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View Poll Results: left, center or right aligned?
Left aligned 12 28.57%
Center aligned 10 23.81%
Right aligned 0 0%
mixed (overhead center, exit left aligned) 19 45.24%
i don't look at the signage anyway 1 2.38%
Voters: 42. You may not vote on this poll

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Old July 12th, 2008, 06:38 PM   #481
Mateusz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth View Post
Do these roads ban the usual things, like pedestrians, learner drivers, low power vehicles etc?
Yes They do, that is what they meant for, motor-only traffic

But they don't ban learner drivers in Poland
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Old July 12th, 2008, 06:38 PM   #482
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PLH View Post
POLAND:

Highways:





Expressways:



And in addition



European route




Droga krajowa / National road




Droga wojewódzka / Voivodship road

Last edited by Mateusz; July 12th, 2008 at 06:57 PM.
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Old July 12th, 2008, 06:38 PM   #483
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Learner drivers are nowhere banned in the Netherlands. However, slow vehicles and non-motorized vehicles are not allowed to enter.
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Old July 14th, 2008, 01:27 PM   #484
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
Learner drivers are nowhere banned in the Netherlands. However, slow vehicles and non-motorized vehicles are not allowed to enter.
Much the same in Norway. Bans used to be at the discretion of the local police, which meant that you could use motorways in some counties and not in others. Rather confusing, so the system was changed.
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Old July 14th, 2008, 06:33 PM   #485
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in Croatia also learning drivers are not banned at motorways. and difference between motorwayand expressway here is: 3.75-3.5 wide lanes, expressways don't have sos lane, 130/110 km/h speed limit, shorter entrance and exit ramps at expressways, more narrow curves at exit ramps at expressways, more often exits
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Old July 15th, 2008, 08:13 PM   #486
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Portugal

Highways


Expressways


Markers:



1st: Highway/Motorway
2nd and 3rd: Expressways (IP and IC)
4th: National Road
5th: Local Road
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Old August 1st, 2008, 04:08 PM   #487
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADCS View Post
Nah, it's divided into halves, thirds, quarters, eighths, etc. much more easily than tenths. If we had a different number of fingers other than ten, we would certainly use a different base counting system, not to mention a different form of the metric system (though it would probably be similar in mechanism). Face it, mathematically, ten is not a very useful number, evenly divisible only by itself, two, five and one. Twelve, for example, is evenly divisible by itself, six, four, three, two and one.
Somebody always mentions the easy divisibility of 12 as one of the advantages of the Imperial system, but the foot is about the only Imperial unit that divides neatly by 12!

1/12 of a mile is 2/3 of a furlong, or 6 2/3 chains, or 146 2/3 yards.
1/12 of a furlong is 5/6 of a chain, or 18 1/3 yards.
1/12 of a chain is 1 5/6 yards.

1/12 of an acre is 403 1/3 square yards.

1/12 of a UK ton is 13 1/3 stone, or 186 2/3 pounds.
1/12 of a US ton is 166 2/3 pounds.
1/12 of a stone is 1 1/7 pounds.
1/12 of a pound is 1 1/3 ounces.

1/12 of a gallon is 2/3 of a pint.
1/12 of a UK pint is 1 2/3 fluid ounces.
1/12 of a US pint is 1 1/3 fluid ounces.
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Old August 1st, 2008, 08:20 PM   #488
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In cities along US - Mexico border, people form both sides have to deal with constant conversions between metric / imperial.

when mexicans go to the US and drive, buy gas or want to know the temperature, they must switch to imperial.. and same with americans going south of the border. for instance, with the recent dramatic increases in US gas, americans cross to, say, Tijuana, and must calculate how many liters of gas per dollar... and mexicans go for grocery shopping to San Diego, and get several gallons of juice or milk.

the point is, people on both sides of the line are constantly converting measures, and therefore they do it automatically... just a little practice is needed.

but i totally support the idea of a merticized world
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Old August 2nd, 2008, 01:44 AM   #489
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr pollo View Post
In cities along US - Mexico border, people form both sides have to deal with constant conversions between metric / imperial.

when mexicans go to the US and drive, buy gas or want to know the temperature, they must switch to imperial.. and same with americans going south of the border. for instance, with the recent dramatic increases in US gas, americans cross to, say, Tijuana, and must calculate how many liters of gas per dollar... and mexicans go for grocery shopping to San Diego, and get several gallons of juice or milk.

