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Old March 27th, 2008, 10:07 PM   #321
nomarandlee
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Good to see the north sore other then Evanston start to get some TOD, the architecture could be better but its a start. I am trying to think of what stores are there now i am going to have to take a look.
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Old May 2nd, 2008, 02:55 AM   #322
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'Green' is main idea behind HSBC's new headquarters

By Michael Sean Comerford | Daily Herald Staff
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=182739


Environmentally conscious engineering may be all the rage today, but HSBC was building "green" into the design of its Mettawa headquarters from the time construction started two years ago.

The London-based company bought the former Prospect Heights-based Household International in 2003 for about $14 billion and recently moved its North American headquarters to Mettawa.

The facility celebrated its grand opening Wednesday.

The state-of-the-art building, which eventually is to house 3,100 area employees, collects rainwater on its roof and regulates sunlight in its offices.

For all the altruistic intentions the bank may have, HSBC building managers say the new building's "green" features will pay for themselves within five years.

"HSBC's European sales top $115 billion, and it is best known locally for home loans.

Brown said HSBC did not deny him any technological tool in building the new headquarters. The building has two 30,000 gallon tanks buried on the 29-acre campus, collecting rain water for toilets and other non-drinking uses.
The 568,000-square-foot building is shaped like an "X" with a centerpiece and interior features that make it one of the premier buildings in the country.

In addition to a 7,000-square-foot workout room and a meditation room for religious employees, the building is so energy efficient that its goal is to be completely "carbon neutral."

That means some energy will be coming from wind farms in Texas, other energy will be captured from the sun. Windows adjust to the sunlight. Up to 35 percent of the building's energy comes from "sun harvesting."

Even employees are strictly environmentally regimented. All desks must be cleared of paper by evening every day. Cleaning crews work days so they don't have to use lights at night to do their work.

The cafeteria only allows workers to have reusable cups and china plates. The building is cashless, all transactions being taken via electronic cards.


Brown is among the workers who do not have a designated desk because up to 20 percent of HSBC employees are encouraged to take advantage of flexible hours.

Also, the building is hot-wired for Wi-Fi access, making any room a viable work space.

In the midst of all the strategy that went into the building design is an international flavor.

Brown, a 30-year veteran of the former Household Finance, said artwork on the walls is meant to change the culture of employees.

"We want people to start thinking differently," Brown said.

HSBC's 'green' headquarters

• 100 percent of power comes from renewable or non-carbon resources

• Rainwater harvested from roof is used for toilets

• Reusable mugs. Each employee gets a mug; no paper cups allowed.

• Duplex printers print on each side

• No papers on desk. Each night desks are cleaned of paper.
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Old June 13th, 2008, 11:59 PM   #323
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Abbott's new $53 million research facility in Libertyville

http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=206631
By Bob Susnjara | Daily Herald Staff

Drugs that might treat cancer and other deadly diseases are expected to reach the public faster because of work done at Abbott Laboratories' $53 million research and development facility that was unveiled Thursday

Known as the Formulation Development Center, the $53 million Abbott facility is engaged in transforming complex molecules from a laboratory into tablets and capsules. The idea is for those potential oral drugs to be used in pre-clinical and clinical studies to determine safety and intended results, Abbott officials said.

Promising new compounds in the pipeline for hepatitis, Alzheimer's disease and cancer demonstrate the importance of Abbott's new 64,000-square-foot research-and-development structure, which took about three years to construct, said White.

"We don't build a lot of new buildings, especially here at Abbott Park," White said. "But this building was particularly important to us because of its function and because of what it can do for us."
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Old June 30th, 2008, 09:04 PM   #324
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Hello everybody , newbie on the Chicago forum here

Browsing through the floor plans of these developments, it looks like most (if not all) of these buildings are based on the central corridor, single orientation appartment building model !

No appartments buildings are built on an exterior walkway model or "classic multry entry model (as per below) these days in the Chicago area ?



(note, the types further explained below :
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=604687 )

Personnally I think these type of buildings should be strictly forbidden !!

- single orientation being bad in itself in a single flat even if well oriented
- half the flats are somehow "losers"
- it is structurally inefficient to have passive ventilation, key aspect for an energy efficient building.

How about the older appartments buildings in Chicago, are they also like that ?

If there are a few "double orientation buildings" being built, are they regarded as really a plus, or nobody really cares ?

Last edited by Time69; June 30th, 2008 at 11:58 PM.
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Old June 30th, 2008, 11:25 PM   #325
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Historically, Chicago apartments required two means of egress. Thus, virtually all prewar apartments in Chicago are entered from stair-halls rather than interior corridors and have back porches off the kitchen. The classic Chicago courtyard building takes its form from these requirements, with five, seven, or even nine entries from a central courtyard to stair-halls. Prewar walk-up apartment buildings with double-loaded corridors are quite rare in Chicago.

High-rise buildings must have interior corridors for reasons of elevator access. Chicago highrises must have two different exit stairs, in two different fire-containment zones, so Vancouver-style small-footprint towers are virtually impossible here. The main high-rises that come to mind with single-loaded corridors were the now-demolished CHA "gallery" buildings. They were designed that way to give cross-ventilation, to avoid having to heat elevator lobbies, and to give small kids a place to play near the family apartment. It didn't work out very well. I have also been told that Riverbend is single-loaded corridors because the site was so narrow. There are windows on the west side of the apartments and the corridors, so the apartments get western light (but not ventilation).
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Old July 1st, 2008, 12:21 AM   #326
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Downtown View Post
Historically, Chicago apartments required two means of egress. Thus, virtually all prewar apartments in Chicago are entered from stair-halls rather than interior corridors and have back porches off the kitchen. The classic Chicago courtyard building takes its form from these requirements, with five, seven, or even nine entries from a central courtyard to stair-halls. Prewar walk-up apartment buildings with double-loaded corridors are quite rare in Chicago.

High-rise buildings must have interior corridors for reasons of elevator access. Chicago highrises must have two different exit stairs, in two different fire-containment zones, so Vancouver-style small-footprint towers are virtually impossible here. The main high-rises that come to mind with single-loaded corridors were the now-demolished CHA "gallery" buildings. They were designed that way to give cross-ventilation, to avoid having to heat elevator lobbies, and to give small kids a place to play near the family apartment. It didn't work out very well. I have also been told that Riverbend is single-loaded corridors because the site was so narrow. There are windows on the west side of the apartments and the corridors, so the apartments get western light (but not ventilation).
Thanks for your answer, it is somehow a common point that regulations regarding ventilation for kitchens and bathrooms ruled out double loaded corridor buildings around pre ww2 period, and that basically mechanical ventilation, allowing to put bathrooms and kitchens around a common middle core made these double loaded single orientations buildings possible, but we are not really talking high-rise here, more like 6 or 7 storey buildings, and here the reason for double loaded corridors is more pure optimisation by getting the building fatter, typically 18 or 20 meters thick compared to 9 to 12 meters, and reducing the numbers of verticals communications cores.
The concept of the "central entry with lobby", security etc, being also important, interesting to know that the multiple entries in pre war Chicago buildings appartments were more from the court than from the streets.

In any case these double loaded central corridor access "condos" buildings are gross, and should be totally forbidden, it's obvious (even in China they wouldn't dare making such monstruosities, in Russia maybe ...)

Last edited by Time69; July 1st, 2008 at 12:38 AM.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 01:12 AM   #327
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Buildings of 5-7 floors are very uncommon in North American cities. Buildings over five or so stories require multiple elevators and typically must meet high-rise construction and fire codes, so it is uneconomic to not build even higher (10 to 40 stories). The few exceptions are in suburban towns worried about buildings being out of scale with existing two-story business districts.

For high-rise buildings, it is almost impossible to avoid double-loaded interior corridors.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 01:21 AM   #328
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By the way, building high rises retaining a certain sense of dignity for the quality of the flats, that is double orientation, is of course possible. This is what Foster's is doing with the index in Dubai, or what Nouvel plans in LA century city, but it should be reminded that, skyscrapers, or let's say towers, regarding housing, are basically a completely moronic shape, that is it is counter efficient compared to slabs or coutyards with respect to the optimisation of square meters builded per square meters available under a constant natural lighting constraint.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 01:28 AM   #329
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Quote:
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Buildings of 5-7 floors are very uncommon in North American cities.
That's basically what this thread is presenting though (and true high rise "plain tower" type housing buildings should also be forbidden btw)
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Old July 1st, 2008, 05:05 AM   #330
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I'm not sure what argument you are making, or what type of housing you think should be permitted. Natural lighting is certainly not the only consideration, and in a northern continental climate (cold short winter days/hot long summer days), natural lighting is actually fairly unimportant. Residents will be away during winter daylight hours, and must shade summer daylight. Heating is important, so you want to keep interior hallways short. Elevators are required, must be in heated areas, and must be grouped together for redundancy. Many American flats are more than 100 square meters. Luxury apartments in new highrises are often 150 square meters, and towers may have only two to six units per floor.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 05:39 AM   #331
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You seem to be using several terms interchangeably... although I'm glad you provided a diagram.

You also seem to working under the assumption that renters/condo buyers care about natural ventilation and sunlight orientation - in other words, you're thinking like an architecture student. These are important concerns in a building, but keep in mind that other factors - ego, views, parking considerations, et al. - influence the shape of a building more than energy efficiency and optimal density. Plus, as Mr. Downtown has mentioned, local building and zoning codes limit the possibilities.

For example, we were talking a few months ago about a certain tight site in Chicago's South Loop. It could fit large, luxury-sized units in an "outside corridor" configuration, or it could fit smaller studio apartments in a "central corridor" configuration. However, in order to meet the demands of buyers for parking, it needs to have a parking podium - and the site is too narrow to create an efficient parking garage that provides enough spaces and proper auto-circulation routes. Hence, there is little interest in this parcel from real-estate developers. I assume it will be filled in later with some usage that requires less parking - offices, student dormitory, retail, rowhouses, etc.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 01:53 PM   #332
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To Mr Downtown and ardecila, first of all sorry about the maybe a bit "harsh" tone of my messages on this thread, wrote that coming back from a party and a bit drunk ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Downtown View Post
I'm not sure what argument you are making, or what type of housing you think should be permitted. Natural lighting is certainly not the only consideration, and in a northern continental climate (cold short winter days/hot long summer days), natural lighting is actually fairly unimportant. Residents will be away during winter daylight hours, and must shade summer daylight. Heating is important, so you want to keep interior hallways short. Elevators are required, must be in heated areas, and must be grouped together for redundancy. Many American flats are more than 100 square meters. Luxury apartments in new highrises are often 150 square meters, and towers may have only two to six units per floor.
To me natural lighting is still very important, and in any climate, how about the week ends ? Working from home ? Would you say the same about a detached house ? Or a row house ?
Also about shade in the summer, the sun is also much higher in summer, so typically the above balcony or "floor advance" (not sure about the term), can typically provides the shade, leaving the way for the lower winter sun to provide the heat (special glass can also be used), basic rule for a green building is most windows at the South (it is the west or east sun and windows that are major problems in summer)

Otherwise it's clear that the "double loaded corridor access type" allows to minimize the number of vertical communications cores (basically one per building), and also leads to having a "grand entrance"/lobby in a slab style building, like for a tower. But if you consider a 7 storey appartments building with at least 2 big traversing flats per landing, the "classic multry entry type" requires one elevator shaft (with one or two) for at least 14 units or 2100 square meters (22 600 sqft), which doesn't necessarilly seem ridiculous or "too much" (knowing that for 7 storeys an elevator failure is not dramatic like it could be for all elevators in a 20 or 30 storeys building).

In the end it is of course an opinion, and it is true that somehow I "hate" double loaded corridors building types (for housing, ok for hotels for instance of course), so on my scale of "luxury", the double orientation traversing flat feature is indeed much higher than the "central lobby with concierge" feature for instance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
You seem to be using several terms interchangeably... although I'm glad you provided a diagram.

You also seem to working under the assumption that renters/condo buyers care about natural ventilation and sunlight orientation - in other words, you're thinking like an architecture student. These are important concerns in a building, but keep in mind that other factors - ego, views, parking considerations, et al. - influence the shape of a building more than energy efficiency and optimal density. Plus, as Mr. Downtown has mentioned, local building and zoning codes limit the possibilities.

For example, we were talking a few months ago about a certain tight site in Chicago's South Loop. It could fit large, luxury-sized units in an "outside corridor" configuration, or it could fit smaller studio apartments in a "central corridor" configuration. However, in order to meet the demands of buyers for parking, it needs to have a parking podium - and the site is too narrow to create an efficient parking garage that provides enough spaces and proper auto-circulation routes. Hence, there is little interest in this parcel from real-estate developers. I assume it will be filled in later with some usage that requires less parking - offices, student dormitory, retail, rowhouses, etc.

About the terms, the right one for what is labeled "corridor slab" on the diagram seems to be "double loaded central corridor building" , so I will stick to this one. About talking as an architecture student, in fact I talk more as a potential resident, being indeed quite interested in architecture. I've lived in both and to me double orientation is indeed very important, as well as the building taking the sun orientation as a key parameter. About the example you mention I think where ever you can fit an "outside corridor" configuration, you can also fit a "classic multry entry type" (even if you access the multiple shafts in the ground floor), the outside corridor being somehow the "cheap way" of achieving double orientations flats in a slab, compared to "classic multry entry". Regarding optimizing density, the "double loaded corridor" type wins here, as it is typically thicker than a traversing flat slabs but does not really take more room in terms of shadows.

But anyway wouldn't want to divert this thread too much, but do you know about mid rise condos buildings being built these days around Chicago on a "classic multy entry" or "external walkway" type, or are they indeed all (or very high majority) of the "double loaded central corridor" kind ?

Last edited by Time69; July 1st, 2008 at 03:22 PM.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 07:45 PM   #333
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All new multifamily buildings in the Chicago area are double-loaded corridor type. Except for the now-demolished public housing buildings, I have never seen a building anywhere in North America of more than three stories with an exterior walkway. In Chicago, the problems of winter cold, blowing spring rain, and ice and snow removal would make such walkways both impractical and unattractive to residents. Exterior walkway buildings are sometimes used for two- and three-story suburban apartment complexes, but this is much more common in California, Florida, or Texas than in the Chicago area.

Theoretical considerations of cross-ventilation and natural lighting are of virtually no importance to potential purchasers of these suburban condominiums. Many if not most of the residents are older people: empty-nester couples or pensioner widows. Nicely decorated lobbies and hallways, pleasant views, new kitchen appliances and countertops mean much more to them.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 09:07 PM   #334
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At least around me, many suburban apartment buildings are filled with Eastern European immigrants...

Time69 does raise some interesting points, though... is the building type labeled as "multi-entry slab" illegal today? I can't imagine the costs of providing a couple of extra stairs and elevators would change the economics of many middle and upper-class developments, but it would allow for a lot of interesting architectural possibilities.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 09:30 PM   #335
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Don't know if anyone has mentioned this, but 1st Street St. Charles is having a huge rehab.

St. Charles already has a very vibrant downtown for Chicagoland standards.

Here is the link
http://www.firststreet-stcharles.com/the_community.html
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Old July 1st, 2008, 11:24 PM   #336
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I would venture that the Eastern European immigrants live in existing two-story complexes, not in the new seven-story condo buildings being developed near the train stations.

Certainly there are lots of multientry apartment complexes still being built, but they are only two stories high and only have stairs. Once you have to provide elevators, it makes no sense to spread the elevators out instead of placing them where they can provide redundancy to each other.
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Old July 2nd, 2008, 12:28 PM   #337
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Quote:
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All new multifamily buildings in the Chicago area are double-loaded corridor type. Except for the now-demolished public housing buildings, I have never seen a building anywhere in North America of more than three stories with an exterior walkway. In Chicago, the problems of winter cold, blowing spring rain, and ice and snow removal would make such walkways both impractical and unattractive to residents. Exterior walkway buildings are sometimes used for two- and three-story suburban apartment complexes, but this is much more common in California, Florida, or Texas than in the Chicago area.
Yes I'm aware of the typical exterior walkway buildings in California, (often with the walkway in the interior of an elongated courtyard, small pool in the middle). Exterior walkway buildings are also not very common in France, but there are quite a few in the south, in Britanny also I think. But overall in Europe there are a lot of them, for instance in Ireland it is kind of the standard schema, a lot of them in Norway too, also Germany.
Otherwise in Europe less and less "double loaded corridor" buildings are being built these days I think.
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Old July 12th, 2008, 01:23 AM   #338
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Quote:
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=217226

Elburn OK's plan for 3,100-unit development near Metra station

Elburn is moving ahead with approving the proposed housing development around the Metra station after what appeared to be a stall.

The Elburn village board approved a concept plan for the 682-acre, mixed use development earlier this month. The project by Geneva-based Shodeen Inc. includes about 3,100 residential units, including apartments, duplexes and single-family homes, north and south of the Metra station, many within walking distance. The station is south of Route 38 and east of Route 47 on Railroad Avenue.

The project had appeared to be stalled after members of the plan commission made several objections at an April 1 meeting.

David Patzelt, president of Shodeen Inc., said he was "disappointed" after the April 1 meeting, but he expressed optimism about the board's approval of the concept plan.

"In my opinion, this means the village is interested in working as a team with Shodeen," Patzelt said. "That team is interested in providing housing in a wide variety of sizes, shapes and price points, and allowing a wide range of the demographic population to live within Elburn. It will be a very diverse population."

Patzelt says this is a "critical time" for a project that is wrapped around a transportation hub.

"People are looking for other modes of transportation with the rising cost of fuel and oil," he said. "The train is green."

Patzelt said the entire project could take 10 to 15 years to complete, but work could begin as early as next spring.

"Approving the concept plan is a first step," Elburn Community Development Director Erin Willrett said. "It's a progression, one of many steps it will take to approve this large project. The next step is working on a preliminary plan. There are myriad of details to be worked out, including street layouts, building and house types, fees and parks, to name a few."

Patzelt said Shodeen expects to return to the village with a preliminary plan within 60 to 90 days. The preliminary plan will include more information on schools, wastewater treatment and public services for the village.

A crucial part of the plan calls for the extension of Anderson Road south from Route 38 across the railroad tracks to Keslinger Road. Another phase of the plan calls for commercial development around Route 38.

wow, this is big time for Elburn. I wish some of the inner core burbs would think so progressive.
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Old July 12th, 2008, 01:48 AM   #339
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Wow. Didn't they just extend Metra to them within the last few years? Good to see that it may be extensively used. I remember when Elburn had a celebration for their first traffic signal (Within the last 10 years).
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Old July 12th, 2008, 02:06 AM   #340
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wow, this is big time for Elburn. I wish some of the inner core burbs would think so progressive.

Elburn has one thing that the inner ring suburbs don't have... 682 free acres...
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