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Old June 8th, 2005, 10:17 AM   #21
Nouvellecosse
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I think the Montreal Metro could use a bit of freshening. It was ground breaking when it first opened and though it is still attractive, it doesn't look as good as systems like Lisbon's or Helsinki's which are my favorites. I doubt any money will be spent on this in the foreseeable future though. All the available resources will likely be devoted to the expansion efforts.
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Old August 9th, 2005, 05:38 AM   #22
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Montreal beefs up security on metro
Last Updated Mon, 08 Aug 2005 16:40:34 EDT
CBC News

Montreal plans to boost security in its metro system by installing 1,200 more surveillance cameras.

Montreal Transit Corporation officials said the cameras are part of a $700-million project to renovate the rail transit system, which will soon mark its 40th anniversary.

The officials also said they're taking part in federal consultations to improve security on public transit systems.

Last Friday, federal Transport Minister Jean Lapierre announced plans for security upgrades that included barring some people from flying on commercial flights.

Lapierre said he planned to meet with key players from the country's ground transportation systems to discuss how to make them safer.

The drive to boost security was spurred by the attacks on London's transit system in July, as well as the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States .

Montreal transit officials said they would also like to see cameras installed on 336 new subway cars.

The city's metro system is one of the oldest in Canada, second only to Toronto's.

It was built for the world's fair Expo 67 and first opened in 1966.
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Old August 24th, 2005, 06:24 PM   #23
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Greater Montreal Transit system.

1) Autobus
Montreal area is divise by 3 major bus Network, STM (Island of Montreal/ covering a population of 1 800 000) RTL (Boucherville/Longueuil/ Brossard, covering a population of 390 000) and STL (Laval, covering 375 000). Other suburbs are cover by minor transport agency and trains line.


RTL autobus Express Montreal Downtown to Brossard


Stm Nova Bus, most popular model for STM/RTL and STL

2) Trains de banlieue
Montreal '' Trains de banlieue'' suburban trains covers large area around Montreal. (West/ North and South)



3) Metro:

Built during 60's for the '' Exposition Universelle de Montréal'' in 1967.
Facts:
-On pneumatics
-Trains built by Bombardier in 60's (began in 1962) and 70's (two similar models)
-All station entrances in Montreal are completely enclosed
-Art in each stations
- Four lines, 67 stations
- 61 kilometers of tunnel







Last edited by PhilippeMtl; August 24th, 2005 at 11:17 PM.
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Old August 24th, 2005, 09:47 PM   #24
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The Montréal system is indeed one of the best in North America. Keeping with its inherent European essence, Montréal, much like European cities, invests enormous resources into its public transportation, thus making it the North American city with the highest per capita ridership and the lowest car ownership.

Metropolitan area:



Communter-rail system:

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Old August 24th, 2005, 11:38 PM   #25
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I love the montreal system. My only knock is the poor bus/subway station integration.
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Old August 24th, 2005, 11:59 PM   #26
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I can't believe that the ATM goes all the way to Rigaud (2 times a day)! It's almost the Ontario border!
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Old August 25th, 2005, 02:54 AM   #27
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It would be good if the subway went more into Longueil. there should be a line out to the airport
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Old August 25th, 2005, 08:58 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haber
It would be good if the subway went more into Longueil. there should be a line out to the airport
There are plans to expand the yellow line further into the South Shore. Montreal, Pierre Elliott Trudeau International will be directly linked to the Commuter Rail red line; that's due for 2008-2009.
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Old August 25th, 2005, 09:47 PM   #29
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Thats great to have a subway link to the airport. I hope Toronto would do the same.
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Old August 25th, 2005, 09:52 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bertez
Thats great to have a subway link to the airport. I hope Toronto would do the same.
It won't be the Métro (subway), but rather the Train banlieue (Commuter Rail). Effectively it will be the same... perhaps lower frequency.
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Old September 6th, 2005, 04:48 PM   #31
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Post pic's of ur city's metro

Here's some from montreal

Built during 60's for the '' Exposition Universelle de Montréal'' in 1967.
Facts:
-On pneumatics
-Trains built by Bombardier in 60's (began in 1962) and 70's (two similar models)
-All station entrances in Montreal are completely enclosed
-entirely underground
-Art in each stations
-69 km's of tunnel
-Four lines, 67 stations












[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/placesthenri/vaults2.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/acadie/platform.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/acadie/mural3.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/acadie/bench.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/acadie/mezzanine-below.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/acadie/mezzanine-above.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/acadie/eastkiosk.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/angrignon/archmain.html[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/angrignon/archmain.html[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/georgesvanier/birdseye.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/georgesvanier/tree.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/lasalle/platform-mezzanine.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/lasalle/walls3.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/lasalle/walls4.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/lasalle/kiosk.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/lionelgroulx/int-panorama.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/monk/sculptures-back.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/monk/bridge.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/placesthenri/vaults3.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/placesthenri/cartier.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/placesthenri/colours.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/champdemars/ferron-panorama.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/decastelnau/volume1.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/delasavane/platform.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/delasavane/mezzanine2.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/ducollege/floor.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/ducollege/favretti-south.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/ducollege/mezzanine.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/edouardmontpetit/platform.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/fabre/platform.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/jolicoeur/platform.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/namur/systeme2.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/outremont/lightshaft.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/outremont/mezzanine.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/prefontaine/mezzanine2.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/stmichel/transept1.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/stmichel/transept2.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/vendome/stainedglass.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/vendome/volume.jpg[/IMG]

Last edited by D_block; September 6th, 2005 at 05:38 PM.
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Old September 6th, 2005, 04:49 PM   #32
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Here's some more from montreal,canada









[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/berri/greenvolume.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/berri/skylight.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/cadillac/stairs.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/cotedesneiges/platform.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/cotestecatherine/frieze.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/cremazie/volume.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/henribourassa/reveil.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/honorebeaugrand/overlook.jpg[/IMG]



[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/honorebeaugrand/mousseau1.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/honorebeaugrand/platform.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/lucienlallier/int-panorama.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/montroyal/archmain.html[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/pieix/mezzanine.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/pieix/control.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/pieix/citius1.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/plamondon/northwall.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/rosemont/bridge.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/sherbrooke/platform2.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/snowdon/stmichel.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/snowdon/hbourassa.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/snowdon/cvertu-undamaged.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/verdun/mezzanine-overview.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/verdun/platform-overview.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/verdun/bridge.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/green/verdun/skylight.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/villamaria/overlook.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/villamaria/platform.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/orange/villamaria/benches.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/blue/diberville/pelican.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://www.metrodemont*********/yellow/jeandrapeau/platform.jpg[/IMG]




i have lot more,if u wana see let me knw
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Old September 11th, 2005, 03:52 AM   #33
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A system in need of major surgery: Our metro stations and trains urgently require an injection of $2.6 billion.
The green-line cars, in particular, are so old they need to be replaced before breakdowns and maintenance costs soar
10 September 2005
Montreal Gazette

When Montreal's rubber-tire metro made its debut in 1966, it was fast, quiet - and a sophisticated addition to a city on the cusp of staging the world's fair.

OK, so it was sweltering at first inside the cars and a few people fainted because of an ill-conceived ventilation system.

But it still won over many Montrealers like Robert Humphreys, whose first impression when he zipped along in the metro was: "Wow."

"We were all just enthralled with it at the time," said Humphreys, 64, now semi-retired. "So even if there were little mistakes, you never noticed them. You were more forgiving."

Next year, the metro turns 40. It won't be "the new 30." Signs of creeping age can be seen - and even felt, in the case of travelling on Line 1, the green line, when your body sometimes shakes uncontrollably as the train heads east from Lionel Groulx. (The vibrations are the result of tires wearing out and an old suspension on the green-line cars.)

Maintenance costs are rising and the entire metro fleet is old - the MR-63 cars on the green line are almost 40 years old.

In an industry where subway cars start being replaced after 30 years, the average age of the MTC's fleet is about 32 years - more than double that of the Toronto Transit Commission's fleet, with an average age of about 14.

Even if Quebec gives the go-ahead immediately to replace the MR-63s, with tenders and test runs, the last of them probably wouldn't be withdrawn from service until about 2013 - at the age of 47, said Carl Desrosiers, executive director of the MTC's metro network. And spare parts will be impossible to find by then, he said.

While safety won't be a problem because of the metro's fail-safe system, Desrosiers said the maintenance costs will explode and there is a risk the number of breakdowns will increase.

"What we say is if we move right away, there won't be a crisis," he said. "It will go well. But if we stretch it out, then we'll have a reliability problem."

Some key upgrades of the metro's aging infrastructure are already under way. In fact, the 66-kilometre network is undergoing the mother of all facelifts and some extensive surgery. A new control centre, 43 new escalators - more reliable ones, the MTC promises - and a new public-address system with clearer sound are part of the $311-million Phase 1 renovations, scheduled to end next year.

If the proposed second and third phases receive funding, the metro will get a new signalling system, countless kilometres of new fibre-optic cables and numerous other upgrades.

"I would say to you we're rebuilding (the metro)," said Desrosiers, who is scheduled to speak about transit technology at the MetroRail 2005 international transit conference in Miami, Dec. 5 to 7. "It's a bit like an old car where you start to change a part - you have to change almost all of them."

The hefty price tag for all the work under way and on the MTC's metro wish list is almost $2.6 billion over 10 years, including about $1.1 billion for 336 new metro cars.

The renovations are important, but the cars are vital, said Marvin Rotrand, vice-chairperson of the MTC's board of directors. "You can't have a wonderful system and non-functioning rolling stock."

For now, at least, the MTC wants to replace the oldest cars in its fleet, the 336 MR-63 cars, which operate on the green line and are the same age as the metro. The matter is being studied by the Quebec government.

"Without knowing anything about it, except for my general experience, they're pushing the envelope on age," said David Gunn, a well-known veteran of the transit industry who has run subway systems in New York, Toronto, Washington and Philadelphia.

Now president of Amtrak, Gunn said the 30-year life of subway cars can be extended through diligent maintenance and by heavily overhauling them at a key point. He noted, for instance, that London's Underground has cars that are over 50 years old on the Circle and District lines that work pretty well. Still, Gunn said, in a heavily travelled system like Montreal or Toronto, "by the time a car has reached 35, 40 years, they are getting very tired."

"There is a point that it becomes extremely expensive, and it's difficult to keep them operating."

Gunn suggests the MTC get an option to replace its MR-73 cars that run on the orange, blue and yellow lines. Built by Bombardier, the 423 MR-73 cars are 28 to 30 years old, making them slightly younger than the TTC's oldest subway cars.

Desrosiers said the MTC will certainly study the idea.

"It would make sense to say we'll raise an option within five years to have the same cars," he said, noting it costs about $50 million to start up a production.

So where will all the money come from?

Last year, the MTC and the Quebec Department of Transport undertook a joint study to see what would be the best way to finance the new cars, said Claude Dauphin, chairperson of the MTC's board. They looked at different options, including leasing cars, he said.

"They are aware of the urgency, and I'm convinced that they will go to the Treasury Board soon with that."

Under the recent federal-provincial gasoline tax revenue agreement, Montreal is slated to receive $657 million in infrastructure money, of which $367 million over five years would go to public transit.

"It won't solve everything, but at least it's amounts of money that we didn't have before," Dauphin said.

He suggests that more federal money, in addition to provincial funding, will be needed for Phase 2 and 3 of the metro renovation program, called Reno-Systemes. Ottawa invested in Montreal's metro for the first time during Phase 1, covering about 30 per cent of the costs, with Quebec picking up 45 per cent and the MTC and Metropolitan Transit Agency 12.5 per cent each.

For Phase 2, the MTC's Dauphin said he believes it is a matter of weeks or months before Quebec issues the final authorization.

Dauphin does not foresee commuters having to help offset the infrastructure investments through a fare hike.

"Users did their share in my opinion in the past four years," he said. "We had a lot of fare increases, but now they need a break."

Murtaza Haider, an assistant professor in McGill University's engineering faculty, questions why the provincial government decided to "throw away" $800 million on the metro extension to Laval, knowing the scale of investment that was needed to upgrade the existing system. "Why didn't they spend money on this rather than building an extension that almost no one on the island of Montreal will use?"

- - -

Last December, the metro system shut down temporarily when the internal telephone system, which is the same age as the metro, broke down for 80 minutes. Fortunately, they had spare parts from eastern Europe, said Desrosiers, because there aren't any such systems in North America anymore. (The telephone system is being replaced as part of the Phase 1 renovations.)

In June, a large section of the metro network was shut down for most of the workday after a cable under a platform caught fire at the Sherbrooke metro station and spread to other cables.

- - -

Robert Bergeron contends that 20 years ago metro riders never gave a thought to a system malfunction and were surprised when it happened. "Today, we expect a breakdown," said Bergeron, leader of the Projet Montreal municipal party. "See how it has changed in the minds of users?"

Desrosiers said the metro had an excellent year in 2004 when the number of rolling stock breakdowns dropped from 2003. However, so far this year, the rolling stock has broken down more than in 2004 for the corresponding period.

More malfunctions occur with the green-line cars. With their original motors from 1966, MR-63 cars travel about 170,000 kilometres between breakdowns, which Desrosiers said meets international standards. "We're still at that level, except that it's going down 10,000 kilometres a year."

By comparison, the younger MR-73 cars go more than double the distance of green-line cars - 350,000 kilometres - between breakdowns. The MTC's maintenance costs for rolling stock have risen from $28.6 million in 2000 to $35.3 million in 2004.

In Toronto, Rick Cornacchia, the deputy general manager, subway operations at the TTC, says their new subway cars are three times more reliable than their older cars. "That's the kind of benefit you really do get for the customers," he said.

Ridership on public transit in Montreal remains high. In fact, the public transit lobby group Canadian Urban Transit Association says it believes Montreal has the highest ridership per capita in North America. About 367,000 people here use the bus and metro system daily, according to a recent survey by the Metropolitan Transit Agency.

"It's still one of the world's good metro systems - reliable and safe," Dauphin insisted.

For coverage and service, Haider calls it one of the world's best systems. "It works very well. It's the envy of most North American operators, with the exception of Toronto, which is very exceptional," he said.

The Railway Technology Strategy Centre at Imperial College in London does benchmarking for 23 subway systems in the world, including the MTC and those in New York, London, Paris and Toronto.

The centre examines such elements as service, efficiency and covering costs, said Richard Anderson, the managing associate.

According to 2003 data, he said, the MTC metro cars, largely because they are well maintained, are among the most reliable of the systems the centre looks at in Europe and North America.

Desrosiers calls the MR-73 cars more reliable than most trains in North America and says they have kept the workhorse MR-63s in great shape through meticulous maintenance.

"Normally, a 39-year-old car is decrepit," he said.

Timeline: in 1966, Fanfare and a 20-Cent Ride

Oct. 14, 1966 : The Montreal metro is born. It consists of Line 1 - Atwater to Frontenac (the Beaudry and Frontenac stations opened two months later) - and Line 2, Henri Bourassa to Place d'Armes.

The fare is 20 cents.

February 1967: The Square Victoria and Bonaventure stations open.

Line 4 is launched from Berri de Montigny to Longueuil.

April 1967: The Ile Ste. Helene station opens in the nick of time on April 28 - the same day Expo '67 kicks off.

March 3, 1971: The metro runs all night for the first time during the so-called storm of the century.

(Seventeen people died in the blizzard.)

Dec. 9, 1971: Train driver dies when his train slams into a stationary one and catches fire at a switching area north of the Henri Bourassa station. The fire destroys 27 cars and a metro garage, causing $7 million in damage.

Jan. 23, 1974: About 1,200 metro riders escape a smoke-filled tunnel between the Laurier and Rosemont stations after a series of tire blowouts started a fire. The blaze destroys the nine-car train. No one is injured.

The metro subsequently underwent a series of safety improvements after an inquiry recommended nearly $70 million worth of changes. They included installing emergency power generators, additional fire extinguishers and improving communications.

Reflecting on those changes, former MUCTC board member Abe Limonchik told The Gazette in 1987: "It was a fortune, but the overhaul was done and Montreal now has one of the safest subways in the world."

1976: Line 1, the green line, is extended to Honore Beaugrand. An automatic train control system is launched on the line later that year. Among other things, the computerized system ensures adequate space between two trains on the network. The new fail-safe system was introduced mainly because of the 1971 accident. Carl Desrosiers, head of the MTC's metro network, said the system, which was avant-garde at the time, has proved to be extremely safe and reliable.

September 1978: The green line is extended to Angrignon.

April 1980: Line 2, the orange line, now extends to Place St. Henri.

September 1981: The orange line reaches the Snowdon station.

1982: The orange line is extended to Cote Ste. Catherine and then the Plamondon station.

January 1984 : The Du College station opens on the orange line.

1986: In June, Line 5, the blue line, is launched from De Castelneau to St. Michel. In October, the orange line is extended to one of its current endpoints - Cote Vertu station.

June 1987: The blue line extends to Parc.

January 1988: The blue line's Snowdon station opens.

June 2002: The Montreal Transit Corp. introduces three prototypes of reconfigured metro cars and seeks the public's feedback, as part of its bid to cope with increased ridership.

Dec. 2004: The internal telephone system, which is the same age as the metro, breaks down for 80 minutes, forcing the metro system to temporarily shut down.

June 20, 2005: Half the metro system is out of service for most of the workday when a cable under a platform catches fire at the Sherbrooke metro station and spreads to other cables.

July 2007: The three metro stations in Laval are expected to open.
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Old September 13th, 2005, 06:43 AM   #34
hkskyline
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I've always thought the Metro was very well maintained. There wasn't rust on the ceilings; the stations are clean and spacious.

System 'among the worst' for aged
But improvements are coming for elderly and handicapped

BRENDA BRANSWELL
12 September 2005
Montreal Gazette

One thought haunts Grace Cawley every time she leaves her Longueuil home to travel to work on the metro.

"Is the escalator going to be working? - that's my fear," said Cawley, 64, who has a form of muscular dystrophy.

"And often it isn't."

For Cawley, negotiating a long flight of stairs - up or down - is an arduous process. Her bad knee hurts more going downstairs. Walking up them in the metro, which Cawley has also had to do, poses other problems. "The only thing I can do is rest my muscles for a bit and then go again - it's awful," said Cawley, an X-ray technician.

Cawley finds older people - and she doesn't consider herself one of them yet - are quite fearful about taking the metro. "I don't hear them talking about crime ... it's the physical set-up and the stairs and escalators that don't work."

With an aging population and the first of the baby boomers about to turn 60, concerns about the metro's accessibility are likely to face even more scrutiny in the coming years.

The physical layout also poses headaches for parents with strollers when escalators are out of service. For many disabled people, especially those confined to wheelchairs, the metro is still an impenetrable fortress. Unlike Toronto, where nearly one-third of the subway stations are wheelchair accessible, none of Montreal's 65 stations are so equipped.

Claude Dauphin, the chairperson of the Montreal Transit Corp.'s board, calls the city a pioneer with its wheelchair accessible buses.

When it comes to the metro, however, MTC officials readily acknowledge they lag behind. "We're among the worst," conceded Carl Desrosiers, executive director of the metro network at MTC.

Desrosiers noted that Montreal's youngest metro stations were conceived in the late 1970s and early '80s. At that time, society wasn't as concerned about the issue, he said.

Some improvements are on the horizon. The three new stations in Laval expected to open in July 2007 will be wheelchair accessible.

And Phase 2 of the MTC's $1.5-billion renovation program called Reno-Systemes proposes making six metro stations accessible. (Phase 1, which includes building a new control room, is underway. Phase 2 is waiting for the go-ahead from the Quebec government.)

A working committee that includes representatives for the disabled, the MTC and the Quebec Department of Transport suggested the stations, Dauphin said. They are: Henri Bourassa, Berri-UQAM, Bonaventure, Cote Vertu, Longueuil and Lionel Groulx.

With two superhospitals planned for Montreal, Dauphin suggested Vendome and Champs de Mars should be added to the list.

"It won't solve the problem ... it's the start," says Michael Magnaer, with the Office des personnes handicapes du Quebec. The government agency has been pushing for the metro to be accessible to the disabled for about 20 years now - and not just because it's an amazing transportation system, Magnaer said.

It's also to give them access to the underground city, he said. "From the point of view of a disabled person, it's an ideal place.

"There is no snow, it's easy to get around. ... There are lots of boutiques and stores and all."

It isn't simply a matter of installing elevators, Magnaer added. "It's the whole question of evacuation in the event of a fire, a terrorist attack - anything."

In 2007, Montreal is scheduled to host the 11th International Conference on Mobility and Transport for Elderly and Disabled Persons. Magnaer said he thinks having the event here might pressure the provincial government to act on the issue. Obviously, he said, a conference of that scope "won't hurt the cause."

- - -

Last year, Desrosiers wandered around the metro with his eyes blindfolded, clutching a cane. He did so at the invitation of the Regroupement des aveugles et amblyopes du Montreal metropolitain. The advocacy group has invited MTC officials into the metro to sensitize them to the difficulties faced by visually-impaired riders. Desrosiers experienced first-hand a trouble spot in the Berri-UQAM station caused by echoing sound where buskers played music.

"For a blind person, when there is an echo, they lose their sense of orientation," Desrosiers said. "I tried it and I walked into a wall." (They stopped musicians from playing there, he added.)

Last winter, the group submitted a report to the MTC that evaluated the metro's initial 26 stations. While it has not been made public, Yvon Provencher, a spokesperson for the group, said the major problems involve lighting, signage and inadequate visual markings on stairs and escalators to help orient the visually impaired.

"Henri Bourassa is a problem; it's too dark," Provencher said. Ditto for the Mont Royal station near the turnstiles.

He holds up the Sherbrooke station as a model for its lighting. "Everywhere in the station it's very, very well lit."

The group also wants reflective, textured yellow tiles placed near the edge of train platforms as a warning for visually impaired people.

The MTC, which has approached Quebec for financing, plans to install the tiles in stations as part of Phase 2 of its renovation program, Desrosiers said.

- - -

At the entrance to the McGill metro station, Gaelle Petit is the picture of efficiency. She quickly hoists a stroller over the turnstiles, then coaxes her 21/2-year-old daughter, Mia - resplendent in a purple poncho, jeans and a pink hair-band - into the station.

Mia can walk down the stairs now. But things haven't always been as easy. In the past when an escalator was out of service, Petit had to carry her in the stroller by positioning it on her hip as she walked down the stairs.

"It's quite heavy. It's especially not easy for the back," said Petit, 28.

- - -

At 85, Margaret Dugal still uses the metro every day and likes the system. Of late, when she goes to the Snowdon station, she has had to walk down more than 115 stairs because a new escalator is being installed.

"I don't enjoy it. Very often I have to wait and rest on each landing because I have a cane," said Dugal, who has had a hip and knee replacement.

"For us, it's a major preoccupation," Desrosiers said. "We're not very satisfied with our escalators now. We want them to be more reliable. That's why we're investing."

Phase 1 of the huge renovation program has included the installation of 43 new escalators. Desrosiers said they will be much more dependable than the ones they are replacing. "They are old escalators and we had a series that had a bad design, which were less reliable than the other ones."

He acknowledged they've run into problems with the brand-new escalators - among them the one at Guy-Concordia that Cawley noticed has already been out of service during her daily commute.

As with new trains, Desrosiers said, it's normal to have to iron out bugs with new escalators. "We had several problems. They are almost all solved now, and it will give us an escalator that is quite a bit more reliable."

In Boston, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority has a telephone service that provides people who ride the T with updates on the status of elevators and escalators in subway stations.

With his heart problem, Moe Spanier would certainly like a heads-up about non-functioning escalators before he heads to a metro station.

Spanier, 73, had to walk up the stairs at the Cote Ste. Catherine station a few months ago and got to the top huffing and puffing.

"Why don't they put a sign on the bus telling you that the escalator going up is not working?" he asked.

For her part, Cawley plans to keep taking the metro as long as she can. The first time she called the MTC to complain about escalators not working, Cawley said, they apologized and were "very nice and gracious."

"They actually phoned me about once a year for the next three or four years to see if I thought things had improved much."

And have they?

"Not really," Cawley said with a laugh.
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Old November 25th, 2005, 06:47 AM   #35
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Details of Montreal subway on computer of man questioned in Madrid bombings
23 November 2005
The Canadian Press

MADRID, Spain (AP) - Police found detailed data on Spanish trains, a map of the London Underground and information on Montreal's subway system on the personal computer of a Moroccan questioned in the Madrid terror bombings, a Spanish newspaper has reported.

Abdelhak Chergui, a 32-year-old Moroccan who studies telecommunications in Spain, was arrested in May along with his brother, Abdelkhalak

He was questioned by Judge Juan del Olmo, the magistrate leading the investigation of the March 11, 2004, bombings that killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,500 people.

At the time, police said the two were suspected of helping to finance the attacks and providing weapons to people accused of carrying them out.

However, Del Olmo released them for lack of evidence after ordering them to surrender their passports.

Police kept investigating Abdelhak Chergui, and in an examination of his personal computer found detailed information on the Madrid, London and Montreal systems, El Pais reported Monday. It quoted a police report submitted to the judge in September.

Police declined to comment on the newspaper report.

El Pais did not say if Spanish police suspected Chergui of any role in the deadly London terror attacks of July or if Spanish authorities planned to bring him in for more questioning.

The Madrid attacks were claimed by militants who said they acted on al-Qaida's behalf to avenge the presence of Spanish troops in Iraq under then-prime minister Jose Maria Aznar, a conservative.

Socialists led by Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero won a general election held three days after the bombings. Zapatero withdrew the troops shortly after taking power.

A total of 26 people are in jail in connection with the Madrid bombings, but around 80 more who were questioned and released are still considered suspects.
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Old November 26th, 2005, 01:30 AM   #36
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Rubber tires require more maintenance than steel wheels, as they wear out faster.

Rubber tires eliminate the rumbling vibrations that shake adjacent buildings. In Toronto, you can hear the subway rumble more than a block away but in Montreal, you hardly feel it even if you are right on top of the line -- this is important in cities with lots of old stone buildings that were not built to withstand constant vibration. There is also less disturbance when the line runs through residential neighbourhoods.
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Old November 26th, 2005, 03:49 AM   #37
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The Montreal Metro is dated and maintenance is lacking. Needs a facelift.
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Old December 14th, 2005, 04:30 AM   #38
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MTC hikes cost of passes, turns to anti-fraud system
13 December 2005
Montreal Gazette

The Montreal Transit Corp. is raising transit fares in January - the ninth hike in as many years - and installing electronic fare boxes to catch riders who shortchange the system.

The adult monthly pass goes from $61 to $63; the reduced monthly pass will cost $33.75, up from $32.50.

Even with fare increases, Montreal's transit system is still a bargain, Marvin Rotrand, vice-chairperson of the public transit board, said yesterday.

"We're among the most affordable transit commissions in North America," he said yesterday at a news conference to unveil the agency's $864.4-million budget for 2006.

The budget includes $5.6 million for service upgrades, including 12,000 hours of additional bus services in Pointe aux Trembles and St. Laurent.

But transit officials also forecast a budget shortfall next year of $32 million. Board chairperson Claude Dauphin blamed it on rising energy costs, employee wage and benefit increases, and expanded services for adapted-transit users.

But a public transit advocate says the excuses are beginning to wear thin.

"We're very disappointed," said Normand Parisien of the Transport 2000 lobby group.

"With the federal government giving a share of gas taxes to cities for public transit, we were expecting a better deal for commuters."

The steady rise in fares - the cost of a monthly pass has jumped 40 per cent since 1997 - is tough on low-income families in Montreal, Parisien noted.

Hotel chambermaid Sara Berrios says it's hard enough to pay for a monthly pass without seeing the price go up every year.

"In itself, $2 isn't that much money," said Berrios, who commutes downtown every day from east-end St. Michel. "But when you raise the fare by $2 every year, it gets expensive.

"It's hard when everything, including groceries, keeps going up in price."

Transit authorities say their hands are tied: they depend on commuters for 45 per cent of their budget.

As it is, the fare hikes next year will offset $10.6 million in higher diesel and natural gas costs, but that still leaves the transit company $22 million short for 2006, Dauphin said.

The city of Montreal, despite its own budget problems, has promised to jack up its contribution by $10 million next year, for a total of $278 million.

But the provincial government has made no such promise.

"A couple of years ago, Quebec told us our fares were too low, and if we increased the fares they would help us," Dauphin noted. "We're still waiting for that new financial framework."

Dauphin said he hopes Quebec comes up with a bailout package and new funding sources in its budget in February 2006.

In the meanwhile, the transit agency is going after commuters who cheat the system by tossing insufficient change into fare boxes or using the wrong ticket.

The agency is to install new electronic fare boxes in all 1,600 buses by the end of 2006.

Automatic readers will be added to the boxes when a smart-card fare system is introduced, possibly by 2008.

The anti-fraud system will pay for itself within seven years, transit authorities say, and eventually bring in $20 million in additional annual revenue.

Inspectors will be hired to make spot checks - red lights and beeping sounds on the fare boxes signal insufficient payment - and hand out tickets for infractions.

But the system will rely as much on peer pressure as getting tough with scofflaws.

"If the red light goes on, all the other passengers see it," transit board member Dominic Perri said. "You might do it once or twice, but it would take a very special kind of person to cheat the system on a regular basis."

Monthly Pass Less Expensive Here

City One time (cash) Individual ticket Monthly pass

Toronto $2.50 $2.00 $98.75
Montreal $2.50 $1.92 $63.00
Ottawa $3.00 $1.90 $71.25
Vancouver $2.25 $1.80 $69.00
New York* $2.32 $1.86 $88.16

* U.S. prices converted to Canadian funds, $1 U.S. equals $1.16 Canadian, as of Dec. 8, 2005.

Source: Montreal Transit Corp., Toronto Transit Commission, OC Transpo, Vancouver Transit Authority, Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority

New Transit Prices for 2006

Monthly Pass Regular fare: $63.00
Change from 2005: +$2.00

Reduced fare: $33.75
Change from 2005: +$1.25

Weekly pass Regular fare: $18.50
Change from 2005: +50 cents

Reduced fare: $9.75
Change from 2005: +50 cents

Tickets (6) Regular fare: $11.50
Change from 2005: +25 cents

Reduced fare: $6.00
Change from 2005: +25 cents

Single fare Regular fare: $2.50
Change from 2005: -

Reduced fare: $1.50
Change from 2005: +25 cents

Source: Montreal Transit Corp.
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Old December 14th, 2005, 07:44 AM   #39
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hkskyline, without you, this entire subsection of the forum would be dead.

Thanks!!!

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Old December 14th, 2005, 05:16 PM   #40
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The price of a monthly pass is a steal!
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