the point is, people on both sides of the line are constantly converting measures, and therefore they do it automatically... just a little practice is needed.

but i totally support the idea of a merticized world
Can worldly, cosmopolitan, progressive and heavily Mexican influenced states like California switch to metric on their own, or does federal law prohibit individual states from acting alone on these things?
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Old August 2nd, 2008, 06:30 AM   #490
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutterbug View Post
Can worldly, cosmopolitan, progressive and heavily Mexican influenced states like California switch to metric on their own, or does federal law prohibit individual states from acting alone on these things?
There are *NO* legal restrictions on doing so, only the political will (or lack thereof). There is also a very strong inertia at work here, as well as the question of who would pay for it.

Mike
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Old August 2nd, 2008, 10:19 AM   #491
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I found out the exit numbering of the Delaware Route 1 is also based on kilometers
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Old August 2nd, 2008, 10:26 AM   #492
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Any pics of the signs with metric on them?
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Old August 2nd, 2008, 10:29 AM   #493
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It looks like this on the DE-1
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Old August 2nd, 2008, 10:30 AM   #494
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And like this on the Southbound I-19
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Old August 2nd, 2008, 11:43 PM   #495
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Title 15 United States Code, Section 204 (enacted on 1866-07-28), reads:

"§ 204. Metric system authorized

It shall be lawful throughout the United States of America to employ the weights and measures of the metric system; and no contract or dealing, or pleading in any court, shall be deemed invalid or liable to objection because the weights or measures expressed or referred to therein are weights or measures of the metric system."

For a brief discussion on this, see:
http://lamar.colostate.edu/~hillger/...etric-act.html

Thus, for example, you can file a property deed measured in meters and hectares in ANY local registrars' office in the USA and if they object, you have sound legal footing under which to go by.



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Old August 3rd, 2008, 01:45 AM   #496
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Never knew that, thanks guys.
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Old August 3rd, 2008, 06:07 AM   #497
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So do you think the Imperial system is here to stay? Or would a state like California seek to convert over to metric, and doing that would lead to likely a nationwide conversion over to metric?

I, as a Canadian, who goes to the USA frequently, and understands imperial measurement and can convert distances and temperatures, and gas prices in his head, still wishes the US would go Metric. honestly, simply highway driving, using the shorter kilometers just is better, it makes distances seem shorter, I don't know why. It just does.
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Old August 17th, 2008, 04:42 AM   #498
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seawastate View Post


Post any other examples of confusing signs you see.
The section of railway coming up is single track. The driver of the locomotive MUST obtain the " staff" or token before entering the single track section.There is only ONE " staff" so if you have it there cant be another train in the one track section.
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Old August 17th, 2008, 04:48 AM   #499
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I dont have a picture but here's a weird piece of signage from the State of Maine.
Driving EAST on US 1, I turn RIGHT on to Maine 187. The first sign I see is " Maine 187 NORTH".
Confusing to say the least. Maine 187 is a loop down to the coast. At its other end, where it rejoins US 1, the sign says " Maine 187 south." Bureaucracy at its most stupid !
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Old August 25th, 2008, 05:16 PM   #500
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post
It is an interesting question. I didn't take this photo, so I don't know why the speed limit was 40 km/h.

There is a difference between the USA and Europe in a way the speed limit is set. In Europe, the speed limit may be lowered outside of populated areas to reflect the change in landscape such as the presence of dangerous curves, the width of the roadway, etc. In the USA, on the other hand, the speed limit outside of villages remains the same (e.g., 90 km/h), and should there be a curve or bent, a warning sign will be posted advising to drive with a certain speed. The official limit, however, will remain 90 km/h.

Also, within the National parks in the USA, the speed limits may be very low even though the road condition allows to drive at a much higher speed. This might just be the case.
¨

Exactly the same situation in Norway. Even more so, actually, since the system always have been built around the urban and non-urban limit (50 and 80 kph respectively). And whereas exits, junctions, schools etc very often leads to speed limit reductions (80 to 60, 50 to 40 or 30), dangerous curves etc never do. There has been a slight change to this thinking as high-risk sections see a speed limit reduction, typically 80 to 70, but this is almost always due to high AADT on an inadequate road, not curves, narrow points etc. Quite weird.
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