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Old November 17th, 2008, 06:46 PM   #81
wronny
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... and a beautiful Milan pic at the beginning of last century:

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Old November 17th, 2008, 10:08 PM   #82
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Malmö's tram network with some 10 lines was discontinued in 1973. The city is currently planning a LRT system to be up and running some time around 2020 again.

South St. anno 1913


Bergsgatan anno 1913


Gustav Adolf's Sq. anno 1923
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Old November 18th, 2008, 01:45 PM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wronny View Post
... and a beautiful Milan pic at the beginning of last century:

Milan still has trams I suppose. This thread is about tram networks that have completely disappeared like London's trams.
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Old November 18th, 2008, 09:16 PM   #84
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I found this on Chicago from the historical society:

Horses pulled the first streetcars, but soon San Francisco pioneered a new system, with cars hooked to a moving cable underneath the street. Chicago's lines were steadily rebuilt in the 1880s until the city had the world's largest cable-car system.

In the meantime, Eastern cities were experimenting with electric streetcars that drew their power from a wire strung over the tracks, a method imitated in Chicago beginning in the 1890s.

By World War I, the city's trolleys held all the records: The street railroads had more miles of track, had the longest one-fare ride, the longest average ride, operated over more routes and kept more electric cars running than any other city in the world. In 1929, when the fare was 7 cents, Chicago's streetcars carried nearly 900 million passengers.

It had thousands of carriages, and employed over 16,000 people in Chicago.










Last edited by Chicagoago; November 18th, 2008 at 09:39 PM.
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Old November 21st, 2008, 02:49 AM   #85
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Amsterdam

In 1875 the horsecar was introduced in Amsterdam. In 1900 there were 15 lines and 242 tramcars.

Around 1900 on the Dam:


Between 1900 and 1906 virtually all were lines were replaced by electric cars.

The network expanded to 25 lines in 1930, had 445 trams (+350 additional wagons). Virtually every area in Amsterdam was covered by the tram.

From 1932 some lines were replaced by more flexible busses.

The Second World War had a big impact, because many trams went to Germany, and there was a short of supply on anything in the winter of 1944 (coal to run the cars and wood to support the rails were used by people itself). Also worth mentioning is 'The Strike of February 1941' were members of the local tram networks quickly joined a general strike in Amsterdam against the razzias held (against Jews). There were suddenly no trams around, so people knew that something happened. Tram line 8 was used to transport Jews and other people to concertration camps, after the war this number has never been used again.

After the war there were less trams and many former lines were replaced by busses. But certain streets were very narrow to run busses in and this kept the tramnetwork alive in Amsterdam. From 1955 there was a new period for the tram in Amsterdam. Many old lines were re-used again or expanded.

image hosted on flickr


Although a nice plan for a serious subway system in 1968, only a small part has been build until now. In the past not because they had to destroy a lot of old buildings (many people were against it), later not because the ground is very difficult.

Today there are 16 tram lines, 246 trams (mostly Combino's with a capacity of 180).

One of the more difficult streets in Amsterdam (Leidsestraat):
image hosted on flickr


Tram in the Zuidas area:
image hosted on flickr
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Old November 21st, 2008, 03:57 AM   #86
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I really don't like the look of the Combino for some reason. Especially the front looks like someone patched together a bunch of plywood pieces or something.
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Old November 22nd, 2008, 11:12 AM   #87
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Does anyone has pictures and information about trams of NYC?
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Old November 22nd, 2008, 03:10 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serdar samanlı View Post
Does anyone has pictures and information about trams of NYC?
Sorry, not a pic, but here's a video I like of trolleys in Brooklyn:



Even older footage:



A bit of history:

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Old October 7th, 2009, 11:13 PM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by staff View Post
I really don't like the look of the Combino for some reason. Especially the front looks like someone patched together a bunch of plywood pieces or something.
I share your opinion, but with most of the tram design in hands of Germans there's little chance for a progressive design. Something really modern. Something that would make you go "wow" after it served for 50 years. Like the PCC.

No, that won't happen.
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Old October 8th, 2009, 10:57 AM   #90
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Thanks to Edward N. Kuijper and Evert Huisinkveld I can show you images of (the last years of) an important part of SNCV's tram network, the lines around Brussels and Brabant, Belgium. Most images were shot in the early 1960s to early 1970s. The network was almost 5000 kms in 1945, but quickly declined between 1950 and 1970. The last SNCV line in Brabant and Brussels (line G) was closed in the summer of 1978.

Very rare colour images of line W:
http://www.drehscheibe-foren.de/fore...php?17,4408542

http://home.planet.nl/~kuijp086/deel1En.html
http://home.planet.nl/~kuijp086/deel2En.html
http://home.planet.nl/~kuijp086/deel3En.html
http://home.planet.nl/~kuijp086/deel3IEn.html
http://home.planet.nl/~kuijp086/deel3JEn.html

More on http://home.planet.nl/~kuijp086/

And to finish, two beautiful colour images from SSC member focus1965:

A type 'S' tram in Lasne, Brabant Wallon, on the line running from Brussels, place Rouppe to Waterloo and Wavre.
[IMG]http://i27.************/2e4cmm9.jpg[/IMG]

Another type 'S' in Waterloo (which is pretty obvious to tourists who have visited the site of the battle)
[IMG]http://i29.************/28isp47.jpg[/IMG]

cheers
JJN

Last edited by JayBeeke; October 8th, 2009 at 11:08 AM.
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Old October 8th, 2009, 11:47 PM   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyronin View Post
Toronto's streetcars have been around for well over a hundred years and still continue to run and be a very popular mode of transportation, despite being displaced by subways and buses as the most used.

1924


1929
I only wished the TTC saved more Peter Witt cars (both the large witts and small witts), as they were probably one of the nicest streetcars around during their era.
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Old October 9th, 2009, 12:12 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serdar samanlı View Post
Milan still has trams I suppose. This thread is about tram networks that have completely disappeared like London's trams.
Yes, Milano has still 18 tramway lines.

That picture is particular because describes the so-called "carosello" in piazza del Duomo disappered during the early last century.

There are no tramway lines in piazza del Duomo anymore.
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Old October 12th, 2009, 02:11 PM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serdar samanlı View Post
Milan still has trams I suppose. This thread is about tram networks that have completely disappeared like London's trams.
Current network (still one of the largest in the world) only partly is what once was Milan's tram network
Over all in city centre the network was way larger and pratically every street got a tramway track: I don't know how many kms of old tracks were dismissed in past decades but they are for sure many-many-many dozens. In many streets they left dismissed rails which can show how massive was the network also in the past
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Old October 13th, 2009, 04:52 PM   #94
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Czech republic

Lost tram networks
- Bohumín (1902-1973)
- České Budějovice (1909-1950, electric public transport replaced by trolley-buses, 1991-today)
- Jablonec (1900-1965, one line until today as an outskirt one of Liberec tram network, towns' trams managed by common company)
- Jihlava (1909-1948, electric public transport replaced by trolley-buses, 1948-today)
- Mariánské lázně (1902-1952, electric public transport replaced by trolley-buses, 1953-today; supposed to be the world smallest town with its own trolley-bus network, pop 14 k)
- Opava (1905-1956, electric public transport replaced by trolley-buses, 1952-today)
- Teplice (1895-1959, electric public transport replaced by trolley-buses, 1952-today)
- Ústí nad Labem (1899-1970, electric public transport replaced by trolley-buses, 1984-today)
- Těšín/Cieszyn (1911-1921)

Existing tram networks
Except Prague, where several tram routes had been removed in 1970's and 1980's because of metro expandation, other Czech cities with existing tram work hadn't experienced mass removing. Their current tram network is usually the densiest ever. I cannot find exact data for Prague before 1974 (first metro line). Just have a map with 35 day tram lines from 1969, so of nine more then today, 26.
There are 7 Czech towns and cities with tram network today:
- Prague
- Brno
- Ostrava
- Plzeň
- Liberec (Jablonec incl.)
- Olomouc
- Most (Litvínov incl.)

Last edited by ov_79; October 13th, 2009 at 04:59 PM.
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 04:45 PM   #95
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A couple of sites with pics of Sunderlands old trams. The network closed in 1954 and I don't have a clue how long or how many lines there were.

http://www.picturesofgateshead.co.uk...ms2/index.html

http://dewi.ca/trains/sunderla/index.html

You can still travel on a renovated Sunderland tram at Beamish Museum about 11 miles west of Sunderland.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/andrew....eamish/16.html
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 08:50 PM   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme View Post
A great thread. So, so far we have the following identified at their max level...

Moscow: 1000km+ (Coth, do you have exact length of route km?)
Berlin: 650km (1929)
London 555km (192x?)
Rome: 400km (1929)
Sydney: (nearly) 300km (1930)'s (Sirhc8, do you have exact figures for route km?)
Melbourne: 245km (Present)
Brisbane: 109km (1952)

Let's keep adding to this list! I think this will also be one transport thread where North America and in particular, the U.S. will do very well, as the U.S. had some mammoth tram networks in it's day.

Porto has the top extension in the tram network in 1950 with 150km.

The network started in 1872 and nowadays has 4 lines, were are used old trams in the older parts of the city and in the river front (a beautiful ride , i can said)

Here is the link to the wikipedia page about the trams (eléctricos) in Porto.

Or this simple web site(very simple) with the history and some interesting data about the Porto tram.
http://tram-porto.ernstkers.nl/index.htm

I didn´t found yet the map of the network in full scale but i promisse to post it
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Old November 24th, 2009, 12:26 AM   #97
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I always liked mass transit systems, and when i found out Baton Rouge, La (my hometown) used to have streetcars, it made me sad because to would have been cool for BR to have one.

Anyway, New Orleans, La, still has streetcars, so here are some pictures.



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Old November 24th, 2009, 03:40 AM   #98
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San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina) had horse tramways by 1882-1910; electric tramways 1909-1965; and a "suburban" steam tramway route to Yerba Buena by 1916-1929.
The electric system had 6-7 routes served by some 24 motor cars built in Europe (Belgium may be); 7 trailers and more motor cars were added later. Also there was a 3 route trolleybus network by 1955-1962; today there are only diesel buses.
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Old November 25th, 2009, 08:03 PM   #99
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Heidelberg, Germany:

- 1885: horse tram network started
- 1886: horse tram network extended to 3.7 km
- 1890: OEG rail line to Weinheim, 16 km, steam trains, partially roadbound
- 1891: OEG rail line to Mannheim, 26 km, steam trains, partially roadbound
- 1901: first overland tram line to Wiesloch, 13 km, electric
- 1902-1904: horse tram network replaced by electric trams, extended throughout city
- 1910: 3 km branch line from the Wiesloch line to Kirchheim built
- 1910-1914: electric tram line to neighboring Neckargemünd
- 1914-1918: electric tram line to neighboring Eppelheim
- 1923-1925: network shut down due to economic crisis
- 1926: tram line to Wieblingen in direct competition to OEG
- 1927: tram line to Eppelheim extended to Schwetzingen
- 1929: integration of tram and OEG lines in city, both using each others tracks
- 1945: tram network shut down for 6 months
- 1955: Heidelberg Central Station moved 2 km west
- 1956: new tram lines to new Central Station built
- 1962: tram line to Neckargemünd cut to east end of Heidelberg Old Town
- 1966: tram line to Wieblingen shut down
- 1972: tram line between Rohrbach and Kirchheim shut down
- 1973: tram line to Schwetzingen cut back to Eppelheim
- 1976: tram line through Heidelberg Old Town shut down
- 1986-1995: short extensions in New University area
- 2006: new 4.6 km tram line to Kirchheim built

Minor "corrections" not named.

Current network length within city limits: ~30 km (without OEG light rail lines) (ca 2009)
Maximum network length within city limits: ~35 km (without OEG light rail lines) (ca 1960)

Current tram network outside city limits: ~ 4 km (without OEG light rail lines) (ca 2009)
Maximum tram network outside city limits: ~20 km (without OEG light rail lines) (ca 1960)

Rough map (OEG lines cut at city limits):



Color code:

Yellow - built before WW2, active
Green - built before WW2, shut down

Light Orange - built after WW2, 1950s
Dark Orange - built after WW2, 1980s to current
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Old November 26th, 2009, 01:19 AM   #100
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http://hla.buxcom.net/langhorne_trolley.htm

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