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Old August 5th, 2006, 09:13 PM   #121
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http://chicagobusiness.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?id=21636

New office complex on tap in Rosemont

Duke Realty is planning a roughly $100-million office complex on the site of a former Minute Maid warehouse along the Tri-State Tollway at 9800 W. Balmoral, says Steve Schnur, a senior vice-president at the Indianapolis-based REIT. [Thomas A. Corfman]
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:59 PM   #122
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Another big house

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...calchicago-hed

Highland Park estate of convicted insurer may go to developer

By Gerry Doyle

Tribune staff reporter
Published August 6, 2006

The historic Highland Park home of former insurance executive Michael Segal, now serving time for looting his company's trust fund, could be sold to a developer of luxury homes this fall.

Segal forfeited the property as part of his 2004 conviction, and the federal government now has control.

Unless another bidder can come up with $17.6 million or more at an auction in September, the U.S. Marshals Service will sell the home to Orren Pickell of Lincolnshire, according to court papers filed July 28.

The property, covering 17 acres and overlooking Lake Michigan, includes a formal garden designed by landscaper Jens Jensen, a greenhouse, a pool and 500 feet of private beach. The house itself features seven bedrooms and seven bathrooms.

That kind of luxury is worth about $22 million, according to Segal's attorney, and should not be auctioned off at a cut rate.

"The property is worth more than the $17.6 million offered by Orren Pickell," attorney Marc Martin wrote in an objection to the sale filed Thursday. "It would be economically unreasonable to sell the property for $4.4 million less than the listing price."

When Segal was convicted in 2004, he was ordered to forfeit $30 million in property, part of which will come from the sale of his home.

Preservationists worried at the time that the federal government would not protect the house, constructed in the 1920s, and would allow it to be destroyed for the sake of newer developments.

But Highland Park Councilman Jim Kirsch said the city had enacted a law this year that allowed it to designate any property as "historic," even against its owner's wishes.

The designation would put any development of such property on hold and require plans to conform to the city's standards for historic preservation.


"We know that the government has been marketing the property," Kirsch said.

"And we have worked aggressively to make sure that our Historical Commission and our zoning laws would be adhered to. Obviously for the community we would like to preserve the open space."

The city has not seen any "concrete" plans from any potential purchaser, Kirsch added.

"I would personally rather not have it developed at all," Kirsch said. "Legally, it's a different issue."

According to court documents, if any offer tops $17.6 million, Orren Pickell will receive a "breakup fee" of 33 percent of the amount by which the new bid exceeds Pickell's.

Martin also objected to that procedure, which he said was more appropriate for a bankruptcy case. The U.S. Marshals Service, which is handling the sale, said it expects "competing bids may emerge," according to documents.
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Old August 9th, 2006, 05:48 AM   #123
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A new tallest for Elgin-

16 storys, 195 ft, 147 units

http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/c...LAN_S10808.htm

By Nathaniel Zimmer
staff writer

ELGIN — A major downtown development sailed through the planning commission Monday night, as members voted 5-1 to approve a 16-story brick and glass condominium building proposed for the site of the old Gail Borden Public Library at the southwest corner of Kimball Street and North Grove Avenue.

Roughly 195 feet tall at its highest point, the 147-unit building would be the tallest in Elgin, eclipsing the Tower Building, built in 1929, by about 10 feet.

The project, dubbed Water Street Place, would include 21,500 square feet of ground-floor retail space, eight three-story townhomes, space for four freestanding restaurants and 399 parking spaces, 160 of which would be public. The namesake street would run through the center of the 3½-acre site, connecting Kimball to Grove and separating the condos from the restaurant spaces along the river.

Approximate prices would be $277,000 for a 950-square-foot one-bedroom; $300,000 for a 1,125-square-foot two-bedroom; and $330,000 for a 1,360-square-foot three-bedroom. Three-bedroom townhomes would be around $440,000.



Height concerns


Commissioner Bennie Sowers cast the lone no vote. She said the building was too tall and expressed doubts about the need for the townhomes, which front the condo building on Grove.
Despite his yes vote, Commissioner Robert J. Siljestrom said he had reservations about the height and the townhomes.

He called the project "pivotal" and said that "what we do here will undoubtedly set the pace" for the rest of the downtown, where two other major condominium and townhome projects are under construction and more are expected in the years ahead.

The proposal still needs to be approved by the city council.

Since the council selected developers Ryan Companies US Inc. and RSC & Associates Inc. some 15 months ago from among a number of other applicants interested in building on the city-owned property, there have been some changes to the proposal.

The parking originally was going to be underground, and the building was to top out at 10 stories. Water-table issues reportedly forced the developers to shift most of the parking aboveground, to inside the condo building, thus increasing the height.

Also expected to increase is the amount of financial assistance the developers would receive from the city. The developers estimated last year that they would seek $7 million in incentives, but without naming a number, officials have recently said the final figure will be higher.

Although the number of condos and townhomes has stayed about the same, there are now 70 fewer parking spaces than originally proposed.

Construction is expected to take about 22 months.

08/08/06
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Old August 9th, 2006, 06:42 AM   #124
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^Good news. I think a couple pages back I had images of the old 10 story proposal which was actually quite nice as well.
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Old August 11th, 2006, 06:00 PM   #125
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seems like elgin is hot

`Urban village' concept hailed for field in west Elgin

By Amanda Marrazzo
Special to the Tribune
Published August 11, 2006


Elgin City Council members were excited but cautious this week about a proposal to transform a 575-acre cornfield in the city's booming far west area into an "urban village."

Developers, who have an agreement to buy Yenerich Farm (between U.S. Highway 20, Plank Road, Russell Road and the future Corron Road extension) on Wednesday presented plans that include single-family homes, town homes and apartments.


At the center of the proposal is a 95-acre "urban center village" that includes "modest" retail and office space, said Michael Levin, president of development for Urban Retail Properties Co. of Chicago.

"This is going to be a place where a 9-year-old can safely go to the store to buy milk," Levin said.

The next step for developers will be meeting with city officials to address annexation and zoning issues.

"These are the kind of plans we have been looking for [in the far west area]," Councilman John Walters said. "This is the anti-sprawl."

Although council members praised the plan, there were traffic concerns. Councilman Dave Kaptain was concerned about residents from nearby neighborhoods being able to safely ride bikes or walk to stores and shops in the center.

Planner and landscape architect Chris Lannert, owner of the Lannert Group, said traffic studies would be conducted and project leaders will meet with Kane County officials next week.

"This is an exciting concept," Mayor Ed Schock said. "But if we goof this up it will have an impact on all the other developments.

The development is expected to take at least 10 years to complete, officials said. The property is in Burlington-based Unit School District 301.



Copyright © 2006, Chicago Tribune

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...alnearwest-hed
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Old August 30th, 2006, 12:42 AM   #126
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Port Clinton Place
Vernon Hills
Two 8 floor buildings + rowhomes

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Old September 2nd, 2006, 01:05 AM   #127
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http://www.dailyherald.com/search/se....asp?id=223200

Roselle sees hope for new downtown

By Kat Zeman

Daily Herald Staff Writer
Posted Friday, September 01, 2006

Though it’s not evident yet, Roselle’s downtown will be seeing some action soon.

A new residential and retail development, an outdoor market and a rejuvenated old Main Street block are in the works.

Construction of the 62-unit condo development with first-floor retail space at Park and Main streets is nearly finished. Park Street Crossing, developed by Chicago-based Norwood Builders, could be ready for occupancy by December.

Retail vendors could come in by January or February, said Pat Watkins, Roselle’s director of community development.

And, during the second week of September, Main Street will undergo road and utility improvements between Park and Howard streets. It should be complete by Thanksgiving.

“I think it’s progressing beautifully,” Roselle Mayor Gayle Smolinski said.

Besides the Norwood development, downtown has a European-style market in its future.

So far, organizers have more than 20 interested vendors who want to sell flowers, produce, specialty cheeses, fresh breads, coffee, pastries, gourmet foods and gift items. Plans also call for live musical entertainment during shopping hours and various special events.

The market’s grand opening is set for Sept. 16 at the parking lot on the west side of Prospect Avenue at Main. It will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday until Oct. 28. Plans call for resuming it next May.

Another much-anticipated project for Roselle is improving the old Main Street block between Prospect and Park. Roselle trustees are to discuss the issue Tuesday, with Burke Engineering expected to present the board with plans.

Smolinski said she envisions improvements to sidewalks and some type of surface area that can be used for gatherings, fairs and live performances.

“That’s sort of the last piece of the puzzle for our down-town,” she said.

But most people are still wondering what’s happening with Roselle’s Town Center. Construction on the new downtown center, located along Main between Prospect and Roselle Road, was completed two years ago. But what village officials envisioned as a catalyst for a downtown economic revival — studded with retailers and restaurants — has so far only produced an ice cream parlor, children’s arts center and two offices.

Main Street is lined with new storefronts ready for occupancy, but the developer has had trouble attracting tenants.

Developer Richard Gammonley said he could have already had the spaces filled but is trying to please the village by only accepting certain types of retailers.

“There’s interest,” he said. “But we’re trying to uphold a very specific village list of what they’d like to see.”

But he’s close to signing one of two tenants that plan to operate a breakfast and lunch restaurant at Town Center, he said.

However, the upscale restaurant, long ago slated for the corner of Roselle Road and Main, has not yet materialized. Various potential tenants have pulled out. Gammonley said many of them would rather open up closer to Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg.

“It’s tough,” Gammonley said. “We’re competing against a monster in Schaumburg.”
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Old September 8th, 2006, 01:08 AM   #128
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...-newslocal-hed

A downtown rises
St. Charles launches ambitious project to redevelop riverfront area

By James Kimberly

Tribune staff writer
Published September 7, 2006

With its stunning views of the Fox River and successful restaurants and nightclubs filling quaint brick storefronts that date to the 1850s, St. Charles' downtown is the envy of many communities.

But now the former mill town wants more--a vibrant blend of old and new. It hopes to get it with a more than $105 million, six-year redevelopment project designed to bring people and stores to four blocks of downtown riverfront. When completed, the area will boast nearly 200,000 square feet of offices, stores and restaurants, 80 condominiums and 16 apartments, as well as parking for an additional 933 cars.

"I really believe this is one decision that will redefine St. Charles for the next 100 years," Mayor Don DeWitte said Wednesday.

St. Charles is just one of many suburbs hoping to lure shoppers back to downtowns that have been abandoned for outlying strip malls and shopping centers. Although efforts at revitalization are under way in neighboring West Chicago as well as in Elgin, Aurora, and Glen Ellyn, few towns are going as far as St. Charles.

On 1st Street, site of a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday night, community leaders are hoping to create a lively commercial shopping district, as Illinois Highway 64 used to be.

"We are picking up our Main Street and turning it perpendicular on 1st Street, and we are going to create a pedestrian-friendly environment," DeWitte said.

Construction will begin Oct. 1 on $3 million worth of water, sewer and electric infrastructure.

The new buildings will complement the historic architecture in the area, as will a riverfront walkway and public plazas. The city hopes to create a place where people can walk and window-shop in a tranquil, scenic environment.

"A city needs a center. It needs an identity," said David Lencioni, 59, owner of The Blue Goose grocery, a mainstay in downtown St. Charles since 1928.

Lencioni has long advocated for a city-led initiative to re-invigorate the downtown.

"Something is finally going to be done. It's been kind of a dream for some of us," Lencioni said. "It's going to be some kind of blend between urban and suburban. I don't know what you would call it. The downtown is going to be the place where things happen again."

Naperville invested for years in its downtown shopping district, and it's reaping the benefits with national retail chains and branch locations of well-known Chicago restaurants.

In Aurora, private developers intend to spend more than $200 million to build 1,400 condominiums and 250,000 square feet of office and retail space downtown, said Carie Anne Ergo, a city spokeswoman. Aurora also is investing $50 million in storm and sanitary sewers to encourage more development downtown, Ergo said.

West Chicago has been acquiring lots along Main Street between Illinois Highway 59 and Washington Street as part of a long-term strategy for a downtown redevelopment[/B], said Joanne Kalchbrenner, community development director.

Rather than take them through condemnation, the properties are being bought as owners put them on the market. The city hopes to acquire enough land to sustain a downtown redevelopment project, Kalchbrenner said, even though it would not be as sweeping as St. Charles'.

"We don't have that kind of money, unfortunately," she said.

In St. Charles, STC Development LLC is paying about $70 million of the $105 million-plus redevelopment price tag. The city is contributing $35 million for land acquisition and public improvements, and it intends to pay with the increased property taxes that come from the development.

There are many similarities between the St. Charles project and one in Geneva more than 20 years ago, said Chris Aiston, Geneva's economic development director. Today, Geneva enjoys a popular shopping district on 3rd Street, Aiston said.

While the St. Charles redevelopment may create more competition for local shoppers, it probably will benefit the region, Aiston said.

"I applaud St. Charles. It's an ambitious plan. I hope it is a success, quite frankly," Aiston said.
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Old September 24th, 2006, 11:15 PM   #129
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I mentioned Citygate Center in Naperville a while ago. Construction is well underway already on some phases.

http://www.citygatecentre.com/
They have a nice video tour and one of the best live webcams I've seen.

CityGate Centre will offer:
* Approximately 1 million square feet of Class A office space
* 150,000 square feet of high-end retail, fine dining and fast casual restaurants
* A boutique hotel, spa, and fitness center, as well as a performing arts center
* Heavily landscaped and walkable town center environment


Office:



Retail:


Hotel (~14 floors):


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Old September 25th, 2006, 02:04 AM   #130
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Well, this would be very cool, if it wasn't being built out of a cornfield. I guess you can't have everything, though, and these semi-new-urbanist developments are much better than everything else going up out there.

For example, if they found a site on the edge of Naperville's existing street grid, and integrated it, it would be much better. But, this is most welcome anyway.
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Old September 25th, 2006, 02:27 AM   #131
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I honestly apologize for sounding like a broken record here, but why would developers not come down and build something like that on 35th and State instead of a cornfield? Bring it on!
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Old September 25th, 2006, 03:25 AM   #132
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The projects going up in suburban Chicago look pretty good. A lot of the newspaper article keep referring to cities redeveloping their downtown which is real awesome. I'm not from the area so I'm assuming that the Metra rail is near most of these downtowns??? right???. I see on the Metra rail map that most of the cities in the suburbs are served by rail which is good, but most of the lines particularly in the western suburbs go only on an east-west route. So maybe a light rail line could serve that area to pickup some of the north-south slack. Oh, and all that exurban development should be controlled a little more.
Also, there was an article about a indoor water park, well by the looks of things even with Lake Michigan nearby, yall are having some water issues.


http://www.growingsensibly.org/news/...?objectID=2045

Last edited by urbanaturalist; September 25th, 2006 at 03:45 AM.
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Old September 25th, 2006, 03:43 AM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician
I honestly apologize for sounding like a broken record here, but why would developers not come down and build something like that on 35th and State instead of a cornfield? Bring it on!
Probably because this is a project by Calamos, which has its HQ next to this plot of land.
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Old September 25th, 2006, 04:45 AM   #134
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CityGate makes me cringe. It does not support TOD. Although it is a decent hike from the route 59 train station, it is just going to cause more congestion on the horrendous Route 59. Plus, with office buildings sitting empty on the East-West corridor, this seems to be like robbing Peter to save Paul. I suppose for Naperville, this could be an improvement over the typical Urban Sprawl. Hopefully the city/IDOT will push some infrastructure to improve the traffic congestion on Route 59 or come up with a second bypass route.
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Old September 25th, 2006, 05:04 AM   #135
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My second food for thought is the article about the Lake Michigan water supply.

http://www.growingsensibly.org/news...p?objectID=2045

What bothers me is that cities like Naperville already had municipal systems in place for their water supply before they started to buy water from the City of Chicago (throguh the DuPage Water Commission). I agree with the article about "restocking" the lake. If the Dupage Water Commission will take water in from Lake Michigan, they should also pay to pump their treated sanitary water back into the lake (i'm being a bit fecicious here). The hundred of million of gallons every day that is pumped to DuPage County ends up probably in the DuPage River on its way to the Gulf of Mexico. While many believe that reversing the Chicago River was an incredible engineering feat, I personally believe it was detrimental to the condition of the lake. The river is slowly draining the water out of the lake. With the Clean Water Act being enforced (finally) and the TARP, the water going into the lake is now clean(er). I could go on with all night with my opinions of the condition of Lake Michigan and point fingers at such places as Milwaukee and even some of the users of the water of other Great Lakes, but that is not this thread.... I just wanted to open some eyes.
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Old September 29th, 2006, 12:46 AM   #136
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http://www.dailyherald.com/search/se....asp?id=232495

Elgin gives big OK
Water Street Place developers to get $10.8 million from city

By Christine Byers

Daily Herald Staff Writer
Posted Thursday, September 28, 2006

At least five of Elgin’s City Council members are expecting their phones to start ringing and e-mail boxes to start filling once you read this story.

Some of you will raise eyebrows when you learn they agreed to give $10.8 million to developers to build Water Street Place — a residential, retail and dining destination on the site of the former Gail Borden Library. And others may be amazed at the quality of the city’s premier up-and-coming downtown project, said Councilman Juan Figueroa.

And most of you will wonder how else the money could have been used, Elgin Mayor Ed Schock said.

“The problem is, if there is no development, there is no money,” Schock said. “And the only way to get money from this property is to move ahead with the development.”

The project falls within a special taxing district, which will allow the city to collect any increase in property taxes during the next 20 years and use the money to spur development within its boundaries. Meanwhile, other taxing bodies, such as the school district, do not benefit from the increased value until the policy expires.

Schock reminded his fellow council members that the city’s largest incentive package was the donation of land and subsequent purchase of stock in the Elgin Watch Factory.

Councilman Tom Sandor said Elgin wouldn’t exist had it not been for incentives offered to early settlers to come here.

“I hate incentives, or as you guys call them, ‘entitlements,’” Sandor said, as he looked at the developers proposing the $66 million project. “But incentives are a reality. I am a skeptic by nature, but I see the 21st century of Elgin in this project. It brings an urban lifestyle we’ve never seen before.”

Council members Brenda Rodgers and David Kaptain opposed the agreement.

“At a time we thought requests for incentives would go down, you are asking us for the largest incentive package this council has ever seen,” Kaptain said. “Are you telling me this project couldn’t be successful without it?”

Rodgers questioned how RSC & Associates and Ryan Companies could be so confident that the condos would sell in a slowing housing market and asked if they would offer reduced prices if the trend continues.

Prices for one-bedroom condos would start slightly below $200,000 and rise to $327,000 for three-bedroom units while the eight proposed townhouses would sell for $536,000, said Rich Curto, principal of RSC & Associates.

He said slowing sales in housing markets hit home builders that develop subdivisions in rural areas first and do not affect urban projects like Water Street Place the same way because they appeal to a niche market looking for an urban lifestyle.

Kaptain asked how Curto expected to get so much for the townhouses Kaptain called “caves with porches.”

A traffic engineer tried unsuccessfully to appease Kaptain’s concerns about parking, saying the city’s parking garage for The Centre and city hall would suffice in addition to the 160-plus spaces being proposed in the project.

Kaptain argued that if the project was built just across Kimball Street, the development would have to provide twice as much parking.

Schock argued that when Elgin’s downtown was in its heyday as a retail Mecca, none of the stores had parking and yet business thrived.

Kaptain quipped that’s because people rode buses and bikes back then.

“I can’t support this project because I can’t believe it will be successful,” Kaptain said.

Just before the vote Kaptain added, “I hope they prove me wrong.”

The project includes a 16-story tower building, which will have 146 condos, eight townhouses, 237 private parking spaces and about 18,400 square feet of retail space at the street level of the building.

Four restaurants will front the river, and a new street called Water Street, with about 72 street-level public parking spaces, will be built to run through the development.


Another 90 spaces, owned by the city, will be inside the condo building.
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Old September 29th, 2006, 02:42 AM   #137
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^ Is it near transit? That's all that matters to me, otherwise it's just vertical sprawl and an article that's not worth my time reading
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Old September 29th, 2006, 04:39 AM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician
^ Is it near transit? That's all that matters to me, otherwise it's just vertical sprawl and an article that's not worth my time reading
It looked like it was about half a mile from the train station downtown Elgin. Sounds like a decent project... too bad it "requires" TIF funds though. And I too have a hard time believing they will sell the units for the price they are marketing.

TUP-That is a little harsh of you to say - and selfish. Not everyone hear thinks that only TOD is good... in fact the website is founded on the common interest in skyscrapers... is something that this development is offering in downtown Elgin (if you can call 16-stories a skyscraper).
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Old September 29th, 2006, 06:32 AM   #139
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrintersRowBoiler
TUP-That is a little harsh of you to say - and selfish. Not everyone hear thinks that only TOD is good... in fact the website is founded on the common interest in skyscrapers... is something that this development is offering in downtown Elgin (if you can call 16-stories a skyscraper).
^ Well I see no use in density that's not near transit, and I have no problem making that abundantly clear. As long as there are no personal insults involved, I don't see the issue.
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Old October 1st, 2006, 07:30 AM   #140
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Many random updates to projects mentioned earlier.

Northwest Community Hospital expansion- Arlington Heights


The Stratford of Palatine
Palatine
5 floors


The two Harp Group hotels in Des Plaines. One looks to be 11-12 floors


Best image I could find of Water Street Place after the increase in height:


Savanna Grand
Fox Lake
12 floors
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