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Old October 18th, 2017, 02:54 AM   #901
Mr Downtown
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I find myself wondering why Montreal chose such a small loading gauge when building from scratch in the 1960s? The narrow cars seem quite cramped when compared to other systems of the era. Are there tight turns (can't think of any) or did they think they'd save a lot of money with smaller tunnels?
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Old October 18th, 2017, 03:27 AM   #902
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I do know that the tunnels are steeper than other metro systems. That's why it uses rubber tire vehicles.
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Old October 18th, 2017, 03:24 PM   #903
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Downtown View Post
I find myself wondering why Montreal chose such a small loading gauge when building from scratch in the 1960s? The narrow cars seem quite cramped when compared to other systems of the era. Are there tight turns (can't think of any) or did they think they'd save a lot of money with smaller tunnels?
Montreal's metro uses narrower cars, but longer trains than most systems (9 cars - 152 m long on Green and Orange lines) so the overall capacity is roughly the same compared to systems that use wider rolling stock.

The use of narrower gauge has allowed to put both tracks in only one tunnel, greatly reducing costs.
For example, the last extension to Laval turned out to be around 150 M$/km for 5 km of double tracks, 3 stations, a 3rd platform at Henri-Bourassa, a train garage and firefighting training facility at Montmorency station as well as two bus terminals (Cartier and Montmorency). The same extension using broader rolling stock and two parallel tunnel would have cost at least 200 M$/km.
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Old October 18th, 2017, 03:25 PM   #904
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Anyone know when they plan to announce the winners for REM?
If I remember correctly, it's supposed to be at the end of this month or early November.
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Old October 18th, 2017, 03:33 PM   #905
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAronymous View Post
I do know that the tunnels are steeper than other metro systems. That's why it uses rubber tire vehicles.
Back in 1963, when Montreal's metro techology was chosen, rubber tyred trains were an excellent way to reduce infrastructure costs. It allowed to build steeper tunnels, which made it easier to optimize tunnel alignment and to avoid and go around obstacles (existing underground infrastructure, bad quality soil, etc) versus desired and optimal station location.
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Old October 31st, 2017, 11:37 AM   #906
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Jean Drapeau Metro Station by Matt, on Flickr
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Old November 1st, 2017, 04:09 PM   #907
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gros Matou View Post
If I remember correctly, it's supposed to be at the end of this month or early November.
Deadline for submissions was Oct. 27th. Bid winners should be announced around Nov. 10th.
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Old November 2nd, 2017, 07:15 PM   #908
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By monopolizing Mont Royal tunnel right-of-ways, isn't this "REM" project going to kill off the recently inaugurated Mascouche commuter rail line, thus raising serious discontents in the eastern part of Montréal? Area which, despite its densities, remains poorly served as we speak?

Weren't the long awaited blue line extension towards Galeries d'Anjou or the extension of the orange line towards Bois-Franc addressing more urgent needs, by covering blank spots and creating a new metro/train connection with the Deux-Montagnes line?

St-Anne-de-Bellevue branch doesn't seem to serve much purposes given the fact it almost completely parallels the existent Vaudreuil-Hudson line in a relatively sparsely built area. I'm pretty sure there's room for improvements regarding frequencies and reliability on Montréal commuter rail network. Has there been any costs/benefits study done about that matter?

I might lack some clues on the whole issue, forgive me in advance.
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Old November 3rd, 2017, 06:13 AM   #909
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Originally Posted by BlackArt-ist View Post
By monopolizing Mont Royal tunnel right-of-ways, isn't this "REM" project going to kill off the recently inaugurated Mascouche commuter rail line, thus raising serious discontents in the eastern part of Montréal? Area which, despite its densities, remains poorly served as we speak?
Mascouche's line ridership is low, due to poor level of service (8 trains per day, each way) and poorly integrated fares which make bus service much cheaper and in many ways more convenient (more frequent, more flexible) than the commuter train, especially for people living on the island.

However, the REM project involves the construction of a station identified as Correspondance A40 and located where current Deux-Montagnes and Mascouche line go unter the viaduct of Autoroute 40. There, the tracks for Mascouche line would end and a convenient transfer would be provided between Mascouche line and REM. A 3-track REM platform would allow an empty REM train to be available at the station for commuter train users that want to transfer.

https://www.cdpqinfra.com/sites/defa...ascouche_0.pdf

Yes, this new correspondance makes the journey longer for people taking the train and working downtown near Gare Centrale. However, for the many people working or studying near McGill, Édouard-Montpetit, in Saint-Laurent borough or on the south shore, the extra but convenient transfer will actually makes their journeys faster.

Quote:
Weren't the long awaited blue line extension towards Galeries d'Anjou or the extension of the orange line towards Bois-Franc addressing more urgent needs, by covering blank spots and creating a new metro/train connection with the Deux-Montagnes line?
These are priority projects, especially at municipal level and for transit authorities. However, heavy rail to the south shore and to the airport were also considered a priority and the mandate was given to the CDPQ Infra to provide a solution for the latter. They will certainly get involved in other projects in the future.

Here, large transit projects are mostly financed by the province, with little money input from federal (REM being the exception so far) and municipal governments.
So the provincial government in very auto-centric Quebec City, formed by a majority of deputies and ministers that come from low-density auto-centric regions (due to our archaic electoral system where low-density regions have disproportionately big political power - despite Greater Montreal being home of 50% of the province's population) get to decide what transportation projects get financed and you can guess that a large part of the transportation minister's budget money goes to motorways, especially in regions where the traffic flow does not justify it.

Now my opinion is that we should go ahead and build the much needed blue line to Anjou and Orange line to Bois-Franc as soon as possible and immediately start planning the next line, which could be mayor candidate Valérie Plante's interesting pink line proposal.



Quote:
St-Anne-de-Bellevue branch doesn't seem to serve much purposes given the fact it almost completely parallels the existent Vaudreuil-Hudson line in a relatively sparsely built area. I'm pretty sure there's room for improvements regarding frequencies and reliability on Montréal commuter rail network. Has there been any costs/benefits study done about that matter?
One should not worry about Vaudreuil-Hudson line. Although it is Montreal's 2nd busiest commuter line, at arount 13 round trips per day, the level service is poor compared to proper commuter train lines. We have bus lines that have a higher ridership. Plus trains are often late due to private track owner Canadian Pacific giving priority to their freight trains over passenger trains.

Also, the tracks belonging to a private freight train company makes it very difficult and very expensive to make any slight improvement on the line.

In the end, the REM will provide a service that is more frequent, more reliable, more flexible and much less expensive to operate than commuter trains. The Vaudreuil line has a ~50% return on cost ratio (line revenues divided by line operation expenses), while REM's return will be over 100% because it's designed to generate profit due to its automated operation.

Now, the Vaudreuil line will probably lose a small part of its ridership, but people from Hudson, Vaudreuil, Dorion and people living closer to train stations than REM stations will certainly continue to use the line, especially during rush hour.
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Old November 18th, 2017, 08:08 PM   #910
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Old November 21st, 2017, 03:30 AM   #911
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I have recently visited Montreal for the first time and experiencing the hype of the mayoral elections with their promises on public transport. Now I have read an interesting blog about the 'what could have beens', a Metro map for 2050 based on old and varied promises and commitments by successive groups.



MTL BLog's STM Metro map of the year 2050 original article
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Old November 21st, 2017, 10:00 PM   #912
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It looks nice, colorfull and so on, but... such system would be very uneffective, due to the need of many changes. Too much lines stop before they meet others. The dark blue line never connects with purple, light blue, orange or grey one. I now it's not real, but it wouldnt be a good metro system at all. It would recquire many interchanges.
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Old Today, 02:04 PM   #913
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