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Old November 20th, 2005, 04:48 AM   #1
spyguy
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Suburban Development News (DuPage, Lake, McHenry, Kane, Will, and More)

Please post developments and news articles on large condo developments of significant height (not just three floors).
DO NOT post subdivision cookie-cutter crap unless there is something marvelous about it, which will not be the case 99.9% of the time.


For suburban TOD see TUP's thread and for suburban Chicago info check BVictor's thread.

This thread is meant to showcase condo developments. Other acceptable posts could relate to downtown transformations, significant retail (not just strip malls), or some architectural marvel planned for the suburbs.

The reason I created the thread was to create a place for a lot of the interesting news articles I've run across for many months. It will probably become similar to Steely's Under 12 Story thread over at SSP in the sense that not too many of these buildings go above 12 floors, but there are many of 5-10 floors.

Anyway, I'll start adding to it as I go along. Feel free to post anything you see.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Recently Completed
Schaumburg Corporate Center III - 2002
184 ft, 18 floors
Schaumburg

Harrah’s East Chicago Casino Hotel - 2001
179 ft, 15 floors
East Chicago

Arlington Town Square - 2000
138 ft, 13 floors
Arlington Heights

Under Construction
Lombard Westin Hotel
223 ft, 19 floors
Lombard


Optima Old Orchard Woods
196 ft, 20 floors
Skokie


Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel
187 ft, 17 floors
Schaumburg


Westin North Shore
181 ft, 17 floors
Wheeling


Condominium Residences at Seven Bridges
140 ft, 12 floors
Woodridge


Proposals
Joliet Towers
??? ft, 20 floors
Joliet


Le Meridien Chicago O’Hare
??? ft, 16 floors
Rosemont


Riviera Christian Living Resort
??? ft, 14 floors
Des Plaines


Harlem-Ontario Apartments
??? ft, 14 floors
Oak Park


Fairfield Inn
??? ft, 13 floors
Naperville

Last edited by spyguy; July 18th, 2006 at 03:49 AM.
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Old November 20th, 2005, 04:57 AM   #2
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Let's start with good ol' Wheaton. Probably one of the better chances

Wheaton explores downtown options

By James Fuller
Daily Herald Staff Writer
Posted Saturday, November 19, 2005

There are more than a few resale shops in downtown Wheaton that don’t yield a whole lot of foot traffic.

There are also more than a few buildings with no shops at all.

But, as Wheaton officials recently found out, there are also more than a few dollars available to do something about it.

A number of years ago, the city created a special tax district to funnel taxes collected from downtown properties back into the business district to help it grow and improve. That Tax Increment Finance District No. 2 is in solid financial shape, according to an analyst’s report commissioned by the city.

The report said the city essentially has $6 million to $10 million to continue rejuvenating the downtown area. Officials are already looking at ways to do that.

Mayor Jim Carr told residents at a forum this week that two downtown residential projects under construction are seeds for growth that will add more than 400 living spaces and a new pool of potential customers to the downtown.

Those are Courthouse Square, the conversion of the old courthouse and jail into luxury townhouses and condominiums and, across the tracks, Wescott Crossing in the former Bank One building, which includes retail and residential units.

The idea is to create the demand that will bring in the supply. For downtown Wheaton, the desired supply is retail shopping.

There are two moves afoot that will attempt to create retail space.

The first was the city negotiating to buy land just north of the downtown Jewel, property formerly occupied by the old Chicago Title Co. building.

Three plans came in this week envisioning various forms of a mix of retail and office space on the site.

“Two appear to be relatively simplistic and good,” City Manager Don Rose said at first glance. “One is very ambitious, much bigger than the other projects.”

Regardless of which project is ultimately selected, if any, the move to add a retail-office building on the site is exactly what downtown needs, said Carla Spielman of the Downtown Wheaton Association.

“There’s retail on that block already, but it’s been kind of off on its own, unfortunately,” she said. “Anything that’s going to tie in more retail on that block with office space to support that will be positive.”

The second move is also one Spielman said she supports.

The city has been engaged in a long legal battle to take two buildings along Main Street from their owner, Bob Sandberg. The city has already won the right to buy the buildings for a fair price, Rose said. The outstanding issue is what that fair price will be.

“These have basically been empty buildings for the last 20 years,” Rose said. “The occupancy of them by viable retail businesses is certainly the goal of the acquisition.”

Sandberg could not be reached for comment.

Making the buildings ready for occupancy could be difficult. One method would involve knocking them down and starting over. The second would involve intense renovation, similar to the work done on the Atten Building, which is currently occupied by Quiznos sub shop and other businesses.

Renovations to the façade and other parts of the building have gone on for months now and resulted in litigation. Quiznos has sued the landlord, Jim Atten, for issues stemming from the ongoing construction.

Still, Rose is hopeful other businesses and landlords make use of the money available in the TIF district for similar work.

“That litigation is something between the tenants and the owner,” Rose said. “Unfortunately, like so many of our buildings downtown, there’s been limited maintenance and enhancement to that building over the years. You get to the point where you have to make some significant repairs, but that building has gone from a third-rate building to a first-class building.”

City officials and the city council will be reviewing the plans for the old Chicago Title site in the coming months. When the litigation for the Sandberg buildings are complete, the city will request similar proposals from developers for those sites.
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Old November 20th, 2005, 05:07 AM   #3
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Here's Courthouse Square:
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Old November 20th, 2005, 03:42 PM   #4
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^ Wasn't the red brick courthouse most recently part of the "National-Louis University" vocational school. I think another building of that school is still visible on the far left in that picture.

I'm so glad they're keeping that old brick building, as its own of the most beautiful buildings in that area.
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Old November 21st, 2005, 05:18 AM   #5
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It's an important building I suppose. Rather nice looking too. I love how those Wheaton people went to Naperville at midnight and stole the county records and brought the county seat back to Wheaton.
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Old November 22nd, 2005, 02:10 AM   #6
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^ explain?
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Old November 22nd, 2005, 02:15 AM   #7
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http://patsabin.com/dupage/courtrecords.htm
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Old November 23rd, 2005, 09:43 PM   #8
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Just stumble on this story. From the Daily Herald:
Developer wants to go up, not out, in Lisle

Developer pitches 22-story complex for vacant office park along Warrenville Road

By Michael Wamble
Daily Herald Staff Writer
Posted Wednesday, November 23, 2005

A 22-story condominium complex? In Lisle?

Walter A. Rebenson says he’s convinced such a project could work and would attract more people — and eventually more business — to the village.

Rebenson, vice president of development for Arlington Heights-based Avalon Bay, has lofty dreams for a $118 million complex with high-end condos and rental units that would be built in a long-vacant office park along Warrenville Road near the North-South Tollway.

But some leaders wonder whether 22 stories is too high. The building would be one of the tallest in DuPage County.

By comparison, the landmark tower in Oakbrook Terrace is 31 stories and the Hyatt Lisle is 13.

“The project is unique for what we have here in Lisle,” Community Development Director Tony Budzikowski said.

Even the main architect, Patrick FitzGerald, initially described the project as an “interesting challenge” given its location next to the Route 53 entrance ramp to the tollway.

But FitzGerald and Rebenson say the height is needed to preserve nearby open space.

“We can’t keep developing out and gobbling up land,” Rebenson said.

So instead of out, he wants to go up.

Though it’s just a concept, Mayor Joseph Broda said it’s an idea worth pursuing given the site’s proximity to Lisle’s Metra station.

As it now sits, Broda said, the location is “an eyesore.”

Such a change would require variances to codes. Lisle restricts the height of multi-family buildings to 50 feet, or about five stories.

“I’m not sure Lisle is ready for 22 stories,” Trustee Kim Brondyke told developers.

Others, though, see a towering landmark as a way to bring a mix of people and businesses to Lisle, much like plans to improve vacant space at the downtown corner of Main Street and Burlington Avenue.

A bistro?

A Starbucks?

Both were suggestions Trustee Joe Schmitt offered for the ground floor of the complex.

“It will also get us closer to get a critical mass of people,” who might frequent restaurants, bars and other Lisle businesses, he said.

Broda has a different idea.

“Before I’d have a Starbucks there, I’d have one downtown,” he said. “I don’t think retail would work there.”

When it comes to consumer traffic, Broda said, “I want them to walk downtown.”
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Old November 24th, 2005, 12:06 AM   #9
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Finally, someone that actually thinks about the consequences of suburban sprawl. Anyway, thanks for posting that cool article. I hope it goes through at the current amount of floors or more. Maybe other towns will see the benefits and take note.
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Old November 24th, 2005, 02:04 AM   #10
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New developments, some fee increases in Roselle’s future

By Kat Zeman
Daily Herald Staff Writer
Posted Friday, November 18, 2005


Roselle residents and business owners will see storm- water improvements, several new developments and probably some fee increases in the next year.

Mayor Gayle Smolinski, who delivered her annual State of the Village Address Tuesday at a Roselle Chamber of Commerce function at Spavone’s Ristorante in Bloomingdale, detailed a number of future changes to face the village.

Among the most noticeable will be the Gables development that features a new hotel, condos, retail space and a gas station at the corner of Gary Avenue and Lake Street. Another development, a project developed by Norwood Builders, will include retail space, condos and several rowhouses on Park and Main streets. Both projects should begin construction in the spring, Smolinski said. The village will also see its second Walgreens open, possibly in February, at Irving Park Road and Maple Avenue.

“Those projects are moving forward,” Smolinski said.

As for downtown redevelopment, the village will look at beautifying the old part of Main Street, from Prospect to Park streets. That could include streetscape and façade improvements, she said. But many residents are wondering about the development of the new downtown along Main Street, from Prospect to Roselle Road. The project was completed last year, but only one retail business has opened so far. Smolinski said the developer has lowered his rates but may be taking too long to close the deal with potential tenants.

“I call them regularly,” she said. “They need to jump on it.”

Besides development, the village plans to increase spending by roughly $600,000 to $700,000 for street improvements throughout the village. It plans to spend about $1.5 million next year. It also plans to make a number of water and sewer improvements. That includes upgrading its two sewer treatment plants and replacing old sewer pipes.

To help pay for it, the village will consider increasing its water and sewer rates by 95 cents per 1,000 gallons and its capital improvement surcharge by 80 cents. For the average resident, it means a total increase of about $10 per month on one’s water and sewer bill.

“It is never pleasant to raise taxes or fees,” Smolinski said. “It is especially not pleasant when the majority of improvements are something that the residents or business owners never see.”

But the village will not raise business license or alarm fees and plans to eliminate dog license fees, she said.
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Old November 24th, 2005, 06:06 PM   #11
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Well, looks like there is no point to all of these threads devoted to suburban development. We'll just make this the suburban thread and be done with it. A thread devoted exclusively to Transit-oriented Development in the suburbs was interesting to me, but it looks like this thread can easily take over that role
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Old December 6th, 2005, 11:50 PM   #12
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http://www.dailyherald.com/search/se....asp?id=129150

Plan to ‘change the face of Addison’ wins approval

By Henry Stuttley

Posted Tuesday, December 06, 2005


In the coming years, Addison will possess what many towns already have: a downtown to call its own.

Saying it’s the single biggest project in the village’s history, Mayor Larry Hartwig is expecting the Town Center redevelopment project to change the entire town.

“Bring out the trumpets,” Hartwig said. “This may be the single-largest project that we will ever embark upon.”

“The expectation is that we will move ahead and it will change the face of Addison.”

Village officials appeared giddy after unanimously approving the roughly 125-acre redevelopment project at Monday night’s village board meeting.

Officials said the redevelopment project will revitalize the area around Lincoln Avenue, Chestnut Street, Green Meadows Drive and Moreland Avenue.

Several old and vacant buildings would have to be razed to make way for the $300 million in private development of condos, parks, office buildings, shops, boutiques, bookstores and restaurants in the designated area, said John Berley, director of Addison’s community development.

Addison is hoping to establish a special taxing district of between $10 million to $12 million to lure developers, but the designated area might not quite be 125 acres, Berley said.

Many condominium developers have already expressed interest in the plan, he said.


“We’re planning to move forward in a TIF that is close to 125 acres,” Berley said, adding the area may have a TIF district by next summer. “It depends on what the market bears.”

Although the village is expected to receive $500,000 over a 10-year period and sales tax income of $700,000, taxpayers may have to cough up between $10 million to $15 million for the project, Hartwig said.

He said he knows there will be major challenges ahead on the redevelopment project on the village’s east side, but that it will be worth the headaches.

“Anything that’s worthwhile will take some work,” Hartwig said at Monday’s meeting.

For more than a year, village officials have worked with business owners, residents on a solid plan.

Addison hired Naperville-based Hitchcock Design Group on a design plan and also conducted a market study on the demographics and shopping trends in the area.

Berley said he expects work to begin on the project by 2007. The entire plan may be complete within the next 20 years.
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Old December 17th, 2005, 09:44 PM   #13
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More on the Addison Downtown Development

- edit
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Old December 20th, 2005, 01:14 AM   #14
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Not quite 12 floors, but 8 is decent enough. This is final phase of a larger development.

Highland Landmark V
Downers Grove, IL





Size:
251,275 Sq. Ft.

Site:
6 Acres

Completion Date:
April 2007

Architect:
Opus Architects & Engineers, Inc.
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Old December 20th, 2005, 05:12 AM   #15
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I'll believe it when I see it... I used to work for Opus and was on the project management team for Highland Landmark IV in 2001. They have been trying to get this started for 4-5 years. The East-West corridor is just too saturated with empty office space.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 03:13 AM   #16
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Good god look at all that parking! That is disgusting. I find it hillaroius that they put in a "nature preserve" that is only a fraction of what the paved over space is just for cars.
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Old December 22nd, 2005, 05:56 AM   #17
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We all need places to train our kids how to operate the family tank when they turn 16.

In other news...

This isn't the 20 story tower we've all been waiting for, but I thought it was really unique for the suburbs.

Mews of In-Town Glen Ellyn, Glen Ellyn
By Lucien Lagrange

8 condos + 24 townhomes
Courtyards, balconies, and get this, underground parking (Naperville residents will flock to see this marvel)

This development sits on the former Glen Ellyn News building of the historic downtown, and so it is close to all the shops and the Metra station.

Lagrange is also promising that each facade will be different, so we shouldn't worry about cookie-cutter crap.

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Old December 22nd, 2005, 06:10 AM   #18
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Believe it or not, that parking at Highland is garage parking (about 4 levels). The only reason the nature preserve is there is because it is wetland. It is nearly impossible to build on or abutting wetlands in DuPage County. Just South of the development is Midwestern University where a huge part of the site is also wetlands (I think they are hydraulically connected).
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Old December 25th, 2005, 05:04 AM   #19
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Found these all from Legat. I'm not sure of each individual project's current status, but these were all rather cool.

The Center of Northshore
Northbrook

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Old December 25th, 2005, 05:10 AM   #20
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Damn, Elgin is booming (for a suburb). Others should take note at their pro-development attitude.

Heard a lot about this one, seems like they're still on the "VIP" stage:
Fountain Square on the River (8 floors)


Water Street Place (10 floors + 3 riverside restaurants)




River Park Place (looks like 7 floors)
Combination of townhomes and condos




Demand is so great that the townhomes supposedly have strong sales and the condos were sold out before construction.

Here's the "Millennium Park" of Elgin that River Park Place looks out over:
Festival Park

Last edited by spyguy999; December 27th, 2005 at 07:12 AM.
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