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Old February 11th, 2008, 08:14 PM   #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habfanman View Post
What about someday looping Snowdon to connect with a slightly extended Angrignon? (it's OK to dream isn't it?)
It's needed -- either the Green or Blue Line should make it all the way into Lachine's east end.



Quote:
Originally Posted by dwdwone View Post
Is there any news on light rail projects for Montreal?
L'Agence métropolitain de transport -- the authority that plans the Montreal regions public transport -- has now come up with a «tram-train» -- see Page 26 on their tri-annual report at the following hyperlink:
http://www.amt.qc.ca/corpo/documents...T_2008_PTI.pdf

I'd like to see where this novel idea of their goes; I mean, how do you make a tram freight-train-collission-proof cheaply, huh? (Cheesh!)

In the meantime, they plan on requipping Park Avenue with trams, which isn't turning out to be popular with Montrealers (myself included).




Quote:
Originally Posted by dwdwone View Post
My understanding is that because the metro runs on rubber tires, it has to be all underground to safeguard it from the freeing temperatures. Is there any truth to this?
Yes, if the transit authority in question doesn`t want to bother itself with snow removal; no, otherwise.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrify View Post
QQ: I know one of the constraints with Montreal's subway is rubber tires and it cannot run outside. But with winter tires, concrete heating, and salting equipment on the trains could they not build an above ground expansion? I mean, buses can run outside in winter with not too much trouble, and many systems don't have winter tires either.
I don`t know. With Toronto`s winters far milder than Montreal`s, I remember being delayed often coming into work mornings because of ice freezing up outdoor points/switches on their steel-to-steel network there, such equipment being miles/stations away from where I boarded and alighted my morning train . . . weather's bad any way you slice it, right?

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Old June 13th, 2008, 04:50 AM   #122
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Was it really worth it?
On the one-year anniversary of the inauguration of Laval's three new stations, questions remain about whether the $745-million investment is paying off

26 April 2008
Montreal Gazette

Riding the métro from Laval into Montreal during the morning rush hour, Louise Privée is pleased, even if having a seat is too much to hope for.

"I like it a lot," she said of the new Laval line. "There's never enough places to sit, but it's still more comfortable than the bus." One year after the three- station, 5.2-kilometre métro extension into Laval was officially inaugurated on April 26, Laval commuters and Montreal's métro authorities are understandably pleased, although legions of seatless riders and overflowing métro parking lots indicate the new line has quickly become a victim of its own success and questionable planning.

Daily ridership emanating from the three Laval stations has risen to 60,000 passengers per weekday (approximately 30,000 leaving in the morning and returning in the evening), 20 per cent higher than the 50,000 that were projected to be using it after one year.

But riders like Privée also resurrect the question of whether the $745-million investment was worth it in the first place.

Privée used to ride the bus from her home in the Vimont sector to the Henri Bourassa métro station in Ahuntsic, just across the water from Laval, then take the métro to her Old Montreal workplace, a commute of about an hour and five minutes.

Now she takes a half-hour bus ride to get to the Cartier station in Laval and rides for another half-hour to work - a savings of five minutes.

The MTC estimates that as few as 2,000 users of the Laval line might be new users. This means the vast majority were already using public transit, so only a relatively small number of cars have been taken off the roads thanks to the métro. (One wag wrote The Gazette to say that even if there were 3,000 new users, it still works out to $248,000 per person, so why not just buy them all condominiums in Montreal instead?) "If it's just bus rides that are being replaced, then it's a very expensive solution to a basic problem," said Murtaza Haider, a professor at McGill University and Ryerson University in Toronto specializing in public transportation and urban planning. A better and much less costly idea would have been to improve the bus system, he said.

Laval Mayor Gilles Vaillancourt begs to differ.

"Buses," he said, in the same tone one would use for the word cockroaches. "It's been 30 years that I've been hearing that and it doesn't impress me at all. You cannot convert new users to a bus system. You have to give them a real alternative, and that alternative we now know is the métro." Buses get stuck in traffic jams and snow storms, and are more costly to operate per user than subway trains, he said. Buses cost $4.75 per user per trip, as compared to under $3 for the métro system, he said.

Montrealers forced to wait as métro cars packed with Laval residents sailed by them inundated the MTC with complaints in the months following the line's opening. There were more than 400 complaints in nine months, compared with the 122 complaints registered the year before in the same period, Radio-Canada reported, citing documents obtained through the Access to Information Act.

"Of course, it is a success; we are very happy with the high numbers, but there are complaints and we're trying to reduce those to a minimum," said MTC spokesperson Marianne Rouette, adding that the number of complaints dropped 60 per cent in January and February from the initial levels.

To cope with demand, the MTC has increased frequency by 17 per cent since January, is modifying train cars to hold more passengers, and has upped the number of trains on the Orange Line from 29 to 33, running every 31/2 minutes at rush hour, Rouette said.

One out of every two southbound trains leaves directly from Henri Bourassa, ensuring Montrealers will have room, Rouette said.

"We can't get the complaints to zero; that would take a miracle," she said. "And the miracle is when the new trains come." New trains are expected by 2012 or 2013, she said.

The growing pains are a good thing, said Normand Parisien, executive director of the Quebec branch of advocacy group Transport 2000, because they will spur improvements to Montreal's aging fleet, much of it nearing 45 years old.

Fighting against métro systems is difficult because they're popular with the public, he said. It didn't help that the Parti Québécois government of Lucien Bouchard severely lowballed the construction estimate at $179 million when it promised the venture during pre-election season in 1998.

"We wish the best for the new system," Parisien said, even though the group has protested against it for 15 years as a costly investment for such a short distance.

"People are happy with the métro, but they have to realize it reduces the margin to manoeuvre for other projects." The métro construction soaked up $745 million in tax dollars that won't go to health care, pothole repairs or upgrades to Montreal's existing transit system, Haider said.

Both the MTC and the Metropolitan Transit Agency, the provincial body that oversees transit planning in the Montreal region, are quick to note the Laval line was a political decision.

"The government decided the métro should be extended to Laval, and we'll live with the decision," said Marvin Rotrand, vice-chairman of the MTC board and a Montreal city councillor, noting that the line appears to be a success.

"Clearly the city would have preferred an extension of the Blue Line east toward St. Léonard, Montreal North and Rivière des Prairies, where there is a very large population." The MTA is working on a study for an extension of the Blue Line to the east, as well as an extension of the Orange Line north for two stops beyond Côte Vertu into St. Laurent, the scene of heavy housing development in the last decade. Vaillancourt is pushing for a further 10-kilometre extension of the Laval line that would hook up with the other end of the Orange Line, completing the loop.

"The Laval line is proof that if you build it, they will come," said Joël Gauthier, president and CEO of the Metropolitan Transit Agency, adding that the ease of métro travel makes it a greater draw than the bus.

But the Blue Line running from Snowdon to St. Michel puts the lie to that theory, Haider said. Built 22 years ago, it is still underused, showing that only population density guarantees a proper return on métro investment. (An extension eastward would solve that problem, Gauthier said.) Similar complaints have been made about the line that extends to Longueuil.

To Haider, the Laval extension is a waste no matter how many riders use it.

"If I had $800 million, I would have invested in transit efficiency by reducing wait times for buses and replacing the aging fleet of métros," Haider said, noting that it's unfair that service for Montrealers has worsened as a result of the Laval métro line, considering they pay the bulk of the operating costs.

"Montreal is such a cold city. When you see people waiting outside in minus 30C, and they don't know if the bus will come in five minutes or 25 minutes, that rider will be lost as soon as they can afford a vehicle." A Léger Marketing survey conducted for Le Journal de Montréal and TVA and made public this week found that 60 per cent of all Quebecers use cars to get to work; but half said they might switch to public transit if service improved. Many respondents complained that public transit now takes too long, is too crowded or just doesn't exist in their neighbourhood.

Vaillancourt brushes off the anti-métro sentiment, saying it only exists in Montreal, which would rather take the view "that nobody exists except them." The fact the métro is overcrowded and métro station parking lots holding 2,000 cars are full is proof the system is a success, he said. He estimates the number of new users at 4,000 to 5,000. Transport Quebec does not have statistics yet on what effects, if any, the métro has had on traffic patterns.

"Who else has been able to divert 5,000 cars?" he asked. "Nobody but Laval." For passengers like Laval resident Marco Nocella, the line is the fulfillment of a 30-year-old political promise long overdue.

"Sooner or later it would have to be built," he said. "Might as well do it now. It was necessary."
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Old June 13th, 2008, 06:03 PM   #123
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It will be less crowded if they increased the frequency... A train every 3 1/2 minutes is rubbish.
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Old June 17th, 2008, 08:36 PM   #124
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plus it really doesn't venture into many neighbourhoods -- I'd bet the frequency would be even worse if it went more places here.
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Old June 19th, 2008, 02:09 PM   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Good going because a city two-thirds the size of Toronto has built a subway system with 4 lines versus 3 for Toronto (of which 1 is a subway to nowhere).

Good going because a city two-thirds the size of Toronto has built a subway with as much track as Toronto.

That Montreal could still double its system shouldn't take away from what has been accomplished already. Not only is the Montreal Metro much better looking, and much cheaper to ride on, but Montreal continues to expand the Metro.

Toronto? Fast, efficient, but horrifically ugly and possibly shrinking if you can believe it. The Toronto Transit Commission has stated it's intent to shut down one of the lines due to budget constraints. Torontonians are so used to a such a small subway network that a good chunk of the population thinks another 2 east-west subway lines is over building. To give you an idea of how underbuilt the network is here, consider that the closest east-west line is about 4 km north of the waterfront at Bloor Street. Downtown Toronto exists south of Bloor, but there isn't an east-west subway line in the entire downtown, only along it's northern edge.

Appreciate what you have and keep up the steady pace of expansion and renewal.
! These are laregly the same issues I myself have with the TTC (or my personal nickname for them... the sTTingy C) and Toronto's subway network.

In the summer of of 2006, I happened to spend a whole week in Montreal (and Ottawa) on vacation. The person I went with insisted we rent a car. But after a day or two we came to realize the extensiveness of Montreal's metro was so convenient that we had no need for the rental car.

Our motel was on the outskirts of town near Laval but luckily it was only a minutes walk from Suave Station. In the downtown everywhere was walking distance from a Metro. It was so convenient and made me green with envy that their downtown was so well connected, while Toronto's was . I didn't even get to ride all the lines, but instead used the rental car only to later find out some of the places we went were nearby a Metro (Mont Royal, Cote Neiges, Namur, Pie Ix).

Contrasting Toronto and Montreal, Montreal's system is far superior since as you've pointed out urban Montreal is smaller in surface area than Toronto yet a subway line seems to extend throughout most of the inner city and even offers good service into the suburbs (La Salle, Ahuntsic, East Montreal, Longueuil.). If only Toronto could follow Montreal's example.

Why are new metro lines there being built for under $1 billion with the end-result of ultra-modern, spacious stations? The Sheppard Line, which runs in the suburbs north of the 401, cost nearly $3 billion to build and now sits virtually empty and underused through off-peak. Seeing that cost-recovery is non-existant, it's actually funds from other transit projects yhat's needed to keep the line operational.
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Old June 19th, 2008, 05:37 PM   #126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DENTROBATE54 View Post
....so convenient....so convenient....made me green with envy....so well connected....far superior....ultra-....
Their appearances and noisiness aside, me, I find the networks darn-right similar.



Du Métro d'aujourd'hui (http://www.journalmetro.com/linfo/article/71503) :

Plus de policiers... plus de crimes!
MARIE-EVE SHAFFER, MÉTRO
19 juin 2008 05:00

Depuis que les policiers ont commencé à patrouiller dans le métro il y a un an, le nombre de crimes qui y sont commis a augmenté.

Les délits et les infractions criminels ont ainsi fait un bond de 1,2 % depuis le mois de juin de l’an passé. Selon le Service de police de la Ville de Montréal, cette augmentation est due à la présence policière.

«Nos agents ont fait beaucoup plus d’arrestations d’individus recherchés pour bris de probation ou de condition», a indiqué hier le directeur adjoint du SPVM, Pierre-Paul Pichette.

Le nombre de voies de fait survenues dans le métro est passé de 225 en 2006-2007 à 238 en 2007-2008. C’est l’augmentation des actes de violence commis contre les policiers qui explique cette hausse, selon le SPVM.

«Il y a beaucoup plus d’interventions des policiers dans le réseau du métro, et [ils] travaillent avec des individus qui ont davantage besoin d’aide que d’être confrontés à un système de loi», a fait savoir M. Pichette.

En revanche, les vols qualifiés, les agressions armées et les crimes contre la propriété ont connu une baisse, respectivement de 18,4 %, de 30 % et de 14,6 %.

Environ 800 000 déplacements s’effectuent chaque jour dans le métro de Montréal. De ce fait, le responsable de la sécurité publique de la Ville de Montréal, Claude Dauphin, croit que le bilan de la première année de la présence policière dans le métro est somme toute positif.


Plus de pouvoirs

Depuis le 18 juin 2007, les agents de surveillance du métro ont été remplacés par des policiers. Ces derniers ont davantage de pouvoirs que leurs précédesseurs, ce qui leur permet de procéder à des arrestations. «Avant, nous ne pouvions pas en faire», a mentionné le directeur général – exploitation métro, Société de transport de Montréal (STM), Carl Desrosiers.

Pas moins de 46 anciens agents de surveillance de la STM ont réussi à faire la transition, en obtenant un diplôme de l’École nationale de police du Québec.

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Old June 24th, 2008, 01:11 PM   #127
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More people riding bus and metro, Montreal transit authority says
Thu Jun 19, 6:19 PM

MONTREAL (CBC) - The Montreal Transit Corp. says its ridership has increased by nearly four per cent this year compared with last.

The MTC recorded 4.2 million more trips on buses and subways between January and April 2008, a four per cent increase compared with the same period in 2007.

Improvements to the frequency of transit service and a trio of new metro stations helped drive numbers up, the MTC said Thursday.

About 90 per cent of the reported increase came from metro ridership, which shot up after the MTC opened three new subway stations in Laval, north of Montreal, in May 2007.

The MTC is putting more buses on the road to handle increased passenger volume, said Marvin Rotrand, vice-president of the transit corporation.

"In some areas you'll see far more frequncy outside of rush hour, some of the metro buses will run longer hours, in some areas where there was only service during rush hour there will now be all day service," he said Thursday.

Service will be increased on 12 routes around the city, starting June 23, which will add up to an additional 40,000 hours of bus service every year, Rotrand said.

A new bus route will also be created in the Old Port.
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Old June 24th, 2008, 01:27 PM   #128
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Originally Posted by DENTROBATE54 View Post
! These are laregly the same issues I myself have with the TTC (or my personal nickname for them... the sTTingy C) and Toronto's subway network.

In the summer of of 2006, I happened to spend a whole week in Montreal (and Ottawa) on vacation. The person I went with insisted we rent a car. But after a day or two we came to realize the extensiveness of Montreal's metro was so convenient that we had no need for the rental car.

Our motel was on the outskirts of town near Laval but luckily it was only a minutes walk from Suave Station. In the downtown everywhere was walking distance from a Metro. It was so convenient and made me green with envy that their downtown was so well connected, while Toronto's was . I didn't even get to ride all the lines, but instead used the rental car only to later find out some of the places we went were nearby a Metro (Mont Royal, Cote Neiges, Namur, Pie Ix).

Contrasting Toronto and Montreal, Montreal's system is far superior since as you've pointed out urban Montreal is smaller in surface area than Toronto yet a subway line seems to extend throughout most of the inner city and even offers good service into the suburbs (La Salle, Ahuntsic, East Montreal, Longueuil.). If only Toronto could follow Montreal's example.

Why are new metro lines there being built for under $1 billion with the end-result of ultra-modern, spacious stations? The Sheppard Line, which runs in the suburbs north of the 401, cost nearly $3 billion to build and now sits virtually empty and underused through off-peak. Seeing that cost-recovery is non-existant, it's actually funds from other transit projects yhat's needed to keep the line operational.
Yes, Toronto's subway 'system' is an embarrassment. I'd trade our subway in for Montreal's without a moments deliberation. I live in central Toronto and can't take a subway downtown. Somethings wrong when you can only leave downtown in one direction: north.
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Old June 25th, 2008, 10:43 PM   #129
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Everything still runs downstream lake- or riverside, huh?

Many morning commuters can't board here either, I'm sure the Laval-extension article somebody pasted earlier on here mentions this.

Hey, I'd bet our stupidity here is supreme, in that we've got ourselves a century-old tunnel servicing barely-hourly electric trains that's just screeching its need for its own metros to intercourse with our crosstown Blue and Green Lines......plus, ever since its erection, the 20-year-old Montréal-Trust tower downtown's been harbouring some shell of half of a transfer station to the McGill station. There's no doubt inaugurating metro service between Bonaventure and Edouard-Montpetit stations would dish up much relief for many a metro commuter here.

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Old July 21st, 2008, 04:47 AM   #130
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A train every 3 1/2 minutes is rubbish.
The initial network used to yield their usual 3.0-minute frequency on all of its first three lines; 1.5-minute was the rush hour norm.

Then they computerized it, such that no train could leave its station if the platform at the next station was occupied by another train...increased frequencies became inevitable.

Then you got a crook of a suburban mayor fostering the longest on-island run between stations that's exceeded only by that inter-island run that undercuts halfway across a segment of the southern leg of the Saint-Lawrence River.

Hmmph.
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Old July 21st, 2008, 01:27 PM   #131
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The initial network used to yield their usual 3.0-minute frequency on all of its first three lines; 1.5-minute was the rush hour norm.

Then they computerized it, such that no train could leave its station if the platform at the next station was occupied by another train...increased frequencies became inevitable.

Then you got a crook of a suburban mayor fostering the longest on-island run between stations that's exceeded only by that inter-island run that undercuts halfway across a segment of the southern leg of the Saint-Lawrence River.

Hmmph.
So were headways every 3 minutes or every 90 seconds, it is not clear from your post.

And why would signalling system make it so that a train cannot leave a platform until the next platform along the line is unoccupied?
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Old August 6th, 2008, 08:22 PM   #132
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So were headways every 3 minutes or every 90 seconds, it is not clear from your post.
3 minutes outside rush hours -- 90 seconds during rush hours





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Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
And why would signalling system make it so that a train cannot leave a platform until the next platform along the line is unoccupied?
This is probably our legacy from pumping out the world's first fully automatic train, L'Express Expo/The Expo Express. The program counts how many revolutions the tyres make; wheel-turn counting and signalling have been strictly kept separate.
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Old August 7th, 2008, 07:50 AM   #133
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Everything still runs downstream lake- or riverside, huh?
I'm still waiting for the 'Downtown Relief Line' to be built. It's in blue. I live just northwest of where that Exhibition subway station would be. Presently, I can't get downtown by subway. I can travel by bus north to Dufferin Station on the Bloor line. Then east by subway to Yonge, then change subway lines to go south to get to Union.

Then I have to hear about suburbanites scream bloody murder that we don't need a new subway line, we just need to build more freeways into the city. It's because of them that there isn't enough political will in Toronto to get this done. It's beyond selfish. People who actually make responsible decisions about where they live, people who actually LIVE in Toronto, are going without proper subway connections, because outsiders want Toronto covered in freeways so they can drive here quicker. It's not like they don't have roads to get here. They want BIG roads. We don't have any route in at all.


You guys in Montreal are very lucky. Montreal Metro rocks!

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Old August 7th, 2008, 06:58 PM   #134
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Yay! somebody's committed the 'relief line' onto some map -- me, I'd have made its bottom segment run under E & W Queen




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Ito hear about suburbanites scream bloody murder that we don't need a new subway line, we just need to build more freeways
Better refer to that lot as (quote) psychopaths.....less painful that way, no?

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Old August 31st, 2008, 07:18 AM   #135
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MTC might zap bug-ridden tickets
Multi-trip cards jam new equipment
'There are still too many problems. I don't want to hide that,' transit official admits

29 August 2008
Montreal Gazette

Persistent technical problems with a $169-million ticketing system could force the Montreal Transit Corp. to abandon its freshly launched six-ticket magnetic cards.

The cards, which were to replace paper tickets by the beginning of 2010, continue to periodically jam and occasionally immobilize the bus and subway ticket-taking equipment recently installed across the system, officials conceded yesterday.

The magnetic-strip cards were launched in both one-trip and six-trip formats late last April.

After glitches quickly arose, the six-trip cards were rapidly pulled from service by the MTC in late May.

Yesterday, officials blamed the bugs on humidity, bent cards and electrical groundings on some buses. The difficulties should not be considered unusual, they said, given that the project requires 9,000 pieces of new equipment to be put into service.

Commuters made about 8.5 million trips using the magnetic cards between April 28 and Aug. 24, and the cards jammed new ticket-taking gear 5,904 times, said Serge Piotte, the MTC's project manager for the new fare system.

"About three-quarters of the time" the problems were with the new electronic farebox on MTC buses, he said. Often the troubles were intermittent and thus difficult to pin down. "It's not one single problem. There are series of difficulties."

Backed into a corner, the transit authority is now "seriously thinking" of just dropping the six-trip card altogether, MTC chairperson Claude Trudel said.

Transit officials still hope not to be forced into taking that drastic step, both Piotte and MTC spokesperson Marianne Rouette insisted,

"The volume of transactions" using the magnetic-strip cards "has tripled during the past two months," Piotte said, "but the number of problems has doubled.

"So the proportion of problems is going down - but not as fast as it should.

"There are still too many problems. I don't want to hide that."

The MTC hopes to resume sales of the six-trip cards "in several weeks," Rouette said, after pinning down and fixing the buggy performance.

However, she added, she could not provide a new target date for any such resurrection.

In some cases, a user's magnetic multi-trip card has been swallowed by the new equipment and the passenger was forced to trek to one of five MTC service centres to collect a refund.

That happened to " fewer than 1,000" customers since spring, Piotte estimated

During the past few months, Rouette and other public-relations staff at the MTC had continually played down snags in the new system.

After the MTC stopped selling the six-trip card in May, it waited more than a month before it acknowledged the backtrack.

Rouette had insisted July 7 that "the only reason" six-trip cards had been dropped for the summer was a desire to ease congestion for specific events "such as the jazz festival and Just for Laughs." She said then that the MTC would reinstate sales of the six-trip card Sept. 2, - which falls on Tuesday next week.
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Old September 4th, 2008, 10:25 PM   #136
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Multi-trip cards jam new equipment
Funny, coz their queue-jamming's what'd been more apparent...
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Old September 15th, 2008, 10:12 PM   #137
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Heh heh...Montréal's fully indoor network is susceptible to the weather after all. The humidity from Ike's remnants caused equipment failure whereby sections of the Orange and Blue Lines failed this morning. These failures occurred after keeping the trains running all night in the hopes their motors would be dry enough, etc., instead of stabling them in the garages (underground depots).
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Old September 16th, 2008, 07:38 PM   #138
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Two articles this morning:

Métro's Orange Line faces more slowdowns
Montreal Gazette
Published: 4 hours ago (0809 Hours EDT)
MONTREAL - The Montreal Transit Commission Tuesday morning announced that service on the métro's Orange Line could be interrupted for brief periods of time throughout the day.

Service was interrupted for several minutes around 7:20 Tuesday morning between the Bonaventure and Beaubien stations.

On Tuesday morning, an MTC spokesperson said the delays are directly related to Monday's problems when excessive humidity caused circuit breakers to blow, cutting power to the Orange Line and halting service several times between 7 and 11 a.m.

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Métro breakdowns blamed on humidityOrange line's circuit breakers trip. Condensation on electrical equipment results in delays affecting 25,000 users

JAMES MENNIE
The Gazette

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

If you fought your way through the remnants of Hurricane Ike yesterday morning to reach a métro station only to discover the subway wasn't running, the Montreal Transit Corp. has a message for you: It wasn't the hurricane, it was the humidity.

At least 25,000 commuters were delayed, stranded or packed into métro trains as a series of power failures interrupted subway service between 7 and 11 a.m.

The MTC says the outages were caused by the blanket of humid air that preceded Sunday night's high winds, ultimately prompting circuit breakers to cut power on the Orange Line.

"It was entirely due to the humidity," MTC spokesperson Marianne Rouette said of the power failures that halted service on the métro's busiest route.

"The first incident occurred at 7:05 a.m. between Snowdon and Bonaventure stations and lasted about 40 minutes," she said. "The second occurred at 8:14 a.m. between Villa Maria and Côte Vertu, and it was during that outage that service was lost along the length of the Orange Line."

Service was restored at 9:05 a.m. - only to be knocked out an hour later between Snowdon and Côte Vertu stations for 40 minutes, Rouette said.

Another disruption, between Bonaventure and Snowdon, occurred at 4:10 p.m. and lasted 18 minutes. At 6:53 p.m., power to the Orange Line between Lionel Groulx and Beaubien stations went out for 48 minutes.

Humidity was also blamed for the mechanical breakdown of two of the 10 métro trains serving the Blue Line, Rouette said.

Dominique Lemay, the MTC's director of operations, acknowledged that hot and humid weather doesn't usually lead to a breakdown of subway service.

"The métro runs during heat waves, but at that time the air in the tunnels is also hot," he said. "Since Sunday, we had unseasonably hot and humid weather that was preceded by cool temperature. The air in the métro tunnels being cool, when that humid air circulated, we began getting condensation on everything."

Moisture on wiring and the métro's electrified rails was detected by a system that controls current to the tracks, Lemay said. Circuit breakers automatically cut power as soon as a dangerous level of condensation is reached.

So why didn't breakdowns occur on other métro lines?

Lemay has a theory: Trains on the Orange Line date from the 1970s and run on a higher level of current than the older models operating on the Green Line. "That higher tension of current makes the breakers (on the Orange Line) even more sensitive."

Hydro-Québec was blaming the remnants of Hurricane Ike for blackouts that affected 18,000 customers on Montreal Island and 10,000 on the South Shore. The utility said power was to be restored by this morning.

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Last edited by trainrover; September 16th, 2008 at 07:43 PM.
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Old September 17th, 2008, 06:26 PM   #139
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(Again) two articles today.....in the first one, how come the short subway under the river didn't suffer this week around like it did in 2003 is being asked while, me, I reckon it'd be safe to say that fewer vents pierce the river subway while the other lines possess many accesses, which allowed for quicker cooling of their tunnelling and equipment before the onslaught of sub-tropically-toned moisture condensing such that it cloak everything.....Snowdon's junction corridors facilitating cross-platform transfers glistened SLIPPERY! Sunday (get a load of the tanked floors, eh?):

STM : Le problème sur le point d’être régléMARIE-EVE SHAFFER, MÉTRO
17 septembre 2008 05:00

Le service de métro sur la ligne orange serait en voie d’être complètement rétabli.

«On continue d’investiguer, a indiqué hier la porte-parole de la Société de transport de Montréal, Odile Paradis. Le tronçon où les problèmes se produisent comprend les stations entre Beaubien et Bonaventure.»

Depuis lundi, de fréquentes pertes d’alimen-tation ont provoqué de nombreux arrêts de service sur la ligne orange.

Le taux élevé d’humidité dans les tunnels serait en cause. Le Syndicat des employés techniciens de la STM a pour sa part évoqué l’usure des rails, mais selon Odile Paradis, il n’en est rien.

Des équipes d’entretien ont nettoyé la nuit passée les isolateurs, une des composantes techniques du métro. «On pense que l’opération de nettoyage pourrait vraiment aider à régler la situation», a fait savoir la porte-parole de la STM. La ventilation dans les tunnels a aussi été augmentée pour réduire les impacts de la condensation.

Des pannes de service similaires se sont produites en 2003 sur la ligne jaune après une longue canicule. La STM ignore pourquoi cette fois-ci la ligne orange a été touchée et non une autre.

Si de nouvelles pannes surviennent, des autobus seront disponibles pour faire la navette entre les stations de métro.


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Problems persist in métro tunnelsThe Gazette
Published: 8 hours ago (circa 0400 Hours EDT)
Montreal Transit Corp. officials say they're hoping the subway will be sufficiently dried out this morning to run smoothly. But a transit spokesperson said yesterday that while the problem of high humidity in the métro's Orange Line tunnels seems to have been solved, MTC engineers may now have to deal with an equipment malfunction they suspect is a consequence of the damp air. There was a 19-minute interruption of service on the Orange Line at 7 a.m. yesterday, the MTC's Mariette Rouette said, and then engineers stopped service at 10:15 a.m.for 40 minutes to repair a circuit breaker that regulates the level of current to the track. The engineers suspect the source of the problem may be on a track between Berri-UQÀM and the Sherbrooke station.
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Old September 19th, 2008, 08:29 PM   #140
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new fleet

I'd forgot to share this article:

Slick new métros come with $1.2B price tag
Reduced maintenance costs expected. Bombardier, Alstom bid for contract to replace circa-1960s subway trains

JAMES MENNIE
The Gazette

Friday, August 01, 2008

For $1.2 billion, you'll be able to walk from one end of your métro train to the other, have less of a chance the subway train's doors will close on you and maybe - just maybe - have an air-conditioned ride during the summer months.

The Montreal Transport Corp. is shopping around to buy 342 new métro cars to replace a fleet of subway trains that have been in service since the mid-1960s.

And MTC chairperson Claude Trudel told reporters yesterday that the transit authority has earmarked $1.2 billion for the purchase - $800 million for the cars, the rest for training, renovation of the existing métro system to accommodate the new cars, interest costs and inflation.

Three-quarters of the contract will be paid for by the provincial government, the remaining 25 per cent by the MTC.

The trains sought by the MTC will be single-bodied, allowing passengers access from one end of the vehicle to the other. Cameras will survey the interior of the cars, handicapped access will be improved and transit authority officials say they're contemplating equipping the trains - which will be deployed on the Orange Line between 2012 and 2014 - with air conditioning.

"Montrealers are going to be seeing the kind of métro train they've never seen before," said MTC director of operations Carl Desrosiers during a briefing session on the purchase held by the transit authority.

"There will be more space inside ... and this train will be less expensive to maintain."

Other differences Montrealers will notice on the trains include:

n Three doors per car, one fewer than on the models now in service but wider and installed on the outside of the train. This allows the subway car's walls to be thinner and its floorspace correspondingly larger, permitting more passengers to be accommodated per train.

Each door will be controlled independently by its own sensor system rather than a driver opening and closing all the train's doors at once, meaning reopening the door if someone gets stuck in it will less time consuming.

"Sometimes, in (a crowded station), it's very difficult for a driver to efficiently close (all) the doors, there's always somebody getting their briefcase stuck," Desrosiers said. "When the driver has to reopen and close the doors, there's a chance someone else gets stuck trying to get on - the train can be stuck for a minute or a minute and half.

"That can be a problem because there's a two-minute, 20-second interval between trains, and that delay can go all the way down the line. "

n Wheelchair access will be provided - two spaces at each end of the train, while chairs with flip-up seats will allow cyclists and commuters pushing strollers more room. While that access will be available by 2014, Trudel did acknowledge the MTC is still in the middle of a 20-year project to make all its stations accessible to wheelchairs.

n Surveillance cameras will be activated whenever an emergency brake is pulled, a door becomes stuck or someone picks up an intercom phone to speak to the driver.

n A signal will sound when the métro doors are about to close, and a light above the door will give the same message to commuters who are hard of hearing.

n The possibility the new trains will be air conditioned. Desrosiers was less than sanguine about the prospect, saying it would be expensive and air conditioned trains would end up blowing their heat exhaust into the stations they pulled in to.

Today's call for tenders by the transit authority ends a five-month detour on the MTC's road to replacing its aging fleet of MR-63 subway cars - the shaking, rattling, patched-up models commuters ride on the subway's Green Line - some of which have been in service since the subway opened in 1966.

Last February, the Quebec government decided not to appeal a Superior Court judgment that rules the contract to construct the subway cars, which was given to Bombardier Inc., had to be subject to a bidding process.

The court ruling, rendered a month earlier, was the result of a challenge of Quebec's decision by Alstom Canada Inc.

The MTC started a bidding process from scratch, an operation that included providing Alstom all information about the contract already provided to Bombardier.

Desrosiers said that even then, every foreign manufacturer that might have been interested in bidding on the contract also had to be brought up to speed.

"In the end, however," he said, "the only firms that were interested were Bombardier and Alstom."

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