daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old June 9th, 2005, 10:55 PM   #1
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

HONG KONG | West Kowloon Cultural District Development News

West Kowloon Cultural District: An icon for culture and leisure
http://www.hplb.gov.hk/wkcd/eng/publ...tion/intro.htm

A new cultural district for Hong Kong

The West Kowloon Cultural District (WKCD) will be a landmark development that enhances Hong Kong's position as a world city of culture. The new cultural district will bring together a vibrant mix of performing and visual arts. The 40-hectare waterfront site will be both a showpiece for urban design and a meeting point for the local and international arts communities.

In this cluster of venues and open space, long-term commercial, community and cultural partnerships will encourage a lively arts scene for generations to come. Based on the principle of "partnership", the WKCD will be "community-driven" and "people-oriented".

A grand canopy, providing shade and shelter for the facilities below, will make the complex a new Hong Kong icon. With its sinuously flowing form, this feature was, in February 2002, chosen by an international jury from over 160 entries as the winner of an international concept plan competition. It was adopted as the basis for inviting proposals from the market in September 2003. By June 2004, five proposals had been received, three of which met the basic requirements. These proposals are now being assessed.

The core facilities

* Three theatres with at least 2,000, 800 and 400 seats respectively;
* A performance venue with at least 10,000 seats;
* A cluster of four museums at least 75,000 square metres in size;
* An art exhibition centre at least 10,000 square metres in size;
* A water amphitheatre;
* At least four piazzas; and
* A canopy covering at least 55% of the development area.

Other highlights

The district will integrate commercial and residential development into the arts, cultural and leisure facilities. This integrated approach will ensure more visitors and bring benefits to all the sectors involved.

The district will have at least 20 hectares of parkland and public open space, an area larger than Victoria Park.

The waterfront promenade will be 50% longer than the promenade from the Tsim Sha Tsui clock tower to the Hong Kong Coliseum.

An automated people mover will link the major facilities within the district while public transport will link the district with the business heart of Kowloon.

Where is it?

The development site is bounded by Canton Road in the east, the Western Harbour Tunnel entrance and Austin Road West in the north, and Victoria Harbour in the west and south.

The benefits for Hong Kong

The WKCD will:
* Enrich our cultural life by attracting internationally acclaimed performances and exhibitions;
* Nurture local arts talent and create more opportunities for arts groups;
* Enhance international cultural exchange;
* Put Hong Kong on the world arts and culture map;
* Provide state-of-the-art performance venues and museums;
* Offer more choices to arts patrons;
* Encourage creativity;
* Enhance our harbour front;
* Attract overseas visitors; and
* Create jobs.

What happens next?

The Government will need to take into account public views in negotiations and selection of a preferred proposal. It will then consult the Legislative Council (Legco) and the Town Planning Board (TPB) on the preferred proposal and seek approval from the Executive Council before signing a provisional agreement with the proponent. Next, the Government will submit the agreed development parameters for the proposal to the TPB for incorporation into the draft Outline Zoning Plan (OZP). This will be gazetted for public inspection and comment under the Town Planning Ordinance. The TPB will then make its decision, after considering all representations received, and submit the amended Draft OZP to the Executive Council for approval. The Project Agreement will only be finalised and executed after the completion of this statutory planning procedure and other relevant statutory procedures and approval by the Executive Council.

Once selected, the successful proponent will design, finance and complete the development of the project and operate, maintain and manage the core arts and cultural facilities for 30 years. Construction is expected to begin in April 2007, with the first phase of the project opening in 2011.

Single-development approach

After weighing the pros and cons of single versus split tendering, the Government believes that having a single developer to co-ordinate the project is the best option. Development as a single package is conducive to centralised planning and co-ordination, leading to smoother operation, economies of scale, lower costs and shorter construction lead-time. Splitting the contract could cause problems in aligning the design, construction and schedule of the infrastructure, for example, the canopy and the automated people mover. Split tendering would also create additional costs and delays by forcing the Government to sell separate parcels of land, which could take years, and by increasing the risk of litigation over separate land leases. Under a split-tender model, proceeds from land sales would not necessarily be spent on arts and culture. Hence, development of a cultural district and creation of jobs via the project would not materialise in the short to medium term.

Your views are important in shaping the WKCD

To help the public better understand the screened-in proposals and to facilitate an informed discussion, the Government is staging a consultation exercise with exhibitions, and discussion forums for the public. In response to the request of Legco and having reviewed the progress made in the public consultation exercise, the Government has decided to extend the consultation period to the end of June, 2005. The exhibition was first staged at the Hong Kong Science Museum, Tsim Sha Tsui, from December 16, 2004 to January 31, 2005; then at Hong Kong City Hall in Central from February 5, 2005 to March 28, 2005. The exhibition will continue at the Thematic Galleries 1 & 2, Hong Kong Heritage Museum, 1 Man Lam Road, Sha Tin, from April 16, 2005 to June 30, 2005.

Please send us your views, as they will be taken into account in negotiations and selection of a preferred proposal. The Government has commissioned an independent academic research institute to analyse and assess views collected in this consultation exercise. The report will be made public.

Proposals

Dynamic Star


Sunny Development


World City Culture Park
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old June 9th, 2005, 10:58 PM   #2
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Background



The Concept Plan Competition for the Development of an Integrated Arts, Cultural and Entertainment District at the West Kowloon Reclamation, Hong Kong, organized by the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government, was concluded successfully in February 2002. Five entries out of 161 were awarded prizes.

The Government intends to proceed with development of such a district and has adopted the first prize winning entry to the concept plan competition, submitted by a team led by Foster and Partners of the UK, as the basis for the masterplan.

On 5 September 2003, the Government announced an Invitation For Proposals for the Development of the West Kowloon Cultural District. The area of the site earmarked for the new district is about 40 hectares. While the Government requires provision of certain specified facilities, proponents are allowed considerable freedom in developing viable proposals. The project provides a rare opportunity for the planning, design, construction and operation of a major integrated development of world class cultural and commercial facilities.

The invitation is open internationally to proponents experienced in developing, marketing and managing major mixed-use property developments. The deadline for submission of proposals is 19 June 2004.

Concept Plan Competition

This Competition invites conceptual proposals for the development of a prominent waterfront area (the Scheme Area) at the West Kowloon Reclamation (WKR) in Hong Kong into an integrated arts, cultural and entertainment district. The objective is, through the development, to enhance Hong Kong's position as Asia's premiere centre of arts, culture and entertainment and create a new look for Victoria Harbour.

The Scheme Area is a newly reclaimed site of 40 hectares at the southern tip of the WKR in Kowloon Peninsula, Hong Kong.



The Proposals

The concept plan proposals should provide vision and innovative and viable ideas that will shape the future development of this waterfront area as a unique attraction for both local people and visitors. The proposals should be aesthetically attractive, functional, broadly feasible and in compliance with the policy objectives of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (the HKSARG) in promoting arts and culture.

Development of Scheme Area

There is no linkage between the Competition and the eventual development right of the Scheme Area. It is the intention of the HKSARG that following the Competition, a team will be appointed through the normal consultants selection process, to finalize a detailed masterplan for the Scheme Area on the basis of the winning conceptual proposals, if appropriate. Winners of the Competition would be automatically pre-qualified for inclusion in the list of consultants to be invited for bidding for the masterplanning work.

Based on the detailed masterplan, the HKSARG will then decide on how the Scheme Area will be developed. Packages within the Scheme Area suitable for private sector development will be decided by public tender, which will be open to all. Subsequent architectural design competitions may be conducted for selected individual buildings/facilities. Winners of the Competition would also be invited to take part in bids for development and informed of the subsequent architectural design competitions for individual buildings/facilities in the Scheme Area.

First Prize Winner : Entry submitted by a team led by Foster and Partners

The Jury felt that this submission, more than any other, fulfilled the purpose of the competition to define a conceptual architectural plan to establish Hong Kong as a city of world class arts and cultural activity. The signature feature of the design, a great canopy, "flows over the various spaces contained within the development" to create a unique landmark. The sinuously flowing form of the site contours and the canopy produce a memorable effect.

The master layout plan, even at this conceptual level, organizes the site to take full advantage of its prime waterfront location and its proximity to Kowloon Park and the Canton Road retail district. The primary components of the design include a cultural hub of auditoria, museums, galleries and performance venues along with a dense collection of shops, bars and retail spaces. The combination of uses proposed lends a great vitality to the scheme, and a continuous promenade along the smooth curvature of the waterfront further enhances the development for cultural and commercial purposes.

In particular, eight aspects distinguish the winning scheme.

The first is the singularity of image, offering coherent visual authority and something that will become immediately recognizable with Hong Kong and an icon around the world. The image is also progressive, well suited for Hong Kong in the 21st Century.

The second aspect is the horizontality of the scheme across the site that does not attempt to compete with but rather counterpoints the tall buildings behind.

The third aspect is the presence of a multiplicity of public-space opportunities at various scales.

The fourth is the introduction of substantial green space into the heart of Hong Kong, both symbolically and as a real amenity for citizens.

The fifth aspect is the logical and imaginative deployment of programmatic elements and the inherent idea of drawing people through the commercial and entertainment portion of the complex to the arts and cultural centre beyond. The scheme also allows for a good balance between public and private interests and, in particular, the mix of arts facilities offered. One aspect of the project which gave rise to concern was the lagoon which struck the Jury as perhaps impractical. However, this concern would not negate the construction of a similar public space, including a water body disconnected from the harbour.

The sixth distinguishing aspect of the scheme is the skilful way in which integration can be achieved with surrounding neighbourhoods and complexes. The links to Kowloon Station and to Kowloon Park, in the east, are particularly good examples, as is the people mover supporting this linkage.

The seventh aspect is the viability of the scheme, which is technically straightforward, consisting of a large mall, two taller structures at either end of the site - one associated with the arts and cultural complex - and a large roof that is well within the ambit of known technology and experience.

Finally, as the eighth aspect, the jury was impressed by the well-argued case in support of the scheme.

In conclusion, the Jury felt that this bold scheme is a clear and deserving winner of the competition. The great canopy would create an unmistakable landmark for Hong Kong. It would be a major tourist attraction. It would symbolize the community's vision of their city as a future centre of arts and culture and realise that vision with great style.









Second Prize Winner : Entry submitted by a team led by Mr Philip Y K LIAO

The Jury felt that this submission has immense energy and dynamism in its bold horizontal architectural forms and is well suited to the vibrant nature of Hong Kong. It has many interesting ideas. Imaginative contouring of the site produces a waterfront park and green oases within the landscape. The extensive use of water-pools, waterfalls and mists - as a landscape element - is prevalent throughout the master plan and culminates in a spinal waterway running the length of the scheme area, effectively bringing a part of Victoria Harbour onto the site.

In several regards, the second prize-winning scheme has similar features to the winning submission, including a general feeling of horizontality, a multiplicity of environments and a coherent programmatic response. Although the expressive architectural language is different, the second place scheme does also offer a distinctive image with a progressive spirit. The well-articulated arts and cultural complex is notable, although, on balance, the scheme lacks the expressive authority of the winner and is less straightforward in accommodating some programmatic components.









Honourable Mentions (3) (of equal standing):

Three schemes were selected by the Jury for Honourable Mentions because they offered interesting alternative ways in which the site could be tackled.

Entry submitted by a team led by Professor Minoru TAKEYAMA

The Jury awarded an honourable mention to this entry (the "Jewel scheme") for its elegant and well-balanced simplicity and the appropriate distinctions it draws between cultural and commercial uses.









Entry submitted by a team led by Mr Alan MACDONALD, Urbis - LPT (Architects) Association

The Jury awarded an honourable mention to this entry (the "West End scheme") for the manner in which it provided a "fieldscape" of a fine grain of individual buildings, landscapes and public spaces. This feature is intended to create a vibrant congenial area of individual galleries and theatres on a par with the lively West End area of London.









