daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > City/Metro Compilations

City/Metro Compilations Help report active highrise/urban developments occurring in your city to the global SSC community.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 8th, 2011, 05:38 PM   #1281
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Speech by CE at the Hong Kong Institute of Architects 55th Anniversary Conference
Saturday, November 5, 2011

Following is the speech delivered by the Chief Executive, Mr Donald Tsang, at the Hong Kong Institute of Architects 55th Anniversary Conference held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre today (November 5):

Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen, Dominic,

I am very delighted to join you all this morning.

First of all, congratulations to the Hong Kong Institute of Architects (HKIA) on your 55th Anniversary and on staging this very meaningful conference.

Also, a very warm welcome to all our visitors. I hope you enjoy your stay with us in Hong Kong.

The theme of this conference, "Megalopolis and Architecture” is farsighted and inspirational. Indeed, we have come to expect nothing less from our architect community over the years to be farsighted and inspirational.

Since the first trains started running along the Kowloon-Canton Railway more than 100 years ago, Hong Kong has been on the fast track towards becoming a major city and a modern-day metropolis.

To become a successful megalopolis, we will have to use all our vision and experience to link up more closely and more effectively with nearby cities throughout the Pearl River Delta which we in Hong Kong call the PRD.

United Nations-Habitat has estimated the population of the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong-Macao-Zhuhai area, which comprises only part of the PRD at around 150 million residents. That makes it the largest mega-region by population in size. It is bigger than similarly connected regions in Japan, or Brazil.

Our region is a relatively wealthy one with a dynamic manufacturing base. It is also quickly transforming into a global hot-bed for ideas, innovation and creativity.

Our architects have helped to create Hong Kong as one of the best connected cities anywhere. Boulevards, waterfront promenade, pedestrian bridges, roads, railways stations and more all contribute to our city's reputation as a great place to live and work.

Our famous cityscape is a testament to the architectural know-how that has evolved here. The vision of our architects has helped build a city that is greater than the sum of all its parts. This is a key to Hong Kong's ability to compete alongside far larger and more established places.

All-in-all, it is a case of "so far, so good". But the theme of this conference indicates that even bigger challenges lie in wait for our architects, as well as engineers, city planners and governments.

As the PRD continues to converge and evolve as a dynamic megalopolis, the Central Government of China has clearly stated its ambition to establish our region as one of the most competitive in the world by 2020.

Achieving this goal will depend on how successfully we can collaborate with our neighbours. We must design a region that capitalises on the unique strengths of different cites within it. I am not just referring to economic strengths, but also cultural, creative and artistic strengths.

Last year, we signed the Framework Agreement on Hong Kong-Guangdong Co-operation. Among other things, this provides a more effective platform to collaborate on city planning.

In addition, the National 12th Five Year Plan pledges to support deeper cross-boundary co-operation and strengthen planning and co-ordination. It also supports an improved transportation system within the PRD region.

In other words, there is a clear commitment from all sides to work together in making sure that our megalopolis evolves in a swift and co-ordinated fashion.

Hong Kong architects have a great deal of expertise and experience to contribute to the vision of establishing a successful and efficient mega-region. The same qualities of connectivity and efficiency that have been at the heart of our city's development should be promoted throughout the PRD region.

One of our most pressing challenges is cross-boundary connectivity.

On average more than half a million people cross six land boundary crossing points between Hong Kong and the Mainland every day. Tens of thousands more travel to and fro by air and sea. During festival seasons, the number is likely to be doubled.

Among the Ten Major Infrastructure Projects that I set out in my Policy Address in 2007, at the beginning of our current term, four deal with cross-boundary challenges.

They are the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge, the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link, Hong Kong-Shenzhen Western Express Line and Hong Kong-Shenzhen Joint Development of the Lok Ma Chau Loop.

In addition, we are forging ahead with the planning and development of the Liantang/Heung Yuen Wai Boundary Control Point.

These projects will help us to sustain the long term development of our region by facilitating economic and social integration and development within the PRD.

Ladies and gentlemen, there are indeed many exciting challenges ahead for our architects in Hong Kong and around the region. We should also remember that great architecture not only has to look great, it also to be great for the environment, great for the end-users, great for business and great for our cultural heritage.

At the same time, the rise of the megalopolis requires a fresh and radically new perspective in promoting co-operation beyond geographical, legal and conceptual boundaries.

Governments in the region will also have to play their part by collaborating more closely and remaining open-minded to the ideas of others.

I congratulate the HKIA on staging this conference which brings together the key stakeholders in the development of our region.

I would also like to thank the HKIA and its members for their contributions to our city's extraordinary development over the past 55 years.

I wish you all a very enjoyable and fruitful conference.

Thank you.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 9th, 2011, 02:25 AM   #1282
wjfox
Futurist
 
wjfox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: L O N D O N
Posts: 38,334
Likes (Received): 13282

I spent the last couple of days working on this animation. It shows the future expansion of Hong Kong's MTR -

http://www.futuretimeline.net/21stce...ong-mtr-future

__________________
FutureTimeline.net...
wjfox no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2011, 07:57 AM   #1283
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Idea of office in Chai Wan appeals
The Standard
Thursday, November 10, 2011

More than 70 percent of space in Chai Wan E-Trade Plaza has been sold, says Henderson Land (0012).

The developer has released 26 office units and 32 parking spaces since October 17.

With the vacancy rate in Central at a tight 4 percent, "we are seeing a lot of demand from large corporations to find extra office space in some other parts of Hong Kong Island," said Thomas Lam Tat-man, general manager of Henderson's sales department.

Data center spaces from the sixth to the 10th floors at the 26-storey Chai Wan complex have sold out at an average price of HK$6,625 per square foot.

According to Centaline Property, a duplex unit of 13,656 square feet on the top two floors of the building went for HK$115 million, or HK$8,421psf. The buyer was a company that wanted the space for itself.

So far, the Chai Wan project - which is due for completion in October next year - has generated HK$490 million in sales. Henderson Land intends to put more units on the market in the near future, though prices will be increased by 5 percent.

Each of the building's floor offers 7,700 sq ft.

Project Website : http://www.etradeplaza.com.hk/index_e.html
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2011, 04:52 PM   #1284
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

LCQ17: Repair and maintenance of drainage pipes
Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Government Press Release

Following is a question by Dr Hon Priscilla Leung Mei-fun and a written reply by the Secretary for Development, Mrs Carrie Lam, in the Legislative Council today (November 9):

Question:

It has been reported that an accident occurred some time ago at Nelson Street of Mongkok, in which drain cleaner was suspected to have been splashed off the pipes on the external walls of a building, causing injuries to passers-by. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) as the "Minor Works Control System" which has been implemented since the end of 2010 regulates a total of 118 items of minor works, including the "erection, repair, alteration, addition and removal" of drains in residential buildings, as well as requires members of the public to employ "prescribed building professionals" or "prescribed registered contractors" to carry out the relevant works and submit to the authorities a certificate of completion of works, record plans and other relevant documents within 14 days of the completion of such works, how many certificates of completion of works and plans the authorities have received so far; whether any quality problem was found in individual works; whether the authorities have formulated monitoring measures to prevent flat owners from privately employing unauthorised persons to carry out the works; if they have, how many cases of non-compliance have been uncovered so far;

(b) as plumbing works in buildings are not included in the "Household Minor Works Validation Scheme", whether the authorities have carried out inspections or tests regularly on plumbing works in old buildings completed before the "Minor Works Control System" came into effect to ensure that the pipes are in good condition; if they have, of the progress of such inspection work; if not, the reasons for that;

(c) for old residential buildings with no owners' corporation, no owners' committee and no management company (which are commonly referred to as the "three NOs"), whether the authorities will consider providing emergency subsidies to their owners for carrying out tests and maintenance on the pipes on the external walls of their buildings, in order to prevent accidents caused by ageing pipes; if not, of the reasons for that; and

(d) whether the authorities had received in the past three years any complaint about serious leakage or seepage from pipes on the external walls of buildings; if they had, of the number of such complaints; the general procedure for handling complaints received by the authorities and the number of government departments involved; and what approach the authorities have adopted at present to handle cases in which the flat owners of the buildings concerned are unwilling to repair the leaking pipes for a long time?

Reply:

President,

Drainage pipes are integral parts of a building and have direct bearing upon building safety and hygiene issues. Pipes without proper and timely maintenance may give rise to seepage or leakage. If the drainage pipe is located on the exterior of a building, it may affect passers-by or even cause health nuisances or safety concerns. As such, to strengthen the regulation of works involving drainage pipes, the Government has designated general drainage works as minor works for regulation under the Minor Works Control System, so as to achieve the purpose of ensuring works quality. Moreover, the Buildings Department (BD) will take enforcement actions under the Buildings Ordinance (Cap 123) against drainage pipes in defective or insanitary conditions, and require the owners concerned to take appropriate follow-up actions.

My reply to the four-part question is as follows:

(a) By the end of October this year, the BD had handled around 4,800 certificates of completion, relevant record plans and documents concerning minor works. Among them, about 1,433 involved drainage works. To ensure their compliance with the requirements of the Buildings Ordinance, the BD will conduct random audit checks on these minor works after their completion. As at end October this year, the BD had conducted audit checks for 615 minor works, and none has been found to have building safety and hygiene problems due to poor works quality. As regards cases with owners employing non-prescribed building professionals and/or non-prescribed registered contractors to carry out minor works, the BD will investigate and take appropriate follow-up actions on any reported cases. As at end October this year, the BD had uncovered a total of 36 non-compliance cases concerning owners employing unqualified persons to carry out minor works (involving minor works of various kinds). BD has issued removal orders in those cases and is considering taking prosecution action against the parties involved.

(b) It is the owners' primary responsibility to inspect, repair and maintain their buildings to ensure that they are in a safe condition. As the regulatory authority, the BD has launched many large scale operations for inspecting dilapidated buildings. In addition to external walls and common areas, external drainage pipes of buildings are also covered in the inspections. If defects or dilapidation are found in the drainage pipes during the inspections, the BD will order the owners to take appropriate follow-up actions.

The BD's large-scale operations include the Co-ordinated Maintenance of Buildings Scheme (the Scheme) launched in collaboration with other relevant Government departments in November 2000. During the ten years between 2000 and 2009 when the Scheme was implemented, more than 1,300 target buildings were identified for inspection, and assistance was provided to the owners in arranging repair works. To enhance building safety in Hong Kong, the BD launched a new large scale operation in April this year to inspect the conditions of 500 buildings each year and issue statutory investigation or repair orders where necessary. Preparation for the operation has been completed and the BD has started inspecting the target buildings.

Apart from the above large scale operations, the Mandatory Building Inspection Scheme scheduled for implementation next year will also require owners of target buildings to regularly inspect and repair their buildings, including drainage pipes in the common areas or on the external walls.

(c) To assist owners in need in carrying out building maintenance and repair works, the BD, the Hong Kong Housing Society (HKHS) and the Urban Renewal Authority (URA) have launched a number of financial and technical assistance schemes, including the Comprehensive Building Safety Improvement Loan Scheme, the Building Maintenance Grant Scheme for Elderly Owners, and the Integrated Building Maintenance Assistance Scheme. Owners of buildings who have not formed owners' corporations (OCs) or other owners' organisations, and have not hired any property management companies, can also apply under the schemes in respect of building repair works (including external drainage pipe works). Furthermore, for buildings without OCs or owners' organisations, the HKHS and URA will encourage and help their owners to set up OCs or to organise common area repair works in accordance with the provisions of the deed of mutual covenant of the building. The HKHS and URA will also provide technical support and advice on issues related to works and tendering, etc.

(d) Generally speaking, complaints about defective or leaking drainage pipes on the external walls of private buildings are handled by the BD. Upon receipt of such complaints or referrals from other departments, the BD will carry out inspections. If it is found that the drainage pipes concerned are defective or are posing seepage and hygiene problems as a result of damage, the BD will invoke its power under section 28 of the Buildings Ordinance and issue a drainage repair order to the owners concerned, requiring them to carry out the necessary repairs within a specified period. In emergency cases, such as extensive seepage or serious hygiene problems caused by severely damaged drainage pipes, the BD will immediately arrange for emergency repairs by a Government contractor and then recover the cost from the owners.

Upon receipt of a drainage repair order, the owner should appoint a qualified professional to investigate the damaged drainage pipes and carry out the necessary repairs within the specified period. If the owner fails to carry out the works as specified in the order within the specified period, the BD will consider taking further enforcement actions, including instigating prosecution against the owner, and appointing a Government contractor to carry out the necessary repairs, the cost of which plus a supervision charge will be recovered from the owner after completion of works.

Over the past three years (i.e. from January 1, 2009 to September 30, 2011), the BD received a total of 18 050 complaints about defective or leaking drainage pipes in private buildings. The relevant information is tabulated below:

Year Number of Complaints
---- --------------------
2009 6 178
2010 6 630
2011 5 242
(as at September 30)
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 16th, 2011, 08:38 AM   #1285
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

The missing link
The Standard
Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Public space within Stanley Plaza is said to have been taken over by giant real estate investment trust The Link for renting to commercial interests.

The plaza, which has been under renovation, is due to start reopening on Friday.

Applications by The Link to carry out alterations and new building work are usually processed by an independent committee of the Housing Department.

But when the department rejected an application to renovate Stanley Plaza in 2007 as it would have exceeded the floor area allowed for the work in prospect, the process was switched to the Buildings Department.

That department then used a less stringent criteria to process the application - such as not calculating areas below the staircases - sources told Sing Tao Daily, sister newspaper of The Standard.

They said there was no reason why two different criteria should have been used to process the application.

"It means the Housing Department has suffered a loss," one source claimed of the deal which saw it handing the renovation work to The Link.

But a Housing Department spokesman said the renovation work will be given the all clear as long as it meets the requirements of the Buildings Ordinance.

The spokesman also said that, when all the work is finished, The Link must notify the director of buildings or the independent committee and officers will then check if alterations met requirements.

And if changes are approved, he added, a problem of illegal construction work will not exist.

The spokesman also noted that, according to listing documents, The Link can boost the value of its assets through renovation.

Apart from observing the Buildings Ordinance and other rules, it must also satisfy land lease terms.

A spokesman for The Link claimed that the commercial floor area of Stanley Plaza - some 14,770 square meters - will not have increased after the renovation.

In fact, he added, that space is actually less than specified in the land lease, which allows for an area of 14,998 square meters.

But the spokesman did admit that through "better utilization of the floor area" there will be 7,000 additional square meters of internal floor area.

Still, he added, as the total commercial floor space is unchanged, this boosting of the internal area simply makes better use of resources and is a widely adopted practice.

The spokesman also said the new exterior design makes the outside of the plaza more attractive.

But lawmaker Lee Wing-tat thinks that authorities need to explain what principles were used in handling the application process in the renovation project.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 16th, 2011, 08:58 AM   #1286
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

LCQ11: Kwong Wah Hospital redevelopment project
Wednesday, November 16, 2011
Government Press Release

Following is a question by the Hon James To and a written reply by the Secretary for Food and Health, Dr York Chow, in the Legislative Council today (November 16):

Question:

The Tung Wah Group of Hospitals has been striving for the redevelopment of the Kwong Wah Hospital (KWH) and signed a Memorandum of Understanding for the redevelopment project with the Hospital Authority (HA) in 2009, but the redevelopment project has yet to commence. The Chief Executive has also not mentioned the redevelopment of the hospital in his 2011-2012 Policy Address. As far as I know, KWH is in urgent need of redevelopment, and also requires regular building safety inspections and maintenance (including annual inspection and engagement of overseas consultants to carry out a comprehensive structural inspection every five years to ensure building safety). In reply to a Member's question earlier, the Government said that in the redevelopment of hospitals, it would take into account "the future population growth and ageing in the region, the demand for healthcare services, the overall provision of healthcare services in the various clusters under HA, as well as the development of public and private healthcare services". As KWH cannot be redeveloped in the near future and the population of Kowloon West continues to grow, will the Government inform this Council whether it knows:

(a) the respective amounts of expenses (by year) incurred by KWH in the past five year on the engagement of consultants and maintenance for the two types of building inspections (annual inspection and five-yearly comprehensive structural inspection); whether any major structural safety problem has been identified; if so, of the details; the estimated amount of expense on the comprehensive structural inspection to be conducted next year;

(b) given that I have learnt that KWH has invited tenders for services of a consultant relating to the preliminary work of the redevelopment project (including traffic and heritage assessments), the current progress of the preliminary work and when it is expected to be completed;

(c) given that when briefing this Council on the proposed redevelopment of Caritas Medical Centre (CMC) in 2007, the Government indicated that as CMC had been in use for more than 40 years, its facilities were inadequate and outdated, and the population in the region was ageing, it was in urgent need of redevelopment, and as KWH is facing similar problems, whether the Government has made any relevant assessment of KWH (including the current utilisation rates and waiting times for various services and the impact of a growing elderly population in the region on the demand for medical services);

(d) given that the Government indicated in its reply to my earlier inquiry that the facilities of KWH had failed to adequately meet the modern operation needs and the increasing demand of the community for medical services, when the Government expects to seek funds from this Council to kick off the redevelopment of KWH; whether the Government has assessed the redevelopment costs; if so, of the amount involved; what measures it will adopt prior to the completion of the KWH redevelopment project to compensate for the current inadequate services in KWH; and

(e) what measures the Government will put in place to improve the overall hospital services in Kowloon West, apart from the soon-to-be-completed redevelopment project of CMC and the plan to develop the Centre of Excellence in Paediatrics in Kai Tak Development Area?


Reply:

President,

(a) Kwong Wah Hospital (KWH) would conduct annual review on the conditions of the hospital structure and facilities every year and carry out various minor maintenance and improvements works based on the review results. Currently, the annual expenditure on minor maintenance works for the 41 public hospitals under Hospital Authority (HA) is about $310 million, of which about $18 million is for works in respect of KWH. Besides, KWH would commission a professional architectural consultancy firm through open tender to conduct a comprehensive inspection every four to five years. When the last comprehensive inspection was completed in late 2008, the report generally indicated that there was no structural problem. The next major structural check will commence next year. The expenditure incurred by such check can only be confirmed after the tendering exercise has been completed.

(b) The Traffic Impact Assessment and the Heritage Impact Assessment conducted for the KWH redevelopment project are underway and will be completed in early 2012. Other preliminary work including preparation of the Schedule of Accommodation and the Functional Brief has also commenced and is expected to be completed within 2012.

(c) Given that most of the buildings of KWH are over 50 years old, HA has earlier submitted a proposal on the KWH redevelopment project to the Government for consideration. It has also conducted various preliminary preparatory work, including preparation of the "Project Definition Statement", "Clinical Service Plan", "Master Development Plan" and "Technical Feasibility Statement", etc. In the planning process, the Administration has taken into consideration a number of factors, such as the projected demand for healthcare services having regard to population growth and demographic changes in the district, the utilisation and estimated growth rate of services of individual specialties, and the possible changes in healthcare services utilisation pattern, etc.

In 2010-11, the bed occupancy rate in KWH was 71%, and the median waiting time for first appointment at its specialist out-patient clinics was 10 weeks. HA will regularly monitor the utilisation rate and trend of demand for various healthcare services and ensure that the services can meet public demand through continued restructuring of service delivery mode of hospitals, hospital development projects and implementation of other suitable measures.

(d) The Government will process the funding application for redevelopment of KWH in accordance with the established procedures to facilitate an early commencement of the project. According to the preliminary estimate, the entire redevelopment project will cost over $8 billion. We will make a more detailed estimate before seeking funding approval. KWH will maintain a series of maintenance and repair measures before implementation of the redevelopment project. It will also make service adjustments having regard to the utilisation of and demand for its services, so as to ensure that it can provide safe and appropriate healthcare services to the patients.

(e) To meet the increasing service needs and shorten the waiting time in the West Kowloon district, HA will strengthen its inpatient and integrated care services, including providing additional Haemodialysis places for renal patients, and extending the service hours of emergent coronary artery catheterisation surgery, etc. Furthermore, to enhance service quality, HA will optimise the thoracic, rheumatic, ophthalmic and prenatal care services and implement a series of integrated care service programmes, such as the integrated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management programme, the integrated care services for elderly patients and the integrated mental health programme, etc.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 20th, 2011, 04:15 PM   #1287
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Shoreline stabilisation works at Butterfly Beach in Tuen Mun
Friday, November 18, 2011
Government Press Release

The Government proposes to construct an approximately 13-metre-wide and 90-metre-long rock revetment at the eastern end of Butterfly Beach, Tuen Mun, to protect beach facilities. About 2,890 square metres of foreshore and seabed will be affected.

The work is scheduled to commence in February 2012 and to be completed by September in the same year.

The extent of the area affected is described in a notice published in the Government Gazette today (November 18).

The notice together with its related plan are posted on notice boards near the site.

The plan can be seen and purchased on order at the Survey and Mapping Office of the Lands Department, 23/F, North Point Government Offices, 333 Java Road, North Point. It can also be seen at Tuen Mun District Office and on the Lands Department's website (www.landsd.gov.hk) under Government Notices.

Any person who considers that he has an interest, right or easement in or over the foreshore and seabed involved may submit a written objection to the Director of Lands, 20/F, North Point Government Offices, 333 Java Road, North Point, on or before January 18, 2012.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2011, 08:33 AM   #1288
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Hutch fails to turn car slots into store
The Standard
Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Hutchison Whampoa has failed in its attempt to overturn a rezoning decision that blocked its plan to convert 78 public parking spaces at Cheung Kong Center into a supermarket.

In a written judgment yesterday, Court of First Instance judge Anselmo Francisco Trinidad Reyes dismissed a legal challenge by Hutchison subsidiary Turbo Top that the Town Planning Board exceeded its jurisdiction by imposing restrictions on a specific building.

Benjamin Yu, for Turbo Top, argued the board's power must be that of a "broad brush" and an attempt to regulate what can or cannot be done in a building through rezoning is an "unlawful extension" of its jurisdiction.

Turbo Top owns the site at the junction of Queen's Road and Garden Road, Central, where Cheung Kong Center stands.

In addition there is a public open space in front of the center, a car park with 1,046 spaces, of which 800 are public, a public garden and a 648 square- meter fast food outlet.

It acquired the site in November 1996 under a government agreement, which has a special condition that the company maintains a public car park of at least 800 spaces.

Judge Reyes ruled the board decision rezoning the Turbo Top site fell squarely within its functions.

He said the rezoning amendments could not be labeled the "micro- managing of a specific building."

"That there currently happens to be a single building or development in the area is only fortuitous."

There is also no ambiguity in the Town Planning Ordinance provisions, and so the board has not deprived Turbo Top of property rights.

Judge Reyes also dismissed the argument that the requirement of minimum parking spaces is unworkable.

The 800 spaces, as a public asset, should be preserved for the benefit of the area even though they may be currently underused.

The site formerly comprised the Hong Kong Hilton, Beaconsfield House government offices and the Garden Road car park, which also had 800 public spaces.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2011, 10:28 AM   #1289
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

LCQ1: Development of private hospitals
Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Government Press Release

Following is a question by the Hon Chan Kin-por and a reply by the Secretary for Food and Health, Dr York Chow, in the Legislative Council today (November 9):

Question:

In recent years, a lot of pregnant women and patients from the Mainland have sought medical treatment in private hospitals in Hong Kong, and bed spaces in private hospitals are in serious shortage and their services are close to full capacity; some middle-class people are intent upon using private medical services by taking out medical insurance, but it turns out that they also have to wait for bed spaces. Twelve of the 13 local private hospitals have been established in the name of non-profit-making organisations, and among them, 10 are charitable institutions which are exempted from tax under section 88 of the Inland Revenue Ordinance, and some of them have recently increased their medical service charges substantially by as much as 1.6 times. At present, there is no provision or penalty under the conditions of grant of land to private hospitals by the Government for regulating their operations or restricting them from making hefty profits, and the authorities expect that when there are new private hospitals coming into operation in 2017, the relevant provisions and penalties may be included in the conditions of land grant on a trial basis, and if proved feasible, they may consider amending the legislation to regulate the existing private hospitals as well. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) given that the annual profits for individual non-profit-making private hospitals are as high as $400 million and their fiscal reserves are up to a few billion dollars, how the authorities at present monitor the use of the funds of non-profit-making private hospitals (including whether their profits are used for the development of healthcare services, and whether they are inclined to invest their resources in services that can generate higher profits, thus compromising the quality and quantity of other services); furthermore, the Hospitals, Nursing Homes and Maternity Homes Registration Ordinance which regulates private hospitals in Hong Kong was enacted in 1936 and the last time when major amendments were being made was in 1966, and there is no provision in the Ordinance to regulate the fees and charges, profits as well as financial conditions of private hospitals; last year, the United States endorsed a health reform to strengthen monitoring of non-profit-making hospitals (including a compliance check once every three years) to ensure that their operation mode complies with the conditions for tax exemption status; whether the authorities have any plan to make reference to the practices in the United States to review the tax exemption status of the existing non-profit-making private hospitals, and levy profits tax and land premium based on their profitability;

(b) apart from inspecting every year whether those private hospitals operating on low-premium land grant offer low-charge beds according to the requirements of the conditions of land grant, how the authorities ensure that these hospitals do not set any threshold for such bed spaces (such as rejecting patients who undergo major operations or are covered by medical insurance), and that such bed spaces are fully utilised; whether the authorities have any plan to impose regulation as soon as possible by way of legislation, so as to improve the low occupancy rate of as low as one quarter of such low-charge beds at present; and

(c) given that a few private hospitals have initially planned to add about 250 bed spaces in 2013-2014, and the Government has allocated four sites for the development of private hospitals to provide more bed spaces (among which 70% will be reserved for Hong Kong residents), but the four new private hospitals are only expected to come into operation in 2017, in the six years from now until 2017, how the authorities ensure that Hong Kong residents in need of private hospital services may receive priority allocation of private hospital bed spaces; why the authorities do not immediately study regulating the existing private hospitals by introducing legislative amendments?

Reply:

President,

Private hospitals are an integral part of the healthcare system in Hong Kong. They provide primary healthcare services and a range of specialist and hospital services for members of the public who could afford and are willing to choose private services. Private hospitals are subject to regulation by the Department of Health (DH) under the Hospitals, Nursing Homes and Maternity Homes Registration Ordinance (Cap 165) (the Ordinance) on matters of accommodation, staffing or equipment. To ensure the provision of quality healthcare services to patients, DH has formulated a Code of Practice for Private Hospitals, Nursing Homes and Maternity Homes (COP) in which the standards of good practices are set out for adoption by private hospitals. In addition, DH conducts routine or unannounced hospital inspections from time to time to monitor the compliance of their operation with the Ordinance and the COP.

My reply to the three parts of the question is as follows:

(a) At present, there are 12 private hospitals registered in accordance with the Ordinance in Hong Kong. They are required to meet the conditions relating to accommodation, staffing or equipment under the Ordinance. There are no provisions in the Ordinance regulating the financial return or service scope of private hospitals. Private hospitals would decide on their own matters relating to the use of resources and development. According to information provided by private hospitals, three out of the 12 private hospitals expanded their services in 2011, providing in total about 50 additional beds for specialties of obstetric services, paediatrics, medicine and intensive care. Four other private hospitals expanded specialist services including oncology centres, renal dialysis treatment, cardiac catheterisation services and endoscopy services, etc.

Among these 12 existing private hospitals, 10 are charitable institutions which are exempt from tax under the Inland Revenue Ordinance (IRO). According to section 88 of the IRO, any charitable institution or trust of a public character shall be exempt from tax. Tax-exempt charitable bodies must be established solely for charitable purposes recognised by the law. As required by the Inland Revenue Department (IRD), charitable bodies applying for tax exemption must have a governing instrument which states their objects precisely and clearly. For charitable bodies granted tax exemption, their incomes (including profits derived from their business) and properties may only be used for attainment of their stated objects and any distribution of their incomes and properties amongst their members is strictly prohibited. IRD will review charitable bodies granted tax exemption periodically to see whether their objects are still of a charitable nature and whether their activities are compatible with their stated objects. When carrying out the review, IRD will usually ask the relevant charitable bodies to submit their account statements, annual reports, as well as other relevant documents and information so as to ascertain whether they have carried out any activities which are outside their charitable objects and deviate from any clauses contained in their governing instruments, and whether their business and profits derived therefrom meet the requirements stated under section 88. IRD will then decide whether their tax exemption status should continue or be revoked, and whether tax should be levied on the profits derived from their business operations.

(b) According to the COP, private hospitals are required to prepare respective schedules of charges for different categories of hospital beds, including any categories of beds stipulated in the Conditions of Grant of their land, for information and reference by the public. For provision of clinical services of any specialty, private hospitals are required to have the appropriate accommodation and equipment, and have qualified personnel and sufficient manpower to provide the services in compliance with the law. Hospitals are obliged to explain their admission policy and arrangements clearly to their patients.

(c) The Government's policy is to promote and facilitate the development of private hospitals on top of a strong public healthcare system acting as the healthcare safety net for all. Private hospital development could enhance the overall service capacity and service quality of our healthcare system to cope with increasing demand for healthcare services. It could also ease the imbalance between the public and private healthcare sectors. According to information provided by private hospitals, the majority of their users are holders of Hong Kong identity card based on means of registration when admitted into private hospitals.

The Government has reserved four sites at Wong Chuk Hang, Tseung Kwan O, Tai Po and Lantau respectively for the development of private hospitals. We are formulating the land disposal arrangements for the four sites. To ensure that the services provided by the new hospitals would be of good quality, the Government will formulate a set of special requirements for development of the sites, covering the scope of service such as the types of specialty; and the standard of service such as the number of beds, hospital accreditation and price transparency, etc. Requirement will also be imposed to limit the number of beds used for obstetrics services by the new hospitals. We plan to first dispose of the two sites at Wong Chuk Hang and Tai Po in the first quarter of 2012. The other two sites will be disposed of later in phases.

Apart from the four reserved sites, some private hospitals are also carrying out or planning expansion projects. Subject to compliance of these projects with the relevant statutory and other requirements (e.g. land use), the Government supports the expansion and redevelopment projects of existing private hospitals for enhancement of their services. We believe that the above private hospital development projects can further increase the service capacity of the private healthcare market as well as the overall healthcare service capacity of Hong Kong, providing more choices for people who could afford and are willing to pay for private healthcare services.

Thank you, President.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2011, 10:06 AM   #1290
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Short-term outlook cool for homes, retail
The Standard
Wednesday, November 23, 2011

New World Development (0017) managing director Henry Cheng Kar-shun expects an 8-10 percent drop in local home prices in the short term.

Cheng said yesterday that the correction would be reasonable amid a property market rendered sluggish by continued land supply and a flailing global economy.

His comments echo the Centa-City Leading Index, which shows prices fell 3 percent since July.

Secondary transactions, moreover, are as low as during the 2008 financial crisis.

Analysts warn that the downward price adjustment may last as long as two years.

However, New World is optimistic in the long term, and Cheng spoke of plans to put several residential projects on the market that will add up to 3,000 new units next year.

Meanwhile, the local retail market is expected to cool in the fourth quarter, despite the Christmas boost.

Sun Hung Kai Properties (0016) expects to post slower year-on-year growth in its shopping malls in the final quarter.

Its Sheung Shui mall Landmark North forecasts an 18 percent year-on-year rise in footfall during December 17 to 27, compared with a 20 percent jump last year. Christmas shopping is tipped to account for 45 percent of the total revenue earned by SHKP's eight malls next month.

New World fell 1.17 percent to HK$6.78 yesterday, while SHKP rose 0.9 percent to HK$95.25. GRACE CAO
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 24th, 2011, 03:45 AM   #1291
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Developers keep their smiles despite outlook
The Standard
Thursday, November 24, 2011

Developers are upbeat despite Financial Secretary John Tsang Chun-wah's forecast of a soft landing for the property market and hint that prices may fall further.

That was the outlook as Cheung Kong (Holdings) (0001) yesterday released a first batch of 65 flats at Festival City 3 in Tai Wai at an average price of HK$8,109 per square foot, and sales begin Saturday.

"The market is on an uptrend," said executive director Justin Chiu Kwok-hung. "The Hong Kong dollar is depreciating along with the US dollar. In a low interest rate environment, people would prefer to invest in something concrete, like property."

The first batch of flats may bring in around HK$600 million for Cheung Kong. It aims to sell 400 out of 1,536 flats - generating as much as HK$3 billion - before the end of the year.

Total property sales this year have brought in HK$30 billion for the developer.

Also on prospects, Henderson Land (0012) executive director Augustine Wong Ho-ming said the market may slow further, but he is cautiously optimistic.

Elsewhere in the sector, Sun Hung Kai Properties (0016) has put on the market 16 more flats at The Wings in Tseung Kwan O at an average HK$6,988 psf.

Meanwhile, in an effort to boost liquidity, banks are reported to have stopped offering mortgages that can only be drawn down next year. Market sources said this could ease liquidity pressure.

And banks have reportedly cut incentives to agencies.

HSBC (0005) is said to have shaved commissions from 0.3 percent to only 0.15 percent. A commission of 0.2 percent is offered to mortgage referrals of more than HK$200 million.

Citibank has also acted, cutting its HIBOR-based mortgage commission to 0.25 percent.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2011, 04:15 PM   #1292
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Falling short
The Standard
Thursday, November 24, 2011

Looking at notices on the windows of property agencies, 28-year-old accountant Lam, who is yearning to buy a flat for the first time, cannot help but wonder why prices are not falling enough.

"A year ago, I was anticipating that the Special Stamp Duty would hit property prices, perhaps dropping to a point near the level of the 2008 financial tsunami. I was hoping to buy my first flat," said Lam, who has a monthly income of HK$30,000.

But the reality is different. Twelve months after the Special Stamp Duty was introduced, property prices have gained about 2 percent from a year ago, according to Colliers International.

"The duty only prevented prices from shooting higher, but did nothing to lower prices. I still can't afford my own flat," Lam said.

The Special Stamp Duty was introduced by the government on November 19 last year.

It applies to homes bought and resold within 24 months. For flats resold within six months, the levy is 15 percent. A 10 percent levy applies to property sold between six and 12 months of purchase while a 5 percent duty is applicable for offloading within 12 to 24 months.

In its first year, just 55 transactions have fallen within the duty-payable bands, according to the Inland Revenue Department.

Total duty paid amounts to HK$1.7 million. Of these 55 properties, 28 had been resold within six months, and 27 between six and 12 months. That compares with 68,500 transactions in the first 10 months of the year.

"The SSD has dried up almost all the confirmor deals and short-term speculation. It imposes a significant extra cost on speculators, whether short-term or long-term," said Ricky Poon Wei-kei, residential sales executive director at Colliers International.

Last month only 15 confirmor deals were recorded, a low since July 1995, according to Centaline Property Agency. The number of such deals has fallen to under 100 a month for 10 consecutive months. "However, I don't see that the duty has helped cool down the market," Poon said.

"The fall in the number of transactions was rather the result of banks' mortgage rate hikes, as well as restrictions on the loan-to-value ratio by the Hong Kong Monetary Authority."

Lenders have gone through five rounds of mortgage rate increases this year.

Standard Chartered Bank (2888) may have started the sixth round when it recently adjusted mortgages to Hong Kong interbank offered rate plus 3 percent, which in real terms amounts to a 3.22 percent interest rate.

In December last year, StanChart's mortgage rate was at HIBOR plus 0.7 percent.

New guidelines for mortgage lenders were issued in June. The monetary authority set a 50 percent limit on mortgages for flats priced over HK$10 million.

For buyers of flats valued at between HK$7 million and HK$10 million, the mortgage was limited to 60 percent, with a maximum loan of HK$5 million.

In the secondary market, too, there are few choices for first-time buyers as sellers hold back.

Jackey Chow, a Ricacorp agent, said: "When they can't buy, they turn to the leasing market. They just do not understand that there is not a lot of flats on the market now."

According to Chow, about 10 percent of clients have rented flats on half-year contracts. "They normally have to pay around 20 percent more than for a normal two-year contract."

Lawrence Poon Wing-cheung, a specialist in real estate development at City University of Hong Kong, advises against buying.

"Look at the Hang Seng Index, it can fluctuate by 1,000 [points] a day. That will have an effect on the property market, too," the academic said.

"On the other hand, think about it, if you can find a cheap flat now, that means the seller too is not so optimistic.

"Why take the chance?"
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2011, 04:18 PM   #1293
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Green is way to go for biodiesel plant
The Standard
Wednesday, November 09, 2011

A Hong Kong-based company is investing US$164 million (HK$1.28 billion) to build a biodiesel plant to produce 100,000 tonnes of fuel each year.

"As a clean, alternative transport fuel made from waste, our biodiesel has the potential to make a valuable contribution to improving Hong Kong's environment," ASB Biodiesel chief executive Anthony Dixon said yesterday.

Dixon said emissions of greenhouse gases from biodiesel are 85 percent less than those of fossil diesel.

Widespread use of biofuel has sparked controversy, with opponents seeking to taint the diversion of crop supplies toward biofuel production as disastrous for food supply.

Dixon said the problem may be overcome by producing biofuel from waste.

He also said rising food prices will have little impact on production costs.

Noting that local demand for biodiesel currently stands at 70,000 tonnes a year, Dixon urged the government to provide more support for producers.

He said the fuel his firm produces will be distributed to local petrochemical and oil companies, as well as the international marketplace.

Construction of ASB Biodiesel's plant - located on an 18,000-square-meter site in Tseung Kwan O Industrial Estate - will be completed in December 2012, with production starting in 2013.

Greeners Action executive director Angus Ho Hong-wai said biodiesel use can reduce our dependence on fossil diesel, which generates large amounts of air pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide.

Ho suggested the government offer incentives, such as providing land, for producers to build their plants. There are currently three biodiesel production plants in the territory.

In order to promote the use of biodiesel locally, motor vehicle biodiesel is duty-free.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2011, 02:54 PM   #1294
melrocks50
See you on a dark night
 
melrocks50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bangkok
Posts: 2,441
Likes (Received): 1503

Quote:
Originally Posted by wjfox View Post
I spent the last couple of days working on this animation. It shows the future expansion of Hong Kong's MTR -

http://www.futuretimeline.net/21stce...ong-mtr-future

Very Nice!!
melrocks50 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2011, 11:18 AM   #1295
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Flames of revolt
The Standard
Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Hundreds of angry villagers yesterday burned a paper effigy of development chief Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor in protest at a government proposal to crack down on unauthorized structures.

The villagers - about 500 were at the protest - also chanted "die soon" and "you deserve to die."

Secretary for Security Ambrose Lee Siu-kwong urged villagers to respect the law and social harmony.

"We do not encourage burning [as part of a protest]," Lee said.

Asked if burning paper effigies constitutes criminal intimidation against an official, Lee said it depends on whether the person involved feels threatened.

The effigy - in the style of a paper doll used in funeral rituals and with Lam's name on it - was first beheaded before being placed in a paper coffin and torched.

Hundreds of government pamphlets on the arrangements for the removal of illegal structures were also burned outside the new Heung Yee Kuk building in Sha Tin.

Protesters claimed the Development Bureau published the leaflets without a full consultation with villagers.

The protest was held before an urgent meeting involving all 27 rural committees of the kuk, which represents indigenous villagers of the New Territories.

Kuk chairman and lawmaker Lau Wong-fat was also under fire with villagers asking whether he is too feeble in his dealings with the government on their behalf.

"I may be feeble, but I am not incompetent. A battle can be won by military force or by wisdom. I choose the latter," Lau told the meeting.

"We share the same goal. But I will consider whether I should stiffen my attitude."

The bureau earlier required villagers to declare any unauthorized structure on their homes. It will exempt or delay the removal of unauthorized structures built on or before June 28 this year, though most will eventually have to go.

Lau said he will press for the government to separate older hereditary houses from village houses and to respect New Territories' traditions. He also hopes the issue can be negotiated with the new administration next year.

Chief Secretary for Administration Stephen Lam Sui-lung appealed to villagers to be reasonable.

A spokesman for the Development Bureau said the existing situation in the rural areas and the views of the kuk have been taken into account.

"We fully appreciate their concerns but we also have responsibility to safeguard buildings and public safety and to act in accordance with the law," he said.

The bureau said the kuk shared most of the views of the government during a Liaison Committee meeting in June, apart from its view that village houses built on land held under the Block Government Lease - which does not impose restrictions on the height of buildings - should not be subject to enforcement actions.

The bureau said it will adopt "a more lenient approach" for issues of a less serious nature and which have lower potential risks by implementing an unauthorized building works reporting scheme and regular inspection to ensure the structural safety of the buildings.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 30th, 2011, 07:55 AM   #1296
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Developers face $5m fines
The Standard
Wednesday, November 30, 2011



Developers and property agencies that violate regulations on the sale of new flats may face up to HK$5 million in fines and up to seven years in prison under new proposals unveiled yesterday.

A draft bill will be introduced in the Legislative Council in the first quarter next year following a public consultation that began yesterday. Views will be sought until January 28.

"By setting up these regulations, we hope to increase the transparency of the property market. It is a must at any time, regardless of market conditions," said Eva Cheng Yu-wah, Secretary for Transport and Housing.

The proposed laws - covering the sale of all first-hand uncompleted and completed residential properties - will be enforced by a new authority under the housing branch of the Transport and Housing Bureau.

Under the proposals, developers must only state the unit price of flats based on saleable area only, and not mention the gross floor area, for which there is no standard definition in the industry.

They must also comply with specific font size requirements for sales brochures.

In addition, developers will not be allowed to reserve flats for potential buyers before releasing price lists.

To give potential buyers in general a clearer picture of prices, the government proposes that a minimum number of units be included in the first and subsequent price lists.

In a developments of up to 100 units, each price list must contain at least 30 flats. And in bigger projects, the prices of at least half of the total units must be listed in the first price list.

Developers must list the prices of at least 10 percent of units on each subsequent price list.

The proposed measures also require the developer to continue the existing practices, such as releasing brochures at least seven days before sales begin, and the price list three days in advance.

For first-hand uncompleted and completed residential properties sold on an en bloc basis - the whole project or whole building - requirements related to sales brochures, price lists and show flats can be waived since the buyers are not the public.

However, transaction information has to be made public. Developments under the new and old Home Ownership Scheme are exempt.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2011, 06:37 PM   #1297
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

NT protests trigger urban backlash
Updated: 2011-12-01 07:51
China Daily

Urban homeowners jumped into the fray as the conflict between New Territories villagers and the government rages on over the removal of illegal structures, which erupted into an effigy burning outburst this week.

About 10 representatives from a concern group representing homeowners in private buildings protested outside the Development Bureau's building in Central Wednesday morning.

The demonstrators expressed resentment at villagers' demands, and at their conduct in Monday's angry demonstration. Wednesday's protesters called the action by the villagers "extremely unreasonable".

"What they want is super privileges on top of the concessionary right for 'small houses'," said a member of the concern group, Andrew Wan Siu-kin.

He charged the villagers are becoming an ultra-privileged class in Hong Kong.

Wan said his group wants to "expose the truth" behind the villagers' claims that "small houses" are their traditional right and interest and they are merely protecting their homes.

The "small houses" have nothing to do with New Territories people's tradition, since the program was introduced only in 1972, through the Small House Policy, Wan said, adding it's just a "cushion" policy.

What's more, many "small houses" are not the homes of indigenous villagers, Wan said.

Some have already been sold as luxury houses. A three-story house sells as much HK$8 million, he said.

The concern group said the government should be held responsible for the current difficult situation.

Wan said he believes the Development Bureau's past soft attitude has given "unreasonable expectations" to the "unreasonable demands" of the New Territories villagers.

The group also accused the government of setting double standards toward law enforcement on illegal structures.

Owners of illegal structures on private buildings in urban area are displeased that the government is providing village house owners with a reporting scheme, which doesn't require immediate removal of low-risk structures built before June 18.

"In some cases, the situation of our houses is less serious than that of village houses in the New Territories," said another representative of the concern group, Tsui Sang-hung.

Tsui also complained that the enforcement has no order of priority.

Some dangerous structures have yet to receive removal letters, while some minor ones already have, he said.

Tsui added that homeowners in the urban area are not as "united" as villagers in the New Territories.

"They have more people, bigger voices," he said, "but our feelings should not be ignored."

On the other side, Chairman of the Heung Yee Kuk Lau Wong-fat called Secretary for Development Carrie Lam on Wednesday morning to talk about the unlicensed building works.

It needs time to find a solution, Wong said after the phone call.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2011, 07:14 PM   #1298
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

No review on duty for 12 months
The Standard
Thursday, November 24, 2011

The Special Stamp Duty introduced a year ago to subdue the risk of a property asset bubble and to combat speculators will not be reviewed for another 12 months, the government said yesterday.

Acting Secretary for Transport and Housing Yau Shing-mu told the Legislative Council that the review is due 24 months after it introduction. He added that the duty has had an effect.

Yau said data show that on average there were 85 confirmer transactions a month in the first 10 months.

This, he said, represents "a drop of over 70 percent" compared with 320 a month before the duty was introduced. The Special Stamp Duty was introduced on November 19 last year.

In confirmer sales, also known as sub-sales, parties strike a sale and purchase agreement, but the property is sold to another before the sale is legally completed.

These sales are a useful indicator of the property market players chasing short-term capital gains.

Referring to sales, Yau told Legco that primary and secondhand deals have fallen by 34 percent to 75,000 up to October this year, compared with 113,000 transactions in the same period last year.

He said there were 67,000 secondhand property transactions in the first 10 months, down by about 34 percent compared with 101,000 in the same period of last year.

In the first nine months, property prices have risen 13 percent, he said, but have fallen by 2 percent since June.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 9th, 2011, 04:15 AM   #1299
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

No review on duty for 12 months
The Standard
Thursday, November 24, 2011

The Special Stamp Duty introduced a year ago to subdue the risk of a property asset bubble and to combat speculators will not be reviewed for another 12 months, the government said yesterday.

Acting Secretary for Transport and Housing Yau Shing-mu told the Legislative Council that the review is due 24 months after it introduction. He added that the duty has had an effect.

Yau said data show that on average there were 85 confirmer transactions a month in the first 10 months.

This, he said, represents "a drop of over 70 percent" compared with 320 a month before the duty was introduced. The Special Stamp Duty was introduced on November 19 last year.

In confirmer sales, also known as sub-sales, parties strike a sale and purchase agreement, but the property is sold to another before the sale is legally completed.

These sales are a useful indicator of the property market players chasing short-term capital gains.

Referring to sales, Yau told Legco that primary and secondhand deals have fallen by 34 percent to 75,000 up to October this year, compared with 113,000 transactions in the same period last year.

He said there were 67,000 secondhand property transactions in the first 10 months, down by about 34 percent compared with 101,000 in the same period of last year.

In the first nine months, property prices have risen 13 percent, he said, but have fallen by 2 percent since June.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 11th, 2011, 09:05 AM   #1300
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,484
Likes (Received): 17796

Hello Hong Kong!
http://www.google.com/about/datacent...ons/hong-kong/

In September 2011, we announced that we had acquired 2.7 hectares of land in the Tseung Kwan O Industrial Estate in Kowloon, with plans to build a data center. We’re now busy building, and we plan to start bringing the facility online by early 2013.

Building this data center in Hong Kong is an exciting step for us. More new Internet users are coming online every day here in Asia than anywhere else in the world. They are looking for information and entertainment, new business opportunities and better ways to connect with friends and family near and far. We’re building this data center to make sure that our users in Hong Kong and across Asia have the fastest and most reliable access possible to all of Google’s services, so they can do just that.

We are also really excited about the facility itself. At a long-term investment cost reaching USD300 million, this data center will be one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly in Asia, built to the same high standard we use around the world. It will also provide jobs for around 25 full time Googlers along with a number of part and full time contractors, in a variety of roles including computer technicians, electrical and mechanical engineers and catering and security staff.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
hong kong

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu