daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 27th, 2005, 06:14 AM   #181
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Cultural venue for children's dramas
4 December 2004
South China Morning Post

A theatre group plans to stage children's dramas in the West Kowloon cultural district, and says jobs for local actors would be created by its partnership with a consortium shortlisted for the arts hub's development.

Clifton Ko Chi-sum, chief executive officer and producer of Spring-Time Productions, said yesterday the cultural facilities proposed by Dynamic Star International would provide venues for long-running dramas staged by local theatre groups.

Dynamic Star International, a joint venture between Sun Hung Kai Properties and Cheung Kong (Holdings), is one of the three shortlisted bidders for the project. Mr Ko said if the consortium won the bid, his group would stage children's dramas at the children's interactive museum planned for the cultural district.

Cheung Kong (Holdings) executive director Grace Woo Chia-ching said the two property giants, whose housing estates had a total of 400,000 households, could provide a huge marketing network for local drama groups.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old October 27th, 2005, 06:15 AM   #182
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Disclosing hub bid figures 'not in the public interest'
Leu Siew Ying in Meizhou and Gary Cheung
4 December 2004
South China Morning Post

Disclosing the financial details of the three shortlisted proposals for developing the West Kowloon cultural district would hurt public interest, Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen said yesterday.

Mr Tsang said the offers put forward in the proposals must be kept confidential during negotiations between the government and the bidders. "Otherwise, it would weaken the government's bargaining power," he said.

Officials have said that the government's hand would be weakened if contenders knew the financial details of their rivals' bids.

Mr Tsang's remarks in Meizhou , northeast Guangdong, where he is attending a trade symposium, came as the Democratic Party and the Democratic Alliance for Betterment of Hong Kong were planning to urge the government to disclose the bidders' information. Legislators will make their call at Friday's meeting of the Legislative Council's House Committee.

Mr Tsang said disclosing bidding information would also make future bidders unwilling to provide sensitive information and in the end the public would be the loser.

"We have very clear procedures and the price and assessment will be handled with great care," he said.

Mr Tsang called on the public to give the government their full confidence because it had a track record of handling procurements very strictly and carefully.

"We have a team of high-ranking civil servants looking at these documents. We must trust them to do their job," he said.

But DAB legislator Lau Kong-wah said the government would lose its credibility if it refused to disclose the financial details of the shortlisted proposals.

Democratic Party vice-chairman Lee Wing-tat said he was not convinced by the chief secretary's argument that keeping the information secret would protect the public interest.

Sun Hung Kai Properties executive director Alfred So Chung-keung said it would be a great loss to Hong Kong society if the arts hub project, which was expected to generate economic benefits of $216 billion over 50 years, were shelved. Dynamic Star International, a Sun Hung Kai Properties and Cheung Kong (Holdings) joint venture, is one of the three shortlisted bidders for the project.

Mr So said he respected the plan by some activists to stage a march against the government's handling of the bidding process on January 1. "But I hope people give us more constructive views," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 27th, 2005, 06:16 AM   #183
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

'Cultural review needed for museums'
5 December 2004
South China Morning Post

A former exhibition director of the Arts Centre, Oscar Ho Hing-kay, says the government should carry out a cultural assessment to determine the theme of the museums in the West Kowloon cultural district project.

One of the government's specifications for the project is the inclusion of four museums with a total area of 75,000 square metres.

Each will have a separate theme to be determined by the shortlisted consortiums, though the government has suggested the four themes be the moving image, modern art, ink and design.

Mr Ho, chairman of the Hong Kong chapter of the International Art Critics Association, also said Hong Kong lacked experts who had experience in managing big museums.

The government manages 12 museums, a visual arts centre and a film archive. A government spokeswoman said $380 million had been spent on the facilities in 2003-2004. There were no plans to cut spending on the museums.Andy Cheng
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2005, 07:19 AM   #184
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Minister softens government line on culture district
We won't go against popular will, says Patrick Ho

Chris Yeung
5 December 2004
South China Morning Post

The government will not push on with the controversial West Kowloon cultural district project if public scepticism about its merits and long-term financial viability persists after the period of public consultation, according to Home Affairs Secretary Patrick Ho Chi-ping.

"People have the final say," he said yesterday. "What we do in West Kowloon, we do it for people. We will not go against the wishes of the people.

"If they have no confidence [in the three shortlisted proposals], we won't be able to accept it."

Dr Ho, whose portfolio covers culture, was speaking to the Sunday Morning Post as opposition to the way the government is handling the project mounted.

His softer tone - nine days before the 15-week consultation begins - comes only days after Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen took a harder line against opponents of the project in its present form. He said scrapping the single-developer arrangement would mean going back to scratch and claimed this would undermine business confidence and the government's credibility.

The criticism ranges from doubt about the "developer-led", single-consortium model to concern about the giant canopy design and unease over lack of consultation.

Cultural activists have also claimed the project has been tilted in favour of property development and that it lacks a comprehensive cultural blueprint.

Dr Ho said: "When the [property] market was bad and the deficit serious a few years ago, everybody supported the project. Some people feared no one was going to bid for it. We decided to go ahead.

"Why so many noises now? What does the cultural sector really want? It seems their demands keep changing {hellip} We're absolutely keen and committed. It's a chance in a lifetime.

"We have land, but we don't have money. We believe the private sector has more flexibility and creativity than government. If they fail to attract visitors [to the cultural facilities], their properties won't sell well. Cultural and property development can go hand in hand.

"The cultural sector has demanded our Leisure and Cultural Services Department be more flexible and open in [its] operation. We are doing exactly what they want in West Kowloon: allowing private-sector participation."

The home affairs chief stressed the government defined its role as provider of the best environment and pillars for cultural development, leaving its content to be created by society at large.

"Private participation in cultural development is now a global trend," he said. "If people do not have confidence in the arrangement, there's no way the government can push it through."

Dr Ho dismissed fears the arts hub would be dominated by "imported culture", leaving no room for local creative works. Nor he was worried about the lack of a sense of cultural participation in society.

"The West Kowloon project must have relevance to local culture in order to attract local visitors {hellip} We can [also] attract a lot of arts lovers from the mainland and the region."

Dr Ho said the project would have to be scrapped if the single-consortium model was rejected.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2005, 07:20 AM   #185
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

There's no conflict of interest in Chung post, says developer
Sylvia Hui
7 December 2004
Hong Kong Standard

Henderson Land chairman Lee Shau-kee defended the controversial appointment of former senior housing official Elaine Chung, stressing there was no conflict of interest.

Lee said on Monday the former deputy director of housing was not involved in the firm's property projects, despite the fact she had repeatedly appeared at the developer's promotional functions for its West Kowloon Cultural District bid.

Although the retired civil servant is officially responsible for cultural projects with the Hong Kong Ferry Company _ a subsidiary of Henderson Land _ some fear her new job might give the firm an unfair advantage for the HK$40 billion West Kowloon project.

"Chung has never been involved in any work relating to our property projects," Lee said. "It is unnecessary for us to rely on Chung's advice on property development, as we ourselves are experienced in this sector."

Henderson Land deputy chairman Colin Lam said he did not believe there are problems with her taking part in the firm's culture-related projects.

"Chung retired from her position as Director of Urban Services Department in 1999, well beyond the three-year grace period," Lam said.

"When we hired her we didn't expect she would be involved in the West Kowloon project.

"She is employed by Hong Kong Ferry to help the company transform its business model."

But Democrat Cheung Man-kwong and Kwong Chi-kin of the pro-Beijing Federation of Trade Unions said civil service chief Joseph Wong still owes the public a proper explanation for allowing Chung to take up her post.

They accused the Civil Service Bureau of being too lax with approving applications to enter the private sector from former directorate-level officials. The required gap between end of service and new appointments is three years, unless the applicant can prove the new job is not related to the previous position. Cheung said only one in more than 70 such applications was revoked last year. "It was definitely wrong for Joseph Wong to approve Chung's appointment," Kwong said.

Chung left the civil service in 2003.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2005, 07:23 AM   #186
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Four essential monuments to culture
11 December 2004
South China Morning Post

The subject of culture always sparks stimulating discussion across society. And rightly so, for culture is the blood and veins of any community. The West Kowloon cultural project has been captivating the city's attention. The stakes are high. But, in the first place, what is culture? Can it be defined like a mathematical formula? Or is it as variable as society itself and, if so, is there any justification for allocating resources to encapsulate something that can never be fully represented?

Generally, culture can be classified into high culture, popular, folk, local and regional, political, intellectual, social, and religious. Under the umbrella of culture are customs, practices, trends and fashions, as well as habits. These terms are not necessarily mutually exclusive; they quite often overlap.

The current plan for housing the arts involves building four museums. The government has suggested museums of moving image, modern art, ink, and design. This scheme, however, can be improvised to suit the image and reality of Hong Kong as an international metropolis, cultural hub and a community with a strong local flavour. Given the steady progress of democracy (which requires an informed citizenry), the impending major education reforms, and the fact that only two-thirds of our population has a Form Three education or beyond, the kind of museums we provide will be crucial.

A comprehensive museum exhibiting the world's cultural heritage is a fundamental requirement. This should be the principal museum. People who cannot afford to travel overseas would have the opportunity to broaden their own, and their children's, horizons. Exposure to the wonderful achievements of human civilisation often serves as a stimulant to young minds. Such a museum is, moreover, crucial for our young artists to understand that art and culture are related.

It is also logical for Hong Kong to have a museum specialising in Chinese art. Five thousand years of culture deserves its own space. Such a museum will enhance the cultural sentiment of a people whose civilisation's diversities, multi-faceted developments and dynamic transformations manifest themselves in artistic expressions that are just as mesmerising and variegated.

Our unique local culture also deserves its own space. It should adopt a flexible approach, giving space to experimental work by our budding artists, Chinese and non-Chinese alike. Its peculiar charm will lie in the paradox of a "local" museum that is not parochial, but transregional and transcultural. This characteristic will highlight Hong Kong's history and uniqueness as the Pearl of the Orient.

An avant-garde city naturally values contemporary art. This fourth museum will provide space for all sorts of contemporary work. To a degree, it would complement the experimental work of our local artists and serve to inspire them. The public, too, would get a quick grasp of some of the current trends.

Museums are monuments. Whether it is a giant canopy or a pyramid, the choice ought to be a question of aesthetics. This is what we should be concerned with.

Margaret Chu is senior research officer of the One Country Two Systems Research Institute
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 31st, 2005, 02:04 AM   #187
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

The acid is on Donald Tsang in chief executive stakes
12 December 2004
South China Morning Post

Donald Tsang Yam-kuen, arguably the most popular official in the Tung Chee-hwa administration, has become a target of political satire because of his leading role in the controversial West Kowloon cultural development project.

A political cartoon on the internet ridiculed Mr Tsang as the King of West Kowloon - with respects to street calligrapher Tsang Tsou-choi, who proclaimed himself as King of Kowloon.

The picture of Mr Tsang, the chief secretary, carried the words "trust me".

Consistently on top of popularity polls, Mr Tsang's public support dropped slightly this month as the row over the cultural hub project intensified.

A University of Hong Kong poll shows his rating fell 2.1 points, from 62.8 out of 100 to 60.7. He shared the top ranking with security minister Ambrose Lee Siu-kwong. Pollsters attribute his dip in popularity to the West Kowloon cultural hub controversy.

As head of a high-powered taskforce on the project, Mr Tsang has been fighting public scepticism and mistrust over crucial details.

The taskforce's insistence on the giant canopy design and the "single-consortium" development model has been criticised as calculated to favour big property developers.

This is despite efforts by Mr Tsang and his top aides to convince the community that granting the development and operation rights to one consortium is the best option.

If Mr Tsang is bogged down over the West Kowloon plan, he would probably find the issue of constitutional reform a maze with no signposts to a political exit.

He was given the job of heading a taskforce on constitutional development for 2007 and 2008, and is due to publish its fourth report in the next fortnight. The taskforce is expected to summarise the spectrum of views over electoral arrangements for the next chief executive and the legislature collected during a consultation drive ending in October.

It marks the beginning of a new, much more difficult phase of seeking consensus on the next step in democratic development.

Officials are hoping for a package of electoral changes with broad support in society and the Legislative Council that it can submit as a mainstream proposal for formal consultation by the middle of next year.

The two contentious issues have been described as the make-or-break challenges for Mr Tsang - a chance for him to show the political acumen, skill and capacity expected of the next chief executive. Once written off as a serious contender because of his key role in the pre-handover administration, Mr Tsang has emerged as a dark horse.

An article in the Chinese-language Ming Pao last week quoted pro-democratic sources as saying visiting mainland figures have sought their views on four likely candidates for chief executive - Mr Tsang, Financial Secretary Henry Tang Ying-yen, Education and Manpower Secretary Arthur Li Kwok-cheung and Executive Council member Leung Chun-ying.

It also said the sources were asked about the desired credentials of the next chief executive and for names of people able to balance the interests of different sectors.

If the report has a ring of truth, it is because Beijing leaders would have given some thought to the helmsman of the third administration.

Their background aside, it will be more important for the likely candidates to deliver results in their respective public portfolios.

This is particularly important as the next administration faces an increasingly difficult and volatile political scene.

A former senior official who has the ear of Beijing said his bet was on Mr Tsang because of Beijing's frustration with the rivalry among business interests.

The West Kowloon cultural hub and constitutional development are demanding tests of Mr Tsang's ability to unite the people behind important reforms.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 31st, 2005, 02:07 AM   #188
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Pompidou pique jeopardises plan for world-class museums
Chloe Lai in Paris
13 December 2004
South China Morning Post

Plans by a contender for the West Kowloon cultural district to have two world-class museums under the same roof may be in jeopardy as senior executives of the Pompidou Centre say they will not work with the "second-class" Guggenheim which operates museums like a "Coca-Cola factory".

Executives of the renowned French contemporary arts museum said their philosophy on managing a museum was totally different from that of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and they would not work with the US-based private museum group in the cultural hub.

"We and Guggenheim have different concepts {hellip} They want to head the [West Kowloon] museum complex; we are just interested in running the modern arts museum. We're not interested in managing a museum together with Guggenheim," Pompidou Centre president Bruno Racine said.

Both museums have signed agreements with Dynamic Star International, a joint venture between Cheung Kong (Holdings) and Sun Hung Kai Properties, to have their museum set up in the city if the company wins the bid to build and run the cultural hub for 30 years.

Guggenheim Foundation director Thomas Krens said early last month that it had not talked to the Pompidou about the project, but looked forward to co-operating with the Parisian museum.

The Guggenheim administers a global network of museums in Berlin, New York, Las Vegas, Venice and Bilbao, while the Pompidou said the Hong Kong project would be its "first and the last" overseas.

Speaking at a dinner to receive a group of Hong Kong journalists in Paris, Mr Racine said whether Hong Kong would have a modern arts museum managed by the Pompidou or the Guggenheim was up to the Hong Kong government. He said there was no communication between the two museums on West Kowloon, nor was it needed.

Pompidou's chief curator Alain Sayag said: "The Pompidou and Guggenheim are on different levels. We're world class, they're second-class. We're national, they're small and private. We're Europe, they're US. Guggenheim does not have enough content. It is good at architecture but not with collection. It is impossible the two of us will merge and run West Kowloon.

"The US culture [in Hong Kong] is too strong and we need to have presence in Asia to counterbalance the American influence."

Alfred Pacquement, the Pompidou's museum director, said: "A museum is not a Coca-Cola factory; you can't have museum branches everywhere in the world."

Dynamic Star said in a written response to a request for comment that it had sought clarification from the Pompidou on the issue and believed there had been a misunderstanding.

"[The Pompidou] said it did not say the two museums cannot coexist. We believe it is just a misunderstanding caused by language," Dynamic Star said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 3rd, 2005, 06:03 AM   #189
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Arts-hub bidder says it may reduce commercial plans
Sunny Development says it wants public views on the project's plot ratio

Kristine Kwok and Gary Cheung
13 December 2004
South China Morning Post

A consortium vying for the West Kowloon cultural hub contract yesterday said it was willing to reduce the commercial and residential development it has planned for the site.

Sunny Development - a consortium headed by Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings) and Chinese Estate Holdings - said it wanted the public's opinions on the matter.

The consortium's proposal for the site includes the highest density of residential and commercial buildings of any bidder, more than twice the government's recommendation.

Sino Land executive director Yu Wai-wai said yesterday: "There is room for reduction [in the plot ratio] and we will listen to the views from the public."

There has been strong concern that the cultural hub could turn into another commercially driven property project. Sunny Development is proposing a plot ratio of 4.3, compared with the government's suggested 1.81.

The plot ratio is the ratio of commercial and residential floor space to the site's total area.

Dynamic Star International, a joint venture of Cheung Kong (Holdings) and Sun Hung Kai Properties, proposes a plot ratio of 3.28, while World City Cultural Park, a subsidiary of Henderson Land, proposes 2.5.

Mr Yu said they would have further discussions with the government on the project. His remarks came after Secretary for Housing, Planning and Lands Michael Suen Ming-yeung said on Friday that property developments on the 40-hectare site had to be kept to a low level.

But in a forum yesterday, the arts sector and activists said public opinion would not count at all in the assessment process.

Ada Wong Ying-kay, chairman of Wan Chai District Council, said the exterior and interior design and the financial arrangements would each account for a third of the 300-point assessment.

"The government has kept saying it will listen to the public, but our voice does not count for any points in the grading," she said.

But Permanent Secretary for Home Affairs Shelly Lau Lee Lai-kuen said at the forum that public opinion would be crucial. She declined, however, to comment on what the government would do if a majority of the public demanded the scrapping of the giant canopy over the site, the key feature of the design by Lord Foster which forms the basis of the project.

A public consultation on the project will start on Thursday, with an exhibition starting on Saturday.

A senior official said the giant canopy, planned to be the world's largest roof, would cost between $2.5 billion and $4 billion.

The government has come under fire for its insistence on building the giant canopy over the cultural district.

Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen had earlier said the glass canopy was one of the main reasons the government had decided to entrust the project to a single developer.

Lord Foster believed such a design would reduce the temperature of the sheltered area, according to Kwan Pak-lam of the Civil Engineering and Development Department.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 3rd, 2005, 06:06 AM   #190
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

We might reduce plot ratio too, say culture hub rivals
Two bidders have matched the offer of another contender to seek public views

Andy Cheng
14 December 2004
South China Morning Post

Two consortiums vying for the West Kowloon cultural hub contract yesterday matched a fellow bidder's offer to consider public views on reducing the site's commercial aspects.

Dynamic Star International, which is a joint venture of Cheung Kong (Holdings) and Sun Hung Kai Properties; and World City Cultural Park, a subsidiary of Henderson Land, said they would negotiate with the government on plot ratios after the public consultation period, which begins on Thursday and ends in March.

Their offers came after Sunny Development - a consortium headed by Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings) and Chinese Estate Holdings - announced on Sunday that it was willing to reduce its planned plot ratio for the site and wanted the public's opinions.

The plot ratio is the ratio of commercial and residential floor space to the site's total area.

Dynamic Star proposes a plot ratio of 3.28, World City 2.5 and Sunny Development 4.3, all higher than the government's suggested 1.81. Commentators have voiced fears that the cultural hub could be turned into another commercially-driven property project.

Sun Hung Kai vice-chairman and managing director Thomas Kwok Ping-kwong said the plot ratio was open to amendment after the public consultation and more discussions with the government.

Colin Lam Ko-yin, vice-chairman of Henderson Land, said the group would seriously consider the public's views, but 1.81 would be the minimum plot ratio it would accept.

Two of the contenders yesterday tried to impress the public by demonstrating their commitment to arts and culture.

The Hong Kong Sinfonietta and Hong Kong Ballet announced they had become strategic partners of Dynamic Star, because it would provide venues for practice and administration. The two arts groups would perform regularly in the cultural hub under the partnership agreement.

Yip Wing-sie, music director of the Hong Kong Sinfonietta, and Helen Ng Han-bing, chief executive officer of the Hong Kong Ballet, said it was difficult to find venues for practice and performances. "Sometimes, the government venues are unavailable because they are used for kindergarten graduation ceremonies," said Ms Yip. She said Dynamic Star would be able to provide performance halls and audio equipment for practice.

Henderson Land meanwhile announced that it would hold two auctions of local artists' work in late February. Henderson would pay commissions and other charges, said Mr Lam. It would also stage exhibitions of the artworks in its shopping centres and invite the artists to introduce their works.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 3rd, 2005, 06:07 AM   #191
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Punishment urged for former civil servant over role in bids
Gary Cheung
15 December 2004
South China Morning Post

The government was urged yesterday to punish retired civil servant Elaine Chung Lai-kwok and civil service chief Joseph Wong Wing-ping over Ms Chung's involvement in bids for the West Kowloon cultural district project.

Democratic Party legislator Cheung Man-kwong said Mr Wong had contradicted himself in his response to criticism about Ms Chung's role with Henderson Land - a contender for the huge project.

Mr Cheung said Ms Chung's pension should be cut for her mistake, and "Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa should punish Mr Wong for his misjudgment".

He spoke after Mr Wong insisted there was no apparent conflict between the former deputy housing director's involvement in the project and the terms of approval for her post-retirement job.

Ms Chung is director of business development for Henderson subsidiary Hong Kong Ferry.

She appeared at press conferences in October and last month to promote the bid by another Henderson unit, World City Cultural Park, for the West Kowloon project. But she quit as cultural adviser with the project proposal on December 3 - after the Civil Service Bureau told her she should steer clear of the bidding process - insisting she had been involved only in its cultural aspects.

In a letter to the Legislative Council's panel on the public service yesterday, Mr Wong, the secretary for the civil service, said his bureau had sought the advice of the Advisory Committee for Post-retirement Employment.

"We concluded that there was no apparent conflict between the terms of approval given for her employment with the ferry company, and the provision of internal advisory service for the part of the company's involvement in the cultural aspects of the West Kowloon project," he said.

"However, the approval did not cover participation in the bidding or promotional activities for the project," he said. Mr Wong said the government had contacted the retired official several times, between May and September, regarding her involvement in the arts hub project.

"She confirmed that she was never involved in land and property matters, and her service with the ferry company relating to the West Kowloon project was limited to cultural aspects," Mr Wong said.

The Civil Service Bureau approached her again last month, after media reports about her presence at the press conferences.

It advised her not to be involved in any activity that might be perceived as providing services to any bidding team.

Ms Chung said she was grateful to Mr Wong for clarifying that she had followed the government's rules and procedures in applying for post-retirement employment. The former civil servant joined the ferry company in April.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 3rd, 2005, 06:13 AM   #192
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Developer's futuristic design ready to tackle the elements
Andy Cheng
15 December 2004
South China Morning Post

A typhoon-proof canopy designed to capture rainwater is a key part of the latest proposal for the West Kowloon cultural hub, unveiled yesterday.

Architectural specialists from the World City Cultural Park, a subsidiary of Henderson Land, briefed the press on the construction details of its proposal - in the lead-up to the public consultation period that begins tomorrow.

David Dumigan, deputy project director of World City Cultural Park, said the design of the canopy had taken into account more than 50 years of typhoons in the region.

The canopy would be made of PTFE, a strong, lightweight material developed by Kajima of Japan. Under the proposal, digital art would be projected onto the roof.

Mr Dumigan said the canopy would be built first, followed by the buildings underneath, including the theatres and museums.

"We [would] build the canopy from the north edge and work towards the south because we want to start the theatre complex underneath first, so that we can get it finished on time by early 2011," Mr Dumigan said.

Rainwater collected from the canopy would be used for sanitation and plant irrigation.

Henderson Land vice-chairman Colin Lam Ko-yin said there was room to adjust the consortium's suggested 2.5 plot ratio because the property price had risen recently. He said the original ratio was formulated when property prices were low.

The plot ratio is the ratio of commercial and residential floor space to the site's total area.

But Mr Lam said the project would be difficult to plan if it was operating at the plot ratio of 1.81 set by the government.

The 1.4km-long, 0.5km-wide canopy, designed to withstand typhoons, had passed laboratory tests, said Leslie Robertson, who is responsible for its structural design.

Mr Robertson was previously involved in the design of the World Trade Centre in New York and the Bank of China Tower in Hong Kong.

An international advisory council of 23 art experts has been formed to advise the consortium on its arts and cultural facilities.

A major feature of the cultural facilities is an area measuring about half a million square feet dedicated to young local artists.

Mr Lam said: "The area, not being set for a specific use at the moment, could be used to hold free lectures, rehearsals and seminars for young local artists."

He also said its four museums - with themes of modern art, ink, design and moving images - would emphasise the work of local artists.

The proposal includes three theatres with capacities of 2,120, 810 and 408 seats, and an 11,142-seat performance venue.

Mr Lam said a fund to nurture young local artists, through rental support and start-up classes, would be established if his consortium was granted the 30-year contract to manage the ambitious West Kowloon project.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 3rd, 2005, 06:15 AM   #193
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Dynamic Star unveils 'low' hub density
Victor Li says plot ratio is just above the government figure
Martin Wong
15 December 2004
South China Morning Post

Shortlisted West Kowloon contender Dynamic Star International yesterday said its planned development density for the cultural hub was only fractionally higher than the government's original plan.

Cheung Kong (Holdings) vice-chairman Victor Li Tzar-kuoi said the plot ratio for the consortium's scheme was 1.861, compared with the government's 1.81. It was the first time the joint venture, which also includes Sun Hung Kai Properties, had given a plot ratio, the formula that calculates residential and commercial floor area against the site's total area.

The figure was well below previous estimates for the Dynamic Star proposal of 3.28, and those of rival bidders. Mr Li said the only development under the canopy would be a hotel, representing a plot ratio of 0.232. Outside the canopy, high-rise blocks and serviced apartments would account for a 1.629 plot ratio.

"The total plot ratio is only 1.861," Mr Li said, adding that the figure for neighbouring areas ranged from 10 for residential sites to 15 for commercial sites. "We have offered 50 per cent more area for arts and culture facilities than the government demanded. We have offered 30 hectares for an outdoor open square and green belt."

He said the consortium was still open-minded about changing the plot ratio and was willing to "be a good listener" to public opinion.

Secretary for Housing, Planning and Lands Michael Suen Ming-yeung said last week that property developments on the 40-hectare site should be kept to a low level.

Sunny Development has proposed a plot ratio of 4.3 and bid rival World City Cultural Park 2.5.

Mr Li also announced a partnership with the newly formed Xiqu Development Centre, chaired by veteran performer Liza Wong Ming-chuen, to promote Chinese Opera. He said two theatres, one with 1,000 seats and another with 400 seats, would be built.

Meanwhile the Pompidou Centre has insisted it enjoys "a long-standing friendly relationship" with the US-based Guggenheim Foundation, despite reports of souring ties over the West Kowloon project.

"The Centre Pompidou is fully committed to the West Kowloon scheme and to the joint venture Dynamic Star, which the Guggenheim is also a part," Bruno Racine, chairman of the Paris-based institute, said.

"We are ready to explore all options to ensure that the project is a great success and that the people of Hong Kong secure a cultural hub of which they can be very proud."

The two have been thrown together by the joint venture after earlier forming separate partnerships.

Mr Racine said that the "friendly relationship" with the Guggenheim was illustrated by their joint initiatives.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 3rd, 2005, 06:18 AM   #194
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Dynamic Star defends proposal for cultