daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > Manchester Metro Area

Manchester Metro Area For Manchester, Salford and the surrounding area.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 18th, 2005, 11:03 AM   #21
ChrisCharlton
EnglandsNorthWest
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Castlefield, Manchester
Posts: 54
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by oscar9
Interesting read. The northern quarter is a fascinating area. but can feel intimidating IMO ,is it true they used this area in a recent film to recreate a downtown New York look?Certainly gives that feel with all the tall fire escapes and large red brick buildings.All they would need is a few dont walk signs and yellow traffic lights suspended over the road and there you have it.
Yeah - can't remember the exact streets but it was in Summer 2003, and I think Jude Law was in it.
__________________
"Live from her travel pod a mile above the centre of Great Britain..."
ChrisCharlton no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old May 18th, 2005, 11:05 AM   #22
ChrisCharlton
EnglandsNorthWest
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Castlefield, Manchester
Posts: 54
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northbeach
Top pics Chris.
I'd be interested to see any plans for High Street (which you have somehow managed to look good!!).
It's a bit 70's Warrington at the moment
We get very general planning letters through all the time concerned wit the Arndale extension. Obv the old bus station entrance is being redeveloped at the moment, and I think there will be more street facinc retail, but as far as I am aware there are no plans to extend the new Arndale cladding to this side, apart from over the main entrances to the malls.
__________________
"Live from her travel pod a mile above the centre of Great Britain..."
ChrisCharlton no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2005, 11:13 AM   #23
jcg
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 40
Likes (Received): 2

[QUOTE=ChrisCharlton]Yeah - can't remember the exact streets but it was in Summer 2003, and I think Jude Law was in it.

it was the shit remake of alfie, and used high street. it was all a bit mental, raised pavements, bagel shops, suspended traffic lights, yellow cabs, cop cars. really mental, and looked like the real thing.

the northern quarter is manchester, we've got to be careful we don't ruin what we have here. This is what most other cities in the uk are lacking, a creative heartbeat. people getting of their arses and staring businesses, brilliant, exciting and slightly edgey. just upsets me what they've done to dry.
jcg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2005, 03:34 PM   #24
dgnr8
Mmm, Danone
 
dgnr8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 1,792
Likes (Received): 10

It was filmed in the same spot as the first 2 series of Cutting It. That areas had loads of tv work the past few years. Can't remember the name of the road for the life of me though. It weren't high street anyway.
dgnr8 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2005, 03:36 PM   #25
dgnr8
Mmm, Danone
 
dgnr8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 1,792
Likes (Received): 10

Heh, sorry, it was High Street. I'm teh rubbish, roxor!!
dgnr8 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2005, 03:52 PM   #26
highriser
Registered User
 
highriser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 4,307
Likes (Received): 24

From todays MEN

Early birds catch homes
Jill Burdett

PLANS: Birchin
THE cheapest apartments in Manchester are going on sale at dawn in an attempt to catch key workers.

Designer Wayne Hemingway is launching his first residential scheme in the Northern Quarter at 6am on Thursday, May 26 - hoping to give nurses, firemen, teachers and shop workers a head start as they clock off shift or leave for work.

The Birchin, a restoration of a department store building, is opposite Affleck's Palace, the place where Hemingway and his wife Gerardine launched their cult Red or Dead clothes label in the 1980s.

He is determined that people who work in the Northern Quarter should have the chance to live there. Blackburn-born Hemingway said: "We are giving key workers an unashamed head-start and the first opportunity to buy a home in The Birchin."

With only a couple of apartments available under the magic £100,000 - one studio at £79,950 and another at £82,000 - they will have to set the alarm early to be in with a chance.

One-beds start at £114,950 and two-beds from £132,950. There is no car parking but you do get a fold-up bike.

In total the development will have 90 apartments and of the 20 released in the first phase, six have already been sold - all to first-time buyers.

Since selling their label for a substantial sum a couple of years ago the Hemingways have formed their own design consultancy and become outspoken critics of mass housing design.

They are already working with Wimpey in the north east on a large scheme to prove that big does not need to mean bland.

In Manchester they have teamed up with local company Dwell Developments to make affordable apartments right in the heart of the city centre.

Estate agents Bridgfords have been signed up to sell The Birchin and manager Martin Moston said: "This launch is extremely significant because its success could lead to other affordable housing developments, not just in Manchester but other cities too.

"I believe the demand will be high for this type of economy-minded but quality-focussed development."

The first days of the Manchester property boom saw people queuing through the night to buy apartments.

It will be an interesting indicator of the market and the confidence of first-time buyers to see how many are waiting at 6am on Thursday
highriser no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2005, 05:14 PM   #27
spacepostman
Fairy Godmother
 
spacepostman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Manchester
Posts: 542
Likes (Received): 1

Yeah I think Eastgate will have an impact on the N/4 but not as mujch as it will on the Piccadilly area. I live on Ducie St but it's definatley out of the N/4 which sort of ends at the canal basin. It is afterall a quarter not a half hehe
spacepostman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2005, 06:09 PM   #28
Accura4Matalan
Registered User
 
Accura4Matalan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Manchester, UK
Posts: 12,421
Likes (Received): 364

Quote:
There is no car parking but you do get a fold-up bike.
LOL!
Accura4Matalan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2005, 08:11 PM   #29
EarlyBird
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Likes (Received):

Quote:
Originally Posted by highriser
Early birds catch homes
  Reply With Quote
Old May 19th, 2005, 12:19 AM   #30
andyains
Collar and cuffs
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Not London no more
Posts: 174
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by highriser
Affleck's Palace, the place where Hemingway and his wife Gerardine launched their cult Red or Dead clothes label in the 1980s.
Blimey, I remember when Red or Dead was in Afflecks. Showin' me age.
Off to get me pipe and slippers to go with my Hemingway grandad cardigan
andyains no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 19th, 2005, 12:45 PM   #31
caw123
Hit the north!
 
caw123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 4,678
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by highriser
Caw if you refering to a Queen is Dead tshirt try Slater's just around the corner,,i'll get some pics of the NQ next time im on a photo stroll .
Ah Slaters. Knew that was round there somewhere, been in it before but I couldn't find it the other day. Must have been hazed.
__________________
Bespoke Upper Torso Coverage Solutions

"Manchester is located in the center of Lancashire plain in northwestern England like a big circle theatre."
caw123 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 19th, 2005, 02:06 PM   #32
highriser
Registered User
 
highriser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 4,307
Likes (Received): 24

i think it's on the junction of Church St ,Newton St
highriser no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2005, 03:07 PM   #33
skit_uk
Towerholic
 
skit_uk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 1,383
Likes (Received): 6

The Heming Way

The Wayne attraction
The Red or Dead guru is creating low-cost homes in a city centre, says Jayne Dowle





PAUL COUSANS

IT’S THE STUFF of which a first-time buyer’s dreams are made. An apartment, in the middle of Manchester’s trendy Northern Quarter, for under £80,000. And it is designed by Wayne and Gerardine Hemingway, proprietors of the iconic 1980s fashion label Red or Dead turned property gurus. There must be a catch.
Well, there are only 90 of them, which start at £79,950 for a studio (from 270 sq ft ), £114,950 for a one-bedroom flat and £132,950 for a two-bedroom flat. The most expensive is about £169,500. And when The Birchin project goes on sale next week (May 26), key workers, usually priced way out of the market, will have first refusal.

“We’re going to release the apartments for sale with staggered selling times, starting at 5am to catch key workers as they come off shift: nurses, firefighters, then teachers, retail workers etc,” says Hemingway. “They will have to prove what they do, but they will be able to choose one before anyone else. We will have to keep some apartments back, obviously, because if 100 firemen turn up all at once it will end up as a firemen’s hostel.”



Investors, he says, are to be held at bay. Quite how he and the property company Dwell Developments, with which the Hemingways are collaborating, plan to do this without the help of guard dogs is unclear.

Blackburn-born Hemingway, who sold Red or Dead for a multimillion-pound sum at the end of the 1990s, is committed to creating stylish, affordable housing. He has collaborated with Wimpey Homes on four developments, and has set his sights on regenerating the mill towns of his native Lancashire.

Today he is in his trademark smart suit and shirt combo, in the fashionable deli Love Will Save the Day, two minutes’ walk from The Birchin. Hemingway, 45, is reminiscing about his punk years. His affection for Manchester, especially the Northern Quarter, with its converted warehouses, eclectic shops and quirky bars, is obvious. So it is fitting that The Birchin, carved out of a 1930s warehouse, is bang opposite Afflecks Palace, the market where Red or Dead opened its first shop in 1982.

The Birchin takes its name from the street it backs on to. With its tattered concert posters and jumble of architecture, it reminds you of the similarities between this part of Manchester and parts of New York. On the corner, though, is a very Northern pub, where old men sip pints through the smoke. And across the road is an unlovely multi-storey car park.

There will be no parking spaces with the apartments. Instead, each will come with a free Brompton folding bicycle, complete with, as Wayne proudly points out, a special hook for behind-the-door storage. Integrating parking into the basement would have sent building costs soaring. Hemingway insists that affordability comes before profitability. But keeping budgets as tight as possible is key to the success of this site, which was acquired for a relatively inexpensive

£2.5 million but is costing £20m in total.

“To be honest, I don’t know how they’re going to make any money out of it at all,” says Elisabeth Williams, head of new homes at Savills in Manchester. “Although values in the Northern Quarter are still some way behind the rest of central Manchester, these are very cheap apartments.”

The area has a wide variety of conversions, so it is difficult to suggest typical prices, but you would be pushed to find anything decent for less than £130,000. Across the whole of the city, including the wildest fringes of Greater Manchester, the average cost of a flat is £134,719.

So why be so altruistic? Hemingway concedes that his company, hemingwaydesign, is “brave”, but maintains: “The guys at Dwell have the same attitude as us. They are a new company and they genuinely want to leave a legacy. Dwell are taking great pride in getting things done cost-effectively. And if they can do this, and do it well, they will get respected by councils all around the North.”

Other savings instigated by Hemingway include retaining the original concrete stairs and installing a no-frills lift. “Lifts cost a fortune. Surely it’s more important to spend money on the inside of your home,” he says. The original idea was to have penthouses on top of the eighth floor. These were ditched, partly because of the extra structural costs, partly because the return on penthouses per square foot would have been uneconomical, and also having an “exclusive” level would have altered the ideology of the building.

“Gerardine and I have shied away from inner-city developments before because just about all of them are unaffordable,” says Hemingway. “They’re about rich business people being able to live in the city centre. None of the things we had been offered fitted in with our philosophy. But this is very different. We can do affordable housing in a place where normally you would pay a fortune to live.”

They can also do it because they have sourced all of the interior fittings themselves, using local suppliers where possible and companies with whom they already have working relationships. The wallpaper is produced by Graham and Brown, the kitchens come from a Blackburn company, and Formica are making the worktops, featuring unique Hemingway patterns in a choice of stripes or a knives and forks motif. “All the apartments in Manchester go for the designer names — but why should we do that . . . we are designers ourselves,” says Hemingway.

Habitat is furnishing the show apartment, each item chosen by Gerardine to reflect the neutral palette she has devised; a Lofa oatmeal textured sofa; an Our Crowd pressed steel lampshade with dancing figures. There are also plans to offer a Habitat furniture package to buyers at a discounted price, possibly even devising a way to include the cost within a mortgage.

So savings all round. But will the keen prices at The Birchin have a knock-on effect across the city centre? Elisabeth Williams thinks not, because the development is tiny compared with huge sites such as Crosby Homes’ Greenquarter, which has 1,500 units. And while there is a steady stream of buyers and investors willing to pay big money for a Manchester pad, few developers are going to slash their deals ridiculously low.

The Birchin apartments are an interesting experiment now. But they will be fascinating in a few years’ time, when they are priced to hit the resale market. Will the Hemingways’ own dream of stylish and affordable housing hold true?
skit_uk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2005, 03:13 PM   #34
Subtract
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 94
Likes (Received): 0

I feel safe and at home in the N 1/4, its full of culture and creativity and has by far the best music shops in Manchester. I stupidly turned down living in Smithfield a few months back but Its definately one place id love to live, luckily I worked around there for just over 2 years aswell.
Subtract no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 1st, 2005, 09:43 PM   #35
SleepyOne
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,091
Likes (Received): 1

'Love Saves the Day' and 'The Birchin' Building

Couple of interesting articles particularly on Northern Quarter institution, 'Love Saves the Day' - their history, their "sexy food" and, excitingly, their expansion plans.


Quote:
Savouring the day she started
Sarah Walters



LOVELY OCCUPATION: Beckie Joyce
BECKIE Joyce has never been afraid of a challenge. But she admits that not all her choices have been wise ones.

The first of them was during her early 20s, when she jumped on a flight to Naples. "I got over there and couldn't speak a word of Italian and only realised how stupid that was when I got off the plane," Beckie laughs in hindsight. "I had spotted an au pair's job in a magazine in 1988 and I went just to get away."

Fortunately, she rose to the challenge and picked up the language and a job teaching English within three months. Her trip may sound hedonistic, but Beckie is not the first woman in her family to take a leap of faith into a career.

The 36-year-old is the third in a line of successful businesswomen; she follows her grandmother, who ran a number of Maid Marian convenience stores, and her mother, the co-owner of two successful china shops in Southport and the Lake District before she died of cancer while Beckie was still young.

"My sister, Sam, and I grew up thinking it was actually quite normal to start your own business," says Beckie. "My dad was a sea captain in the Merchant Navy.

"He was away for half the year and that probably added to my belief system that you just got on with it. I always thought I would end up in a profession, but actually my path was probably set."

Urban

In 1990, Beckie returned to the UK. Her degree in urban studies from Sheffield Polytechnic and knowledge of Italian got her a shoe-in at Manchester city council's planning department promoting a revolutionary new technology - the Internet.

"I was obsessed by e-mail when nobody knew what it was! After that, I got a job with the policy unit working with Howard Bernstein, then there was the bomb and that sort of rallied the spirits that we could do things that could change the city.

"That idea of being entrepreneurial - of making decisions and just doing things - was handed down to me by the council."

It was during her time with the council that Beckie met her husband, Chris Joyce. She was sent to meet the former drummer with Simply Red in place of her boss. It was love at first sight: "We had one of those really bizarre moments in this office!"

Then a record producer, the Manchester lad changed Beckie's outlook. "Chris opened my eyes to another way of working. I realised you didn't have to go to work at 8am and come back at eight o'clock at night."

Developed

The couple, and a number of friends, developed a building on Little Peter Street for commercial and residential use.

They soon realised that the bomb had destroyed the only outlet in the city for fresh food, so Beckie and Chris commissioned some market research through Manchester University and began looking for sites for a deli. Their first shop opened on Tib Street in the city's up-and-coming Northern Quarter in 1999.

"It was unheard of to have not come from within the industry - either you were a chef or you'd been in the wine trade for years. I'd always been a good cook; I used to have nights in with my friends when I was about 14 and the fact that none of them would eat anything other than baked beans and pizza didn't stop me doing rack of lamb or other precocious things!

"All the people in the trade said, `Be a restaurant, be a wine merchant or do sandwich take away, but don't put all those together. But if you don't know the rules, you don't know you've broken them."

The deli, Love Saves the Day, named after a graffiti slogan spotted on a wall in New York, soon earned an enviable reputation for its fresh produce, local delicacies and humble décor - the sterling board shelving and bare-brick walls helped to keep the budget down.

Preserve

But these features have become part of the café's recognisable "colour" and Beckie has been keen to preserve them in the recent £300,000 move to bigger premises on Oldham Street. "We wanted to bring elements over so that people could walk in here and recognise it as LStD."

The uniqueness of her brand is something Beckie has thought long and hard about; both she and Chris have been vocal about Manchester's increasingly bland café culture. "The issue of independence is not Manchester or UK specific - we go on holiday and expect to see lovely little shops, but increasingly we're seeing another Zara or Starbucks.

"Big corporates do raise the game and push the standards up, but independence needs to be valued because we want cities that have a point of difference, otherwise what is the point of coming to Manchester?"

Independence hasn't always been easy for Beckie either - until 18 months ago, she was still on the service rota and was in early to sweep floors and clean toilets.

"There have been times in the past when, financially, things have been a nightmare and if we'd had the luxury to get out, we would have. Big corporations can close outlets that don't achieve within 18 months, but when it's your own money it forces you to get it right."

Luckily, Beckie has kept her head. LStD has a second successful outlet on Deansgate, run by sister Sam, and employs 25 staff and an executive board.


Expansion

Turnover has quadrupled since 1999 and the move has caused a 30 per cent jump in sales. The next step, though, poses more of a moral dilemma - expansion.

"We do want to make it bigger and the challenge has been how to do it in a way that fits with our ethics. We're going to franchise because being a manager is not enough in this business - your margins are too low, your staff bill is too high and fresh produce means waste.

"We have two more outlets already planned in Manchester and our franchisees are raring to go."

It could have been so different. "If someone else had opened a deli and done it well, we might not have done it," says Beckie, who was expecting her son, Oscar, when LStD first opened its doors.

"But this job is really like having your cake and eating it. I mean, it's hard and the hours are long and the margins are horribly tight. But you get to try all these great wines and all this great food every night - it's a lovely occupational hazard!"


Quote:
Key to the future

Ben Rooth
THEY are the key workers who don't yet own the key to the door. But both Duncan Dampier and Donna McManus believe that a new city centre development could be the answer to their prayers.

Like many young people, they had become resigned to a life in rented accommodation after watching the price of property spiral ever upwards over the past few years, pricing them completely out of the market.

But a new development in Manchester's Northern Quarter has firmly placed homeownership in one of the city's up and coming areas within their grasp.

When the 90 new apartments in fashion designer Wayne Hemingway's Birchin development, which range in price from £79,950 for a studio to £132,950 for a two-bedroom flat, went on sale at 6am last Thursday, they were among the first through the door. A total of 22 flats in the Birchin have been sold so far.

"We have lived in cheap, rented accommodation in SportCity for the past two years and saved money wherever possible to get our deposit together," explains Duncan, 25, who works for Action For The Unemployed.

"When we arrived at the show apartment at 7am, we were thinking about buying a single-bedroom flat for £87,000 but, having seen the space that you get, we are thinking about buying something bigger.

"And it looks as though we will be able to afford something. We are going to make our decision over the next few days."


Central

Donna, 23, who works for Lex Vehicle Leasing, added: "We have looked at a lot of property in SportsCity and the green quarter but this is far more central. That's what we've been holding out for.

"The prices are reasonable and I also think that your money goes quite a long way here, by modern standards. Another draw is this part of the city - it has a good feel to it."

The government is promising a revolution in home ownership. Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott, recently threw down the gauntlet to building firms by asking them to come up with the £60,000 home.

As recently highlighted in the M.E.N., a Welsh building firm is about to complete its first housing estate of £55,000 homes in Rugby.

In the last week, Chancellor Gordon Brown has unveiled proposals for "shared equity" schemes to assist 100,000 first-time buyers onto the property market. This means couples may have to raise only as little as half the cost of their home - while the government funds the other half.

Scheme

Caroline Barnes was the first person to arrive at the Wayne Hemingway scheme, so keen was she to secure a two-bedroom second floor flat for £132,950. She believes that the Chancellor's new initiative will stabilise the housing market amid fears that we are heading for a recession.

"At the moment, I don't think that anyone knows what will happen with the housing market, but I think that these new initiatives will help stabilise things," said Miss Barnes, who has been renting in Salford Quays.

"If I hadn't been able to get my foot on the property ladder today, I would have looked into this shared equity scheme.

"I think that it would greatly assist lower income aspiring professionals like me to buy somewhere in high value areas. But I couldn't be more delighted to have bought this property. The Northern Quarter keeps getting compared to New York's Lower East side - I don't think the prices will tumble." And this is a view echoed, perhaps predictably, by Hemingway.

Key

When he first started the development, it was intended to ensure that each of the apartments was sold to key workers, people already living in the northern quarter, and to first-time buyers - in that order. And he hopes to keep property investors and speculators at bay.

"When I embarked on this project, I wanted to make a political statement," says Wayne, who founded 1980s fashion label Red Or Dead with his wife, Gerardine.

"They are intended to promote city centre living and encourage local people to buy locally.

"These flats are somewhere between 25 to 40 per cent lower in cost than other comparable developments in this city, and we've done this through not buying designer fixtures and fittings but making our own.

"This is a part of the city which I love and it was where we opened our first shop in the early 1980s. When I go jogging in the city now, either late at night or early in the morning, one of the things I notice is that there are few lights on in many of the residential developments.

"Many of them have been bought by property speculators and are left empty as they accumulate in value. In my opinion, that can't be healthy for communities.

"My abiding wish is that this development will help the continuing regeneration of this part of the city by allowing the people who really want to live here to get a foothold on the property ladder."
SleepyOne no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2005, 02:03 AM   #36
Northbeach
A roussos is for life.
 
Northbeach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Manchester
Posts: 1,175
Likes (Received): 1

Was around this neck of the woods last night with a couple of old friends.
Pretty much blown away by the rate of development around here.
There were bars open we never knew existed (and most probably didn't up until late last year).
Indie's at that - has the council dropped rental charges in this area to actively encourage such businesses?
The small scale new york villages/soho descriptions are beginning to sound less hollow.
Northbeach no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2005, 02:41 AM   #37
dgnr8
Mmm, Danone
 
dgnr8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 1,792
Likes (Received): 10

The Icon 25 effort will be a welcome addition I reckon. Fits in with the current new build but is sympathetic to the older lowrise of the area. And like Northy says, the indies definitely give it a nice urban Manc feel, our very own Soho type nonsense. All we need now is dodgy kebab shops and my mother opening a burlesque house.
dgnr8 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2005, 02:43 AM   #38
Northbeach
A roussos is for life.
 
Northbeach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Manchester
Posts: 1,175
Likes (Received): 1

She already has Wiggles.
I owe you.
Northbeach no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2005, 02:48 AM   #39
dgnr8
Mmm, Danone
 
dgnr8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 1,792
Likes (Received): 10

Dad!!!!
dgnr8 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2005, 07:05 PM   #40
caw123
Hit the north!
 
caw123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 4,678
Likes (Received): 0



Down Church Street today.
__________________
Bespoke Upper Torso Coverage Solutions

"Manchester is located in the center of Lancashire plain in northwestern England like a big circle theatre."
caw123 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu