushing weight was removed from their bodies due to the sudden release of toxins having built up in the limb suddenly overloading the kidneys. This resulted in changes to rescue procedures for these kinds of accidents.

Many police officers who attended the scene never received appropriate counselling after cleaning up after the horrific accident.

An Australian movie made in 1998, The Day of the Roses, follows the coronial investigation. Coroner Tom Weir was corresponding with Beyond Television Productions about the pressure applied on him during inquest into the disaster before his sudden death from bowel cancer in 1996.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 07:10 AM   #25
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In 2000 a subway on the Hibiya Line in Tokyo swiped a train that had derailed previously, killing 5 people. It was a huge shock to the Japanese, because everyone uses trains daily and there hadn't been an accident for some time.

I don't know of any other subway-specific accidents in Tokyo that resulted in death... of course there was the sarin gas attack by that doomsday cult.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 07:21 AM   #26
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though this is not my city

Daegu subway fire

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daegu_subway_fire

The Daegu subway fire of February 18, 2003 killed at least 198 people and injured at least 147. An arsonist set fire to a train stopped at the Joongang-ro (or Jungang-ro) station of the Daegu Metropolitan Subway in Daegu, South Korea. The fire then spread to a second train which had entered the station from the opposite direction.

The arsonist was Kim Dae-han, a 56 year-old unemployed former taxi driver who had suffered a stroke in November 2001 that left him partly paralyzed. Kim was dissatisfied with his medical treatment and had expressed sentiments of violence and depression; he later told police he wanted to kill himself, but to do so in a crowded place rather than alone. By most accounts, on the morning of February 18, he boarded train 1079 on Line 1 in the direction of Daegok, carrying a duffle bag which contained two green milk cartons filled with a flammable liquid, possibly paint thinner or gasoline.

As the train left Daegu Yeok station around 9:53 a.m., Kim began fumbling with the cartons and a cigarette lighter, alarming other passengers who tried to stop him. In the struggle, one of the cartons spilled and its liquid contents caught fire as the train pulled into Joongang-ro station in downtown Daegu. Kim, his back and legs on fire, managed to escape along with many passengers on train 1079, but within two minutes the fire had spread to all six cars. The seats and flooring were composed of flammable fiberglass, carbonated vinyl, and polyethylene, and produced thick, chemical smoke as it burned.

The operator of the train failed to notify subway officials immediately of the fire.

Smoke being visible on their closed-circuit television monitors, subway officials radioed the operator of train 1080, Choi Sang-yeol, advising him to proceed with caution because there was a fire in the station. Train 1080 entered Joongang-ro station and stopped alongside blazing train 1079 approximately four minutes later. The doors opened only briefly, then shut, apparently in an effort to keep out the toxic smoke that had filled the station. Shortly after train 1080's arrival, an automatic fire detector shut down the power supply to both trains, preventing train 1080 from leaving the station.

Transcripts show Choi Sang-yeol made three announcements advising passengers in train 1080 to remain seated while he attempted to reach superiors. Finally, he was advised "Quickly, run somewhere else. Go up. . . kill the engine and go." Choi then opened the doors and fled, but in doing so he removed the master key, shutting down the onboard batteries which powered the train doors— effectively sealing passengers inside. Later investigation showed 79 passengers remained trapped inside train 1080 and died there.

Inadequate emergency equipment also worsened the disaster. Daegu subway trains were not equipped with fire extinguishers, and the stations lacked sprinklers and emergency lighting. Many victims became disoriented in the dark, smoke-filled underground station and died of asphyxiation looking for exits. Emergency ventilation systems also proved inadequate. Over 1,300 fire and emergency personnel responded and the fire itself was extinguished around 1:25 p.m.; however, the toxicity of the smoke prevented them from entering the station for another three and a half hours

The intensity of the fire made it difficult to accurately assess the number of victims. Most were burned beyond recognition, many to the bone, and required DNA analysis to identify. A total of 191 bodies were found and identified; 6 additional bodies were found but so thoroughly destroyed that they could not be identified; and one person's possessions were identified but remains could not be located.

As the incident occurred late in the morning rush hour, most of the victims were students or young women who worked in the downtown district's department stores, which opened at 10:30 a.m. Many were able to contact loved ones on their mobile phones, and mobile phone operators released call connection and attempt records to help authorities determine who was in the station.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 09:02 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRZ
Toronto's Russel Hill subway crash is the deadliest of accidents, but the worst accident in Toronto's subway IMO is the great fire that originated somewhere near the Greenwood Yard. Tires or something rubber caught fire and the non-stop tunnels between the west side of Victoria Park subway station and the Bloor Viaduct West of Broadview subway station were completely flooded with smoke. Broadview and Victoria Park might have been confused for an incinerator considering the volume of smoke bursting out of their underground-surface transitions, the whole system was shut down just as rush hour's peak was in effect. Across the eastern half of the city, the numerous subway vents in the sidewalks became black towers visible from some distance. The system was miraculously running on schedule the next morning in a very damp condition with lots of soot still visible. The people on the train that got closest to the fire between Donlands and Pape stations were all safely evacuated at Pape. No deaths, some smoke inhalation treatments. My mother just missed that train from Pape station that day as well (she held onto that transfer from Pape for a while).

Tokyo's isn't safest. Last year there was a crash at a level crossing on the Toubu Isesaki line that resulted in death. That's commuter rather than subway, but runs through-service on subway lines. With 2 exceptions, Tokyo's system doesn't use 3rd-rail.
That was in 1997 right? My mother happened to be on the train that got evacuated at Donlands Station. I think it's "exaggerated" that smoke was coming out of every vent between Main and Broadview.

The fire was on the tracks between Greenwood and Donlands and those were mainly the stations that had to have the soot cleaned.
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Old April 24th, 2006, 01:40 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhuwman
Daegu subway fire
Yes I remember that, it was awful

What the hell were they playing at constructing metro cars out of flammable materials though?
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Old April 24th, 2006, 08:30 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
Yes I remember that, it was awful

What the hell were they playing at constructing metro cars out of flammable materials though?
yeah.. stupidity calls for disasters
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Old May 17th, 2006, 12:47 PM   #30
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Melbourne: 44 killed, over 400 injured.

Purists may discount this, since although it occurred within the Metropolitan area, it involved two "country" trains.

On Easter Monday, April 20th, 1908, the Bendigo to Melbourne train ploughed into the back of the Ballarat to Melbourne train at "Braybrook Junction", about 10 km West of Melbourne. Both trains were full of holiday-makers returning to Melbourne after the Easter holiday. Hence the horrendous loss of life already quoted.

The Ballarat train was stationary at the "Up" platform. The Bendigo train crashed directly into the back of it: the line runs straight for many km back, but it was after dark.

As a result of this, the name "Braybrook Junction" took on a dark shadow in the mind of the community. In consequence, it was renamed "Sunshine".
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Old May 17th, 2006, 12:52 PM   #31
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Do Australians have any understanding as to what a subway is, other than the local shop that makes rolls? That is definitely not a subway accident, nor is the Granville Disaster, although both were bad.
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Old May 17th, 2006, 01:58 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AG
Do Australians have any understanding as to what a subway is, other than the local shop that makes rolls? That is definitely not a subway accident, nor is the Granville Disaster, although both were bad.
Sorry ... I misread the Thread title.
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Old May 18th, 2006, 03:15 AM   #33
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The worst subway accident, by far was in Baku in 1994, where a fire killed 300 people...
http://www.azer.com/aiweb/categories.../34_metro.html

On October 28, 1995, the worst Metro tragedy in world history took place in Baku when fire broke out on a Saturday evening rush hour train. For the majority of the 300 victims, death was swift. Deadly fumes of carbon monoxide poisoning from the burning synthetic materials in the cars overpowered them in a matter of minutes. The impact of the accident stunned the city as the latest in a string of disasters.

[snip]

According to Swedish experts who investigated the Metro accident, the fire started accidentally from an electrical spark in wiring near gears under one of the cars. Since Azerbaijan's Metro is nearly 30 years old, the cars are manufactured from materials that are prone to give off noxious fumes if they catch fire: fully 90 percent of the material is flammable.

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Old May 18th, 2006, 06:46 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by York Transit
That was in 1997 right? My mother happened to be on the train that got evacuated at Donlands Station. I think it's "exaggerated" that smoke was coming out of every vent between Main and Broadview.

The fire was on the tracks between Greenwood and Donlands and those were mainly the stations that had to have the soot cleaned.
Yeah, it was 1997. I wouldn't call it an exageration though, the news showed proof at Vic Park and the viaduct, as well as various shots in between near subway station entrances where vents are most obvious. Woodbine station was very damp with some traces of soot the next morning, so it did spread at least a couple of stations in each direction. The fire wasn't so much on the tracks but from the yard, I heard - remember the access to the Greenwood subway yard is between Donlands and Greenwood, where the trains do a weird hump in opposite directions.
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Old May 18th, 2006, 11:27 PM   #35
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Feb 28 1975 (when I was still living in England) .... the crash at Moorgate that kileld 43 people read here. I remember that after that, it was mandatory for trains to come to a stop before entering the last station on a subway line. This one had crashed into the wall.
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Old May 18th, 2006, 11:44 PM   #36
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[QUOTE=Palal]The worst subway accident, by far was in Baku in 1994, where a fire killed 300 people...
http://www.azer.com/aiweb/categories.../34_metro.html

On October 28, 1995, the worst Metro tragedy in world history took place in Baku when fire broke out on a Saturday evening rush hour train. For the majority of the 300 victims, death was swift. Deadly fumes of carbon monoxide poisoning from the burning synthetic materials in the cars overpowered them in a matter of minutes. The impact of the accident stunned the city as the latest in a string of disasters.


That must have been really terrible!

Hopefully, over the past decades, some of the Azerbajians's oil revenues have been used to upgrade Baku's public transit.
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Old August 23rd, 2006, 06:12 PM   #37
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Toronto subway collision

I was in the subway accident August 11,1995 and actually went to the site two weeks ago to lay flowers as I do every year. To this day I cannot go back on the subway. My son who was 5 at the time along with me were trapped for 3 hours that awful night.
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Old August 23rd, 2006, 06:15 PM   #38
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I was in the subway crash in Toronto August 11,1995 and to this day cannot go back on the subway. My son and I were trapped for three hours that night.
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Old August 23rd, 2006, 06:25 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by York Transit
http://ms.radio-canada.ca/archives/2...9950813et1.wmv

In 1995, 2 Toronto TTC trains crashed in rush hour and 3 women were killed. The worst accident ever to happen. Before the accident, this system was deemed the one of the world's safest subway systems.

Post your cities...
I was in that crash (my son was 5 at the time), we were trapped for 3 hours and to this day I haven't went back on the subway, it was horrible.
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Old August 24th, 2006, 12:11 AM   #40
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The most bizarre (though not the worst) accident I've heard of is one that happened in 1950 on the Wuppertal suspended monorail. That metro-like railway runs mostly about 12 meters above the river bed:

A circus that visited the city wanted to make some spectacular advertising for their shows and arranged a ride on the monorail with one of their circus elephants. Once on the train, the elephant became a little nervous, so it broke through the cabin window and fell into the river. The river is very shallow there but magically the elephant did not get injured.
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