Entry submitted by a team led by Mr Rocco Sen Kee YIM

The Jury awarded an honourable mention to this entry (the "New Leaf scheme") for its innovative design and the unifying feature of a circulation spine connecting and providing access to all the many activities on the site. This design also took great advantage of a multi-level urban promenade along the waterfront. It also proposed an upbeat, media-oriented image and took explicit advantage of the site's location and public outlook back towards central Hong Kong. All in all, a very lively and compelling solution.







__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2005, 04:20 AM   #3
michal1982
Condom User
 
michal1982's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 712
Likes (Received): 1

when construction will start??
michal1982 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2005, 04:33 AM   #4
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Quote:
Originally Posted by michal1982
when construction will start??
Originally, construction is expected to begin in 2006, but the project is under public scrutiny and might be delayed.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2005, 04:34 AM   #5
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Speech on West Kowloon Reclamation Concept Plan Competition
Thursday, February 28, 2002
Government Press Release

The following is a speech (English only) delivered by the Secretary for Planning and Lands, Mr John C. Tsang, at the cocktail reception in honour of the Jury for the West Kowloon Reclamation Concept Plan Competition this evening (February 28):

Lord Rothschild, Members of the Jury, Ladies and Gentlemen,

If I can divert you for a few moments from your keen interest in the winning entries, I would like to welcome you all to this cocktail reception in honour of the Jury for the West Kowloon Reclamation Concept Plan Competition.

The aim of the competition is to identify innovative concepts for the development of an arts, cultural and entertainment district in Hong Kong that is of outstanding architectural merit and has the facilities to place us firmly on the international cultural map. We are looking for an urban miracle. We intend to turn this piece of land reclaimed from our precious harbour in West Kowloon into a cultural oasis that will enrich the lives of our citizens, attract visitors from neighbouring cities and enhance even further one of the most beautiful skylines in the world with distinguished landmark built forms.

Over the past few days - since Sunday, in fact - the Jury has been meeting behind closed doors in City Hall, conscientiously sifting through the 161 entries to the competition to find those with the potential to realise our objective.

I am reliably informed that the Jury had a debate worthy of the heights that we are aiming for. The Jury's decision was announced to the world in a live broadcast on the internet this afternoon by Lord Rothschild, the Chairman of the Jury, and we have the good fortune to be among the first to see the winning entries.

We are, indeed, honoured to have Lord Rothschild as the Chairman of the Jury. He has impeccable credentials to serve in this capacity, being a member of the Jury for the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize.

We are also pleased to be able to bring together in the Jury members prominent in the fields of architecture, culture and heritage, engineering, planning, strategic development and tourism. I would like to recognize each one of them:

Lord Rothschild
Professor Peter Droege
Mr Peter Rogers
Professor Peter Rowe
Professor WU Liangyong
Mr Nicholas Brooke
Professor CHANG Hsin-kang
Hon Mrs Selina CHOW Liang Shuk-yee
Professor Patrick LAU Sau Shing
Hon LEUNG Chun-ying

On behalf of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, I would like to commend and extend our warmest appreciation to Lord Rothschild, the jurors, the Honorary Special Advisor Mr I M Pei who is not able to join us today, and the Professional Advisor to the competition, Mr Bill Lacy, for their hard work serving on the Jury and their contribution to promoting the arts and cultural development in Hong Kong.

Thank you very much.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2005, 04:38 AM   #6
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

West Kowloon Reclamation Concept Plan Competition

Speech by Lord Rothschild, GBE, Chairman of the Jury,
at a Press Conference held at 3.45 pm on 28 February 2002
at the Central Government Offices, Hong Kong,
announcing the winning entries to the Competition


Ladies and Gentlemen,

It is my pleasure to be here with you today on such an important occasion. I am privileged to have been asked to serve as Chairman of this distinguished Jury.

The main purpose of the International Jury that the Hong Kong Government assembled was to choose a scheme for the West Kowloon Reclamation Project of such interest and distinction that it would establish Hong Kong as a true world-class city of arts and culture.

May I thank the Secretary for Planning and Lands, Mr John C Tsang for his help and support. The Jury would like to express its appreciation to him for having given us a remarkable opportunity.

We saw as a key objective a scheme which would create an unmistakable architectural symbol for Hong Kong, an image recognized throughout the world.

We could never have accomplished our goal without the immense help we have received at every stage from the Hong Kong Government - both politicians and officials believe passionately in the development of the West Kowloon site.

One measure of the success of the competition is that no less than 161 architecture and planning practices submitted schemes : 90 from overseas, 71 locally. This was a tremendous response.

Let me say something about the process.

In keeping with Hong Kong policy, the Competition was open to all qualified participants and the applicants were anonymous to the Jury. In fact no member of the Jury knew the individual identity of the winning schemes until noon today, although we made our choice yesterday.

After much deliberation and thought throughout this week the Jury overwhelmingly concluded that we had found the entry most likely to deliver the key objectives we were seeking. Altogether we are awarding 5 prizes; I would like to start by showing the schemes of the 3 Honourable Mentions and the Runner-Up.

Here are brief comments on the 3 honourable mention schemes:

Jewel Scheme

A team led by Professor Minoru TAKEYAMA

The Jury awarded an honourable mention to this entry for its elegant and well-balanced simplicity and the appropriate distinctions it draws between cultural and commercial uses.

West End Scheme

A joint team led by Mr Alan MACDONALD, Urbis-LPT (Architects) Association

This honourable mention was notable for the manner in which it provided a "fieldscape" of a fine grain of individual buildings, landscapes and public spaces. This feature is intended to create a vibrant congenial area of individual galleries and theatres on a par with the lively West End area of London.

New Leaf Scheme

A team led by Mr Rocco Sen Kee YIM

An honourable mention from the Jury was given to this entry for its innovative design, and the unifying feature of a circulation spine connecting and providing access to all the many activities on the site. This design also took great advantage of a multi-level urban promenade along the waterfront. It also proposed an upbeat, media-oriented image and took explicit advantage of the site's location and public outlook back towards central Hong Kong. All in all, a very lively and compelling solution.

I will now tell you briefly about the scheme of the Runner-Up.

2nd Prize

A team led by Mr Philip Y K LIAO

This submission has immense energy and dynamism in its bold horizontal architectural forms and is well suited to the vibrant nature of Hong Kong. It has many interesting ideas. Imaginative contouring of the site produces a waterfront park and green oases within the landscape. The extensive use of water-pools, waterfalls and mists - as a landscape element - is prevalent throughout the master plan and culminates in a spinal waterway running the length of the scheme area, effectively bringing a part of Victoria Harbour onto the site.

Now, let me turn finally to the winning scheme.

1st Prize

A team led by Foster and Partners

The Jury felt that this submission, more than any other, fulfilled the purpose of the competition. The signature feature of the design, a great canopy, "flows over the various spaces contained within the development" area to create a unique iconic landmark. The canopy employs the latest design and construction techniques and creates under its dramatically fluid form a great spatial volume to accommodate open park spaces shared with individual cultural, residential and commercial buildings.

The master plan takes full advantage of the prime waterfront location and its proximity to Kowloon Park and the Canton Road retail district. The sinuously flowing form of the site contours and the canopy produce a memorable effect. The lagoon, though a relatively weak point in the design, in the opinion of the Jury, might easily be redesigned, without affecting the arts and cultural facilities encircling it or detracting from the overall excellence of the scheme.

The primary components of the design include a cultural hub of auditoria, museums, galleries and performance venues as well as a dense collection of shops, bars and retail spaces. The multitude of proposed uses lends a great vitality to the scheme. A continuous promenade along the smooth curvature of the waterfront simply enhances further the attraction of the scheme and its possibilities for development both for cultural purposes and retail and commercial uses.

The construction of the large roof structure is similar in concept to certain international air and rail terminals constructed in recent years and would create an unmistakable landmark for Hong Kong. The horizontality of the scheme contrasts well with the predominant verticality of the city behind.

The Jury felt that this bold and the carefully analyzed scheme was the deserving winner of the competition and would be a major tourist attraction. It would symbolize the community's vision of their city as a future world centre of arts and culture and realize that vision with great style.

There are three questions which I am sure will be paramount in your minds. First what will the winning scheme cost? Two, who will pay for it? And Three, what will be the benefits?

Let me stress that the scheme presented will need extensive development this will take place over the next few months. The details of competition submissions will be made available to you over this period. The submissions will be the subject of a public exhibition.

On costs. The winning scheme estimated preliminary construction costs at 24 billion HK$. The scheme calculates that recurring annual revenues would generate roughly 2.5 billion HK$.

Who will pay for all this?

The project represents unique opportunities to operate a range of public and private facilities within one development in a way that the entire development could function in a seamless and integrated manner.

How this will be achieved must be for the Government of Hong Kong and the private sector to devise.

Finally, who will benefit? We have seen on a number of occasions over the last few years, how a cultural and architectural landmark of integrity and distinction can bring about dramatic economic and regenerative benefits to a place, to tourism, and to the people who live there. Bilbao comes to mind so does the impact in London of the Tate Modern Museum in the previously run-down area of the South Bank. Looking back, we can but recall the phenomenal effect of the Centre-Pompidou in Paris.

I would be surprised if a development on this scale and of such quality on the West Kowloon site would not have a dramatic impact for Hong Kong and the people who live here and those who will visit this already wonderful city.

Let me end by thanking my colleagues on the Jury, Mr Bill Lacy and Mr I M Pei, our Professional Advisors, and the staff of the Planning and Lands Bureau.

I would now like to relinquish the podium to a member of the Jury who lives here, for the last word. I am going to ask Mrs. Selina Chow, Chairman of the Tourism Board, to express her feelings about the project and its benefit to the community.

Thank you very much!
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 06:36 AM   #7
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Greens attack West Kowloon plan changes
Keith Wallis
30 July 2003
Hong Kong Standard

Green groups are up in arms over "very naughty" plans by the government to change the use of a 45-hectare swathe of waterfront on the West Kowloon reclamation from open space to "other specified uses".

Their opposition stems partly from the relatively short period of time the Town Planning Board (TPB) has allowed for objections to the plans. Any objections have to be lodged by Friday - just three weeks after the proposed amendments were published in the Government Gazette.

"It's very naughty," Society for Protection of the Harbour chairman Winston Chu said yesterday.

The society, which won a court case against the government earlier this month over its plans for the second phase of the Wan Chai reclamation, is one of at least two groups which object to the amendments.

The changes, which are intended to pave the way for the development of the Norman Foster-inspired arts, cultural and entertainment complex, have also been criticised because of the lack of subsequent planning controls if they are approved.

Under the TPB guidelines, once the changes are made the government would be free to go ahead and develop residential and office towers, information technology and telecommunications industries, schools and training centres.

So far, the harbour protection society chaired by Chu, and Civic Exchange, the public-policy think tank created by former legislator Christine Loh, have confirmed they plan to object.

Chu said: "If the change in zoning to other uses is approved, a third of the West Kowloon site will be without any statutory planning controls."

He added that if the change in use was given the green light there "would be no public objection process, no opportunity to make amendments or for the TPB to disallow them" to whatever the government subsequently decided to build.

Consequently there "would be no height controls, no plot ratio controls, and anything goes. It's such a large site, the government could decide to build twenty 88-storey towers and there isn't anything anybody could do about it," Chu said.

He believed the board would be abrogating and delegating its powers and responsibilities by giving so much power to the government on such a massive site.

Chu said the government's fickleness over the chequered history of the Tamar site in Admiralty showed controls needed to be maintained otherwise the planning process would be brought into disrepute.

The Tamar development was initially earmarked for commercial building in the mid-1990s. Later it was zoned for government, institutional and community use in 1999, subsequently reverting to a commercial site.

According to the gazette notice, the TPB plans to make five changes to the original southwest Kowloon plan.

The first is to widen the area covered by the site to include the Tsim Sha Tsui fire station complex and part of Canton Road.

Secondly, it plans to rezone a stretch of the waterfront from commercial, residential, open space, government institution or community, a pier, road and support buildings, to "other specified uses" - arts, cultural, commercial and entertainment uses.

The board also wants to rezone the fire station from government to other specified uses and a strip of land in the Yau Ma Tei public cargo working area from road to government, institutional or community use.

The Foster scheme, which is being amended by the government, includes a cultural hub of museums, galleries and performance venues along with a shopping precinct under a tent-shaped roof.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 06:39 AM   #8
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

HK Govt To Make 70% Of HK$24B Cultural Devt For Comml Use
5 September 2003

HONG KONG - (Dow Jones)- The Hong Kong government said Friday it plans to devote more than half the space at a planned HK$24 billion cultural development to residential and commercial use in order to make the project self-financing.

The government said it is inviting proposals for construction of the "West Kowloon Cultural District" - a reclaimed 40-hectare waterfront site that is to be turned into an arts and cultural complex.

The winning bidder will be required to design, finance, build and manage the project, although proposals must follow guidelines set out by the government.

A total gross floor area of 726,285 square meter is planned for the key development components, but 70% of that will be set aside for offices, hotels, retail space and residential use.

Core arts and culture facilities will make up 29% of the total gross floor area. Such space will have to include three theaters, a 10,000-seat performance venue, and an art exhibition center.

A giant glass canopy is to cover at least 55% of the site.

Chief Secretary Donald Tsang said he expects the project to be self-financing, with income generated from residential and commercial components, although he stressed economic considerations were second in importance.

"The ultimate aim of the project is to build a world class artistic and cultural icon for Hong Kong," said Tsang. "We won't allow the project to become a property project."

Most of Hong Kong's property giants are interested in the massive project. Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltd. (H.SHP) defeated a long list of competitors to win the conceptual planning competition for the project in early 2002.

-By Chan Ka Sing, Dow Jones Newswires; 852-2802-7002; [email protected]
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 06:42 AM   #9
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Statement by CS
Friday, September 5, 2003
Government Press Release

Following is the Statement by the Chief Secretary for Administration, Mr Donald Tsang, at a press conference announcing the Invitation for Proposals for the development of the West Kowloon Cultural District, Hong Kong today (September 5):

Today, I am very happy to announce that the Government is inviting proposals from the private sector to develop our very own cultural icon - that is, the West Kowloon Cultural District. We already have an exciting, world-class concept for the site and now we are going to turn the vision into reality.

It is all part of our positioning as Asia's world city. We want Hong Kong to be the most vibrant hub for culture, arts and entertainment in the region. When completed, state-of-the-art facilities will provide residents and visitors with a wide range of cultural and leisure pursuits. Our local artists will also have a creative hive in which to further develop their talent.

The magnificent, flowing canopy sheltering the development area will become a new Hong Kong icon. Cultural and commercial facilities on the site will not only draw more tourists to Hong Kong, it will help attract more world-renowned performers and add to our attraction as the most cosmopolitan and dynamic international business centre in Asia.

We expect the project to bring substantial, long-term economic benefits to Hong Kong and, in the short term, provide about 6,000 jobs.

In keeping with our philosophy of 'small government', we are going to invite the private sector to finance, construct and run this project. This is the first time we have invited the private sector to build and operate major arts and cultural facilities. We believe the private sector will be able to run these facilities more cost effectively, and will also enjoy greater flexibility to finance, develop and manage them. We are confident that the private sector will be interested in the project if it is offered as a commercial package that provides enough flexibility to produce a workable scheme.

You can see from the picture behind me what we have in mind. This shows the 'Government's baseline' of the site. The future development envisages : -

* performance venues, museums and some residential development in a cultural headland at the western end of the site

* a multi-level complex of entertainment and retail facilities in the middle of the site

* a commercial gateway at Canton Road with high rise developments

* extensive open space for public use comprising a podium park, landscaped terraces and a waterfront promenade

* an automated people mover running from one end of the site to the other; and

* a spectacular canopy.

The 'Government's baseline' is intended as a starting point for proponents. But, these parameters are not fixed. Proponents may suggest a higher development density or a different mix if they provide acceptable justification and do not compromise the character of our baseline scheme. This provides proponents with flexibility in the design of the main revenue-producing parts of the project, while the canopy limits the intensity of development that can be proposed.

I must stress that, while property development is essential to the project's viability, we will not allow the cultural facilities to play second fiddle. There are certain mandatory requirements that must be complied with. Apart from the canopy, these include the provision of the following core arts and cultural facilities -

* a complex of three theatres with seating capacities of at least 2,000 seats, 800 seats and 400 seats

* a performance venue with a seating capacity of at least 10,000 seats

* a museum cluster comprising four museums of differing themes with total net operating floor area of at least 75,000 square metres

* an art and exhibition centre with net operating floor area of at least 10,000 square metres

* a water amphitheatre and at least four piazza areas.

We are particularly keen that these core facilities should be architecturally distinguished. We will monitor their operation to ensure that they maintain the highest standard. Proponents of course can also propose additional arts and cultural facilities.

Development proposals have to cover the planning, design, construction, operation, maintenance, management, marketing and promotion of the new district. The deadline for proposals is March 19, 2004, that is about six months from now.

We will assess the proposals in accordance with the criteria set out in the invitation document. Everything will be on a level playing field. There will be a process of short-listing and negotiation before selection of the successful proponent by the Chief Executive in Council.

We envisage entering into a provisional agreement first, and subsequently a project agreement, with the successful proponent, on the basis of a 50-year land grant.

We expect construction to start by April 2006 and that the theatre complex, the water amphitheatre and the piazzas should come into operation by early 2010, with the performance venue and art exhibition centre by end 2010 and the museum cluster by end 2012. Generally, the phasing of the other parts of the development will be left to the developer.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 06:44 AM   #10
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Arts groups dubious of proposal
6 September 2003
South China Morning Post

Arts groups are sceptical about the government's proposal to redevelop West Kowloon and transform it into a cultural hub.

Ada Wong Ying-kay, chairwoman of the Hong Kong Institute of Contemporary Culture, warned the proposal was focusing too much on physical facilities and not on the art itself.

"It's still the same 'hardware' mentality on building but with arts, it's really the software, the programming and creative projects that matter."

Ms Wong said the government should try to set up independent bodies to run the cultural venues such as museums. "We don't want civil servants or the private sector to run them completely."

Claire Hsu, executive director of private research group Asia Art Archive, said: "I don't think you can build culture like that - build the buildings and hope the arts would come. It's quite worrying. We don't have trained people with the expertise."

Art gallery owner John Batten warned that another plan, also by the government, to redevelop the Central police station and surrounding areas with cultural facilities would conflict with the West Kowloon plan.

"Location is very important and traditionally, commercial arts have tended to develop in Central," he said. "I am not against the West Kowloon development but you need people to live in the area for an art location to build up. Right now it's wasteland." Alex Lo.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 06:50 AM   #11
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

$24b cultural hub to be privatised
By Peter Michael
6 September 2003
South China Morning Post

Donald Tsang opens the West Kowloon project to developers' proposals, vowing that the arts won't play second fiddle The multi-billion West Kowloon redevelopment, aimed at turning Hong Kong into the region's "cultural and artistic hub", will be funded, built and operated by the private sector under a radical plan unveiled yesterday.

The massive project, which has a 30-hectare roof designed by acclaimed architect Lord Norman Foster as its centrepiece, will be offered as a single commercial proposition instead of developed piecemeal, Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen said yesterday.

"This is not another property development project. It is about developing a new cultural icon for Hong Kong," Mr Tsang said as he opened the project for development proposals.

"We want Hong Kong to be the most vibrant hub for culture, the arts and leisure in the region."

Previous estimates have put the project's cost at $24 billion.

A developer would have to work within the "baseline" of Lord Foster's design, Mr Tsang said. Included under the world's biggest roof would be a complex of parks, piazzas, theatres, museums, shops and apartments. However, some elements of the original design, unveiled last year, are optional.

Mr Tsang declared the project open to proposals of interest from consortiums, designers and architects until March 19 next year. "We have a world-class concept for the site and now we are going to turn it into reality," he said.

Mandatory features include a three-theatre complex, a 10,000-seat performance venue, a cluster of four museums with differing themes, an art exhibition centre, a water amphitheatre, at least four piazza areas, landscaped terraces, a commercial section, a 1.5km automated people mover and a 2.5km waterfront promenade.

It also includes the transparent roof which will be spread over the equivalent of about 25 soccer pitches, covering most of the 40-hectare site.

"We are certain that the magnificent flowing canopy overarching a sprawling complex of shops, theatres and parks will help this become one of the icons of Hong Kong. The government is confident there are many global consortiums keen to finance, develop and operate the privatised project," Mr Tsang said.

"We believe if we offer the private sector the chance to finance and build this facility, they will be able to run it more efficiently and with greater flexibility if it is offered as one entire commercial package. However we will not allow any of the proposals to compromise the baseline of our scheme."

In addition to stemming government spending, the decision to fully privatise the project is an attempt to combat the traditional problem of piecemeal development experienced by other large-scale projects in Hong Kong.

Mr Tsang also vowed that the cultural facilities would not be allowed to "play second fiddle" to any commercial ventures, such as apartment blocks or luxury shops. It has been estimated the project will create more than 6,000 jobs, with construction due to start in April 2006. The first phase is to be operational by early 2010, with the project fully completed in 2012.

Under the funding plan, a developer would offer an up-front premium for a 50-year lease or they could work out a revenue-sharing scheme, Mr Tsang said. "These are the sorts of issues that we need to negotiate with interested parties."

He said the government had spent more than $16 million on the project to date with a further $440 million earmarked for roadworks and infrastructure.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 06:53 AM   #12
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Site Photo :



Source : http://www.pbase.com/framewerkz/
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 08:11 AM   #13
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Ambitious arts project gets down to business
8 September 2003
South China Morning Post

The $24 billion plan to transform an expensive piece of reclaimed land in West Kowloon into a vibrant entertainment complex complete with museums, concert halls, exhibition centres and theatres - all under the world's biggest roof designed by Sir Norman Foster - is nothing if not ambitious. But perhaps the most ambitious part of the project was revealed by Chief Secretary for Administration Donald Tsang Yam-kuen last Friday: it is to be funded, constructed, and managed entirely by the private sector.

By taking a back seat and giving private enterprise the responsibility for establishing the Western Kowloon Cultural District, officials are sticking to their "small government" philosophy. This involves retreating from the market and encouraging entrepreneurs to step in and provide services traditionally paid for out of public funds. The approach is an admirable one, especially at a time when we need to cut costs in order to help tackle the spiralling fiscal deficit.

The challenge will lie in successfully adapting this principle to the arts world, where special considerations apply. Our developers are well used to establishing hotels, shopping malls and housing estates. However, building not just one but a number of world-class museums and filling them with unrivalled collections of pan-Asian treasures is not a normal part of their activities. Nor is the staging of pop concerts, classic operas or Shakespearean plays, or bringing hit Broadway shows to Hong Kong.

The arts are not known for their money-spinning potential. Many projects have great cultural value, yet make losses. Without government subsidies, most of Hong Kong's existing performance venues would be unable to survive on meagre corporate sponsorship and fees from concert audiences and museum-goers.

Yet, turning Hong Kong into a vibrant hub for culture, arts and entertainment in the region need not be an impossible dream. High-brow critics may regard Hong Kong as a cultural desert, but the city can rightly take pride in being the Canto-pop and film production capital of the Chinese-speaking world. Our middle class may have been temporarily traumatised by six years of deflation, but its appreciation of the arts is growing by the day.

Already, tourists from the mainland, Taiwan and Southeast Asia are drawn to Hong Kong by concerts put on by stars such as Anita Mui and Andy Lau. With growing wealth and relaxed travel restrictions, more and more mainlanders will be able to afford such travel. A larger audience pool and bigger venues at the new cultural complex in West Kowloon should mean better economies of scale - and higher profits - for promoters as well as venue owners. Promoters who want to bring big shows from overseas but have so far been constrained by a lack of suitable premises should also find it easier to make such projects viable. Whether the shows target a niche audience or the masses, they should all benefit from the bigger and better-equipped facilities to be built at West Kowloon.

The key to making the new cultural complex pay for itself lies in striking a balance between staging lucrative events that will pull in the crowds and offering a diverse range of attractions. That will depend on the forming of a close and effective working relationship between private enterprise, the arts community and the public.

Corporate sponsorship will have a vital role to play. Unfortunately, Hong Kong has a poor record in this regard. We need our own equivalent of the Guggenheims and the Rockefellers to help blaze a trail. Hopefully, the chance to turn the West Kowloon site into Asia's leading cultural and entertainment hub will prove to be the catalyst we need.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 08:14 AM   #14
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Watchdog sought to keep eye on cultural hub project
Chloe Lai
19 September 2003
South China Morning Post

A watchdog group consisting of members of the cultural community, architects and management experts is needed to monitor the planned multi-billion-dollar West Kowloon cultural hub, according to a senior government adviser.

The chairman of the Land and Building Advisory Committee, Yeung Yue-man, said members agreed it would be essential to have a quasi-governmental authority composed of such experts to keep an eye on the massive project.

Under a radical plan, the project will be funded and managed by a single consortium or company.

There have been concerns about the amount of power being granted to the firm that wins the tender to transform West Kowloon into a cultural hub.

The massive project, under a 30-hectare roof designed by Lord Norman Foster as its centrepiece, will be offered as a single commercial proposition; the winning bidder will have management rights for 30 years.

"The idea of turning West Kowloon into a world-class cultural and artistic hub is very good ... but it is crucial that the whole idea can be implemented smoothly, so we need an authority to do the monitoring work," Professor Yeung said.

He said the authority should have power and credibility so it would have the community's respect.

Chris Law, convenor of the Urban Regeneration Task Force, said there must be an independent body to monitor the West Kowloon development.

"Every university has a board to monitor its operation. The same logic should apply to the West Kowloon development work," he said.

Professor Yeung said the authority should be permanent.

"Take a look at other harbour development projects in the rest of the world, there must be an authority to monitor their work. There is one in Sydney and one in Vancouver," he said.

The chairman also said some members of the committee did not agree with the government's decision to make the development a single commercial proposition.

"Some members questioned the feasibility of treating the 40-hectare site as a single proposition. They think it would be more feasible to break down the whole project into several smaller works," Professor Yeung said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 07:47 PM   #15
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Culture clash looms for West Kowloon
Chloe Lai
24 September 2003
South China Morning Post

Culture clash looms for West Kowloon An alliance of arts and planning experts says the project is at risk of producing a 'developer's colony', not a cultural hub.

A battle is looming over the proposed West Kowloon "cultural hub" as architects, planners, artists and academics band together against the government's game plan for the project.

They warned that the idea of granting a single consortium the right to run the 40-hectare site for 30 years was equivalent to ceding West Kowloon to a developer and turning an area the size of a new town into a "developer's colony".

One architectural expert said the government's guidelines left open the possibility that up to 7,600 flats could be built on the site - more the 10 times the official goal.

The People's Council on Sustainable Development, an alliance of 40-plus non-governmental organisations, professionals and social activists, recently met to discuss the campaign's strategy.

Albert Lai Kwong-tak, chairman of the council, said: "The people are being forced to give up our right to administer West Kowloon. In the future, it will be up to the property developer (hellip) to decide who can be a resident."

The alliance called on the government to suspend the project temporarily and come up with a new game plan, which would allow public participation and best protect the interests of the people.

A forum on the project is being prepared to better inform the public about the issue. The groups are trying to raise the issue with the semi-official Council for Sustainable Development.

Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen unveiled the plans early this month aimed at creating a world-class arts and cultural hub. Due for completion in 2012, the project will include theatres, museums, commercial and residential properties.

The chief secretary stressed the best development option was to have the private sector fund the entire project in return for the right to operate West Kowloon for 30 years.

But Mr Lai - who coined the term "developer's colony" for the possible outcome of the project - questioned how much bargaining power the government would have after granting the project to one consortium.

He said upsetting the developer might jeopardise the whole project.

For the best interests of Hong Kong, the project should be broken down into smaller works, Mr Lai said.

The Hong Kong Institute of Architects (HKIA) criticised the current arrangement as full of flaws and a violation of the land administration policy.

Bernard Lim Wan-fung, the HKIA's board of local affairs chairman, said every construction in Hong Kong is subject to the Building Covenant, which required developers to sell their developments within a set period of time, usually three to five years. "The developer (would be able) to bypass the law because, with the right to run a piece of land for 30 years, it can sell its development at whatever time it prefers, leaving it the ability to manipulate supply," he said.

Mr Lim questioned Mr Tsang's proposition that only 500 to 600 residential units would be built within the cultural district, claiming the 1.81 plot ratio could result in 7,600 units.

Legislator Emily Lau Wai-hing said she had requested a meeting of Legco's home affairs panel and the planning, lands and works panel so concerns could be voiced.

Ng Mee-kam, an associate professor on urban planning and environmental management at the University of Hong Kong, said the government had hijacked West Kowloon and "handed it to a developer" and would seal all information about the project "in the name of commercial interests".
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2005, 07:52 PM   #16
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

HK aims to become the region's hub for culture
Ravina Shamdasani
30 September 2003
South China Morning Post

It is forging agreements with its Asian neighbours and Egypt to boost its image Hong Kong is looking to develop its international image through the signing of cultural co-operation agreements with neighbouring countries and Egypt.

The Home Affairs Bureau is developing memoranda of understanding with Singapore, Thailand, South Korea and Egypt after signing an agreement with the Philippines in February.

Hong Kong yesterday hosted the first Asian cultural co-operation forum in an effort to promote the city as a regional culture hub.

Assistant Secretary for Home Affairs Fong Ngai said: "A memorandum of understanding is basically a formal agreement on cultural co-operation that will bring such co-operation to government level.

"Through that, we can strengthen and put an emphasis on two-way cultural exchanges and explore a higher level of co-operation."

Delegates from Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation countries, including Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Taiwan, Vietnam and the mainland, flew to Hong Kong for the forum.

Secretary for Home Affairs Patrick Ho Chi-ping told dignitaries at the conference that Hong Kong would always be open as a cultural hub for Asia and the rest of the world.

"In the wake of globalisation and a knowledge-based economy, culture and creativity is increasingly seen as an engine for growth and civic pride," Dr Ho said.

"The message is clear enough: the creative business is a global business with local flavours. And by global, we mean we should first start with the good neighbours at our doorstep. As a hub of Asia ... the door of Hong Kong is always wide open."

Singaporean National Arts Council chairman Liu Thai Ker said that the cultural and artistic achievements of the city state and the region showed that Asian culture could stand up well against the trend of globalisation.

Chairman of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts in the Philippines, Evelyn Pantig, shared her country's experiences in providing opportunities to underprivileged children through dance training. She emphasised the importance of nurturing young talent.

The founder of the City Contemporary Dance Company, Willy Tsao, told how he started the group by pooling together money and friends to build a rooftop studio to try to fill a performing arts vacuum in Hong Kong in the late 1970s.

A promotional video with an artist's impression of the planned West Kowloon cultural district was played at the conference, which organisers hope will become a regular event.

Mr Fong said that such conferences provided a good platform to explore initiatives between neighbouring governments and economies.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2005, 04:15 AM   #17
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Developers split over cultural job
7 October 2003
Hong Kong Standard

An attempt by the Real Estate Developers Association (Reda) to convince the government to allow more than one developer to take part in the HK$24 billion West Kowloon cultural district project has been halted after objections from a major developer.

While small to mid-size developers at a recent Reda meeting supported the idea of writing to the government, one large developer, which was not present at the meeting, later voiced its objection to the move.

Leading developer Cheung Kong (Holdings) was among those in support of a letter, sources said, which was to have urged the administration not to grant rights to only one firm that would be responsible for financing, managing and operation of the project.

In announcing invitations for proposals for the West Kowloon development last month, Chief Secretary for Administration Donald Tsang said only one developer would be granted control to "ensure its concept would be consistent".

It is understood Reda will hold more talks on whether to submit a letter to the government.

This is the first time the government has invited the private sector to run a cultural development project. The project will cover 40 hectares at the West Kowloon reclamation site, bounded by Canton Road, Austin Road West, the Western Harbour Tunnel and Victoria Harbour. Tsang expects the project to create 6,000 jobs.

The development includes three theatre complexes, a concert venue, four museums, a water amphitheatre and at least four piazza areas.

The government aims to turn West Kowloon into one of the world's leading artistic and cultural centres - with the developer footing the bill.

The chosen developer would be given a land grant of 50 years.

Tsang believed the developer could generate profits from operating shopping complexes, residential flats, hotels and offices.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2005, 04:17 AM   #18
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Small firms want slice of West Kowloon
Peggy Sito
7 October 2003
South China Morning Post

The project should be split into several tenders, not offered as a whole, they say Small property developers are opposing to the government's plans to grant the $24 billion West Kowloon redevelopment to a single consortium rather than splitting it between individual tenders.

The developers said the government's proposal to grant the development rights to the mammoth project to a single group favoured bigger developers. Under the plan, the consortium will be granted rights to develop 40 hectares of West Kowloon for 30 years.

The chairman of small developer K Wah International, Lui Chi-wo, said: "There are only one or two big property players in Hong Kong who are financially capable of bidding such a huge project. It seems that leading developers will monopolise the development.

"Why not allow both big and small developers to participate? The government should take care of everyone's benefits."

Mr Lui said the redevelopment project should be split into six or seven packages of different sizes, with developers free to bid on all of them.

The massive project, which will have a 30-hectare roof designed by acclaimed architect Lord Norman Foster as its centrepiece, is aimed at turning Hong Kong into the region's cultural and artistic hub, featuring a three-theatre complex, 10,000-seat performance venue, four museums and an art exhibition centre.

The Chinese press has reported that members of the Real Estate Developers' Association were divided on whether the government should offer the project as a single commercial proposition. Smaller players proposed to urge the government to split the projects into several packages while leading developers reportedly supported the consortium plan.

Major developers Sun Hung Kai Properties and Cheung Kong (Holdings) were unavailable for comment yesterday.

Herman Fung Man-hei, managing director of small developer Hon Kwok Land & Investment yesterday said medium and small players hoped the development would be split into several pieces.

"I reckon it may not be a good idea to grant the whole project to one developer or consortium," said Mr Fung.

He said so long that the government closely monitored the master plan, the project's theme would not suffer, even if the site was built in different phases by a number of companies.

Karen Li, director of corporate development of Wing Tai Asia, said the company, as a member of developer's association, did not have a strong view on how the government should grant the project for private development.

But she said the government must take into account several factors before it made its decision.

"For example, will the entire project be completed on schedule when it is granted to one developer or consortium? Or, if it is developed by several different companies, how will (officials) ensure there will not be any conflicts on the cultural theme?" she asked.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2005, 04:21 AM   #19
michal1982
Condom User
 
michal1982's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 712
Likes (Received): 1

so nothing from foster west kowloon
michal1982 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2005, 04:22 AM   #20
zergcerebrates
Registered User
 
zergcerebrates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Guam,Los Angeles
Posts: 2,287
Likes (Received): 62

I like the 2nd place winner more than the canopy one.
zergcerebrates no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu