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Old October 1st, 2006, 07:43 PM   #141
spyguy
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Woodstock Station
Woodstock
4 floors + brownstones

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Old October 6th, 2006, 01:07 AM   #142
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It looks like John Buck's proposal in Oak Brook includes a condo highrise (~15 stories) as well as retail and another aLoft hotel. However, it doesn't look very urban, but what does look urban in Oak Brook?
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Old October 6th, 2006, 01:08 AM   #143
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-Edit-

Stupid SSC slowing down

Last edited by spyguy; October 6th, 2006 at 04:41 AM.
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Old October 7th, 2006, 04:53 AM   #144
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^Nice find Spyguy. Woodstock is a great town with that beautiful square. These townhomes are right near the Metra too.
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Old October 9th, 2006, 05:27 AM   #145
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^ I like the developments in Woodstock and Palatine in particular.

Is Woodstock the town in which Groundhog Day was filmed? Somebody did a picture thread of that town once, and I found it to be very charming
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Old October 9th, 2006, 05:52 AM   #146
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A small image of that Oak Brook condo proposal
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Old October 9th, 2006, 07:12 AM   #147
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Yes, Groundhog Day was filmed there. It's very nice architecturally, but it seems too sleepy to have Metra service. It's slowly changing, of course; and how many sleepy towns have an Opera House?
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Old October 14th, 2006, 12:37 AM   #148
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http://www.globest.com/news/758_758/.../149775-1.html

Senior Housing Rises in $19M Restoration
By Marita Thomas


A joint venture between Chicago-based Senior Lifestyle Corp. and United Neighborhood Organization has broken ground for Senior Suites of Joliet, an $18.7-million restoration and conversion of the now-vacant historic YMCA building at the corner of Ottawa and Webster streets. It will contain 90 residential rental units, five of which will be market rate.

Senior Suites is Senior Lifestyle’s model for affordable housing. It has developed, and owns and manages 15 such properties in Chicago, and this will be its first in the suburbs. It will contain 90 residential rental units for seniors. Of those, 16 are studio layouts ranging from 415 sf to 585 sf that will rent for between $396 and $690 a month. The other 74 units are one-bedrooms, ranging from 520 sf to 1,068 sf at rental rates of between $424 and $810 a month.

The five one-bedroom units that rent for $810 a month are market rate, Robert Gawronski, Senior Lifestyle’s VP of development and acquisition, tells GlobeSt.com. “All of the other 85 units are set aside for seniors with annual household incomes at or below 60% of the area median income.” The median for a single-person household is $31,680 a year, while it is $36,180 a year for two-person households.

The facility will also contain more than 5,500 sf of common-area amenities, including a dining room, library with two restored fireplaces, exercise capacity and free laundry. Housekeeping, scheduled transportation, meal service and planned activities are included in the rent.

The building was designed by D.H. Burnham & Co. in 1927 and was recently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The YMCA vacated it nearly 20 years ago, and since then “it operated sporadically as a transient hotel,” Gawronski says. His company acquired it for just north of $1 million.

“The cost of converting an existing building that calls for historic preservation is significantly--about $3 million--more than new construction,” he says, “because you’re not only working with an existing structure, which is like fitting a square peg into a round hole, but it also requires that you restore 90-year-old windows and still meet today’s energy requirements. In addition, it’s tricky to fit living spaces into a former gymnasium.” To preserve existing space, this will have about 31 different unit layouts.

Yet, the historic register listing makes the project eligible for historic preservation tax credits, which join low-income housing tax credits in this instance. They don’t cover all of the premium costs, Gawronski says, but they do make it feasible. His company will raise $12 million in equity from the sale of the tax credits. Additional funding comes from several small grants, a $1.6-million first mortgage from Harris Bank, and a secondary low-rate loan from the Illinois Housing Development Authority through the City of Joliet.

“Tax credits are a wonderful way of getting developers to invest in affordable housing projects that would not otherwise be feasible,” he says. Senior Living is a prolific developer/owner of market-rate senior housing, which entered the affordable arena about 20 years ago. It has previously participated with UNO, Chicagoland’s largest Hispanic community-based nonprofit. UNO is providing community support and some sweat equity for this project.

“This building is especially significant,” Gawronski says, “because Downtown Joliet has many historic buildings and it is in the process of a major revitalization. Residential has been the missing component in an area that now includes theater, restaurants, shops and a new baseball stadium and casino.”

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Old October 24th, 2006, 12:41 AM   #149
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Santa's Village is to be auctioned off.
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Old October 25th, 2006, 03:01 AM   #150
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I'm assuming this is a giant TOD

http://www.globest.com/news/767_767/.../150077-1.html
Last updated: October 24, 2006 07:43am
Lemont Breaks Ground on $250M Downtown Project
By Robert Carr Email this story | Printer-friendly | Reprints


LEMONT, IL-Ground has broken for a $250-million mixed-use development that will become Lemont’s new Downtown, along the historic Illinois & Michigan canal. The development, which will include retail, residential and office buildings, will be a public/private partnership between the village and Chicago-based Marquette Cos.

“Our vision is to catalyze economic development in Downtown Lemont while preserving its historic structures, heritage and character,” says Bruno Bottarelli, managing director of the company. “Lemont’s new Downtown will be a place where people live, work, shop and play. Across the country, there’s a growing demand for a walkable urban lifestyle, even in the suburbs.”

The development will be built using TIF district money and form-base code, a zoning ordinance that governs the form and appearance of buildings instead of individual, specific uses. By definition, form-based code governs the form (look, mass and scale) of structures instead of their use. The code bases zoning on keeping properties a similar style. Rather than designating real estate for specific uses, property development is governed by controlling the quality of public space such as streets, pedestrian ways, parks and plazas, established by buildings and structures fit to proper scale and form.
For Lemont, buildings must have first-floor retail space, parking must be located behind buildings, and storefronts must come up to the sidewalk without interruption by parking lots, Bottarelli says. “These guidelines help ensure the most comfortable environment for shoppers and pedestrians. Also, certain materials that reinforce the local vernacular must be incorporated into the construction, such as Lemont yellow limestone and brick, to preserve the town’s character,” he says.

The new development will also go along a “Canal Walk,” using the waterfront as a draw for shoppers. The canal was to have connected shipping between Illinois and Michigan in the 1830s, but railroads became a more popular means of transiting goods, and the costly canal project was closed. However, suburban residential development in the area boomed during the latter half of the 20th century, and subdivisions grew. The village now wants to build a local retail center.

“Lemont is losing consumer spending and tax revenue to retail centers in Oak Brook, Naperville and Orland Park. A village center in Lemont will serve as a local option for the 218,000 households within a 10-mile radius, and will help Lemont capture a larger share of the annual retail spending among area residents that currently is siphoned off to surrounding suburban communities,” Bottarelli says.

The Lemont Downtown Redevelopment District will consist of three pedestrian-friendly sections, each with a distinct identity: the Historic District, Transit Depot District and Fry’s Landing District. Marquette has begun development on Fry’s Landing District. The first of four phases in the district is called the Front Street Lofts. It has four buildings with 82 studio, one-, two- or three-bedroom loft residences, 24,000 sf of retail space and a 260-car parking structure. Homes are base-priced from the $180,000s to the upper $400,000s, with first move-ins expected fall 2007.

Future phases of the Lemont Downtown Redevelopment District will include an arts-based community center, as well as a linear public park and the Canal Walk, featuring a replica 1800s barge that will serve as a museum/restaurant venue and landscaped walking and bicycle paths. Other developers will join Marquette in building these phases. Bottarelli says the project should be completed within 10-15 years.

The development team includes Chicago-based architects Sullivan, Goulette & Wilson; planners Dover, Kohl & Partners; the Chicago office of engineers URS Corp.; and Clarkston, MI-based retail planners and urban designers J Eppink Partners Inc. Waukegan-IL-based Pickus Construction is the construction manager and general contractor for the Front Street Lofts.
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Old October 25th, 2006, 03:24 AM   #151
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^Looks pretty nice by the picture attached to the article

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Old October 25th, 2006, 08:43 AM   #152
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Lemont's downtown is already very nice - this looks like it will add a lot of vitality. I hope they re-design the train station, though, it looks horrible now.
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Old October 25th, 2006, 04:56 PM   #153
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dead canal project.

INteresting that a dead canal is the center of new development, i wonder where the water drains from into it.

That boat is interesting too, since it cant fit under the bridge and probably isnt designed to go anywhere.
I wonder if its a real boat and if so is it permanently anchored there?
Is it movable?

This is a very forward thinking development, but a little far for me to visit,
though i would like to see it some day.
I just find the southern suburbs are so far from anything im near or would have cause to go to.
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Old October 26th, 2006, 01:16 AM   #154
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14-story mixed-use building planned in Waukegan
Wednesday October 25 2006

Daniel Duggan


Negotiations are ongoing between Beitler Real Estate Corp. and the city of Waukegan for a 14-story mixed-use building downtown.

The project is another step for Waukegan in its efforts to recast the aging industrial image of the city in exchange for a modern urban feel.

Beitler won an approval from the City Council last week, beating out The Orion Group. The Beitler proposal includes fewer condos, more retail and zero assistance through the TIF district; compared to The Orion Group, which requested $8.1 million in tax assistance, according to city documents.

Sharyl Rothschild, Beitler managing director of investment services, says the Waukegan site showed a lot of promise for future development.

“We feel the demographics will definitely support a mixed-use project like this,” she says.

The proposal includes approximately 220 condos, 48 townhouses and 35,700 square feet of retail. Gross square footage would be 625,000 to 780,000 for the $100 to $125 million building.

The project is among dozens of residential developments planned for the aging city to the north of Chicago. In the coming years, city planners are expecting thousands of residential units, a resurgence of retail growth and new jobs to fill office buildings.

The entertainment portion of Waukegan’s redevelopment is anchored by the $23 million renovation of the Genesee Theater in 2004.

Another $17 million was invested in a new City Hall and parking garage.

Residential and business development will follow a Skidmore, Owings & Merrill master plan, which was adopted by the City Council in 2003.

At buildout in 20 years, the 1,400-acre lakefront area will hold 3,700 residential units — while leaving half the area for open space.

Rothschild says the future planning helped make the city appealing for their project.

“They’re making huge improvements in the city with the 20-year plan.”
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Old October 30th, 2006, 04:44 AM   #155
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I'm actually really excited to see how much midrise is going up in the burbs, there must be dozens and dozens of buildings that are 5-7 floors plus. A few nice 15+ buildings as well. It's gonna be more and more fun to fly into/out of Chicago and see the new buildings popping up all around.
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Old October 31st, 2006, 02:19 AM   #156
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Wow, I am impressed with all of the positive developments going on in many of the suburbs. It is great to see many of the downtown areas being developed or revitalized. There is hope for the suburbs afterall.
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Old November 17th, 2006, 12:37 AM   #157
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http://www.dailyherald.com/search/se....asp?id=250267

Study: condos needed, not parking

By Joseph Ryan

Daily Herald Staff Writer
Posted Wednesday, November 15, 2006

Suburbs can rake in new tax dollars while providing housing near Metra stations by ripping up parking lots for parking garages and condos, a report released Tuesday by a transit advocacy groups says.

The Chicago-based Center for Neighborhood Technology singles out Hanover Park and some southern suburbs in the report as potential sites for more downtown-type development near Metra stations.

The report says the new developments would bring in more property tax dollars as well as sales tax revenue from the construction of commercial and residential property while potentially reducing suburban-dependence on cars for work commutes. In particular, Hanover Park could realize an additional $600,000 in property taxes by replacing its 12 acres of parking lots with such development, the report says.

Metra station developments have been all the rage in the suburbs in recent years. But some towns are still lagging, said center researcher Albert Benedict.

“There are some that are ready for it and some that aren’t,” Benedict said. “But in many cases there is still enormous opportunity for development.”

Benedict said the center is not advocating a net reduction in Metra parking as dozens of suburbs are clamoring for federal and state funds to build more lots.

“Creative strategies can be used to still create enough spaces,” he says, referring to parking garages, new lots on Metra right-of-way space and street parking.

Hanover Park Village Manager Marc Hummel said he wasn’t sure of the research center’s methodology in determining tax revenue. Yet he noted the village has a plan for development near the station that a sluggish real estate market may be slowing. The parking lot, he said, is central to the plan.

“Big picture-wise, we are embracing transit-oriented development,” he said. “We have a very effective commuter parking location.”

Aside from plans on the drawing board, Hanover Park has approved a 24-acre development near the station featuring 126 townhouses.

The research center holds up Arlington Heights, which has been developing its downtown for years, as a good example for other suburbs to follow.

“We see there is a lot of evidence of this happening,” Benedict said. “But there is still opportunity for more density and a more higher efficiency.”

---------
Full report
***PDF Warning***

http://www.cnt.org/repository/PavedOver-Final.pdf
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Old November 17th, 2006, 01:00 AM   #158
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The Brownstones of Arlington
Arlington Heights
2.5 stories

I thought this one was significant, since it in person seems much more "prewar" than any other recent attempt at traditional rowhouses that I've seen. It's only a couple blocks from the Arlington Park station.


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Old November 17th, 2006, 09:54 AM   #159
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^ Wow, nice.
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Old November 22nd, 2006, 04:36 PM   #160
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...-newslocal-hed

In growing Naperville, it's public vs. parking
Garage is approved; neighbors fight on
Advertisement


By James Kimberly
Tribune staff reporter

November 22, 2006

With its mix of expensive restaurants, nightclubs and national retailers, Naperville has a downtown that is as popular as any in the suburbs.

Perhaps too popular, some residents believe.

As the city proceeds with plans to build another downtown parking garage, many who live near the proposed location--a lot at the Nichols Library--are determined to stop it.

At the second protest march this month, a vocal group of about 20, mainly teens, trudged Tuesday night from Naperville North High School at Mill Street and Ogden Avenue to City Hall where they hoped to address the City Council.

Carrying signs reading "Deck the Deck" and "Save the Lot, Save Our Kids," they were greeted by another sign that indicated that Mayor George Pradel would not take public comments at the meeting.

"It's an outrage," said Christopher Devane, a protest organizer. "He won't even let the kids speak." He said he planned to file a complaint with city officials.

The project is likely to collapse because of its cost and incompatibility with the downtown, Devane said, and other residents agreed.

"I don't think this parking deck is a good idea," said Diane Pedersen, who lives about 2 miles from downtown. "It's not our face."

The protests are a rare display of dissatisfaction from a community that takes pride in its contentedness and an indication that while many people celebrate the transformation of Naperville's downtown, many who live close by are growing weary of the changes.

"It's developed into a classic confrontation between the people and expansion," said Roger McDonald, who has lived on Petterson Court near Naperville's downtown since 1969.

There is plenty of evidence, both analytic and anecdotal, that Naperville needs more parking downtown. Of the 3,400 spaces available in garages, lots and on streets, nearly 1,000 are private and 90 percent of the spaces available to the public are full during the lunch hour and evenings.

Because the spaces are spread throughout the downtown rather than concentrated in one place, 90 percent capacity can seem more like 100 percent for a motorist looking for a place to park, said Marcie Schatz, director of the transportation, engineering and development department. Customer satisfaction with parking has declined every year for the four years that the city has surveyed on the topic, Schatz said.

The city needs to build 750 to 850 parking spaces in the next five years just to keep pace with downtown development, Schatz said.

One way to accomplish that is to replace the 130-space lot at the Nichols Library with a $13.5 million, 348-space, four-level parking garage with one level below ground.

The city would pay for the garage from the cultural fund, an assessment on the downtown business district, and a 1 percent increase in the food and beverage tax on downtown bars and restaurants. The food and beverage tax increase requires approval by the Illinois General Assembly.

Patti Roberts, executive director of the Downtown Naperville Alliance, said adequate parking is crucial to businesses. And downtown Naperville is crucial to the community, Roberts said.

"When people come to look to see if they want to move to Naperville, the first place a Realtor drives them is downtown: `Look at our cool downtown,'" Roberts said.

The city approved the garage Oct. 17, and Schatz said plans are proceeding to bid the project next spring and break ground on the work next fall.

But that has not stopped protesters.

They complain that the garage will be an eyesore and draw traffic near Naper Elementary School.

They also are concerned about providing additional parking for a downtown they are growing less and less comfortable with.

"I have a number of concerns about the downtown area," said Susan McNeal-Bulak, who has lived for 23 years at Jefferson and Eagle Avenues, across the street from the proposed garage.

"What I've increasingly become concerned within this past year is the number of restaurants and bars down there and that's what I think led to this parking garage," McNeal-Bulak said. "It becomes less appealing for a resident. There would be less of a reason for me to walk downtown if it becomes a giant food court."

McDonald said he recently visited downtown Naperville with his adult children on a Friday night and was stunned by what he experienced.

"It was a melee down there," he said. "I couldn't believe it. It was really something, like being in downtown New Orleans or something."

Christopher Devane, who lives on Center Street about a mile from the proposed garage, also opposes the garage, believing it will be unsightly and an intrusion of the business district into a neighborhood of homes.

"It is insulting that downtown Naperville is being handed over to bars and restaurants," Devane said. "I think this is the last stand. It's clear the business district ends at Webster Street. There's a line drawn in the sand at Webster Street. The [Downtown Naperville Alliance] is clearly out of its jurisdiction."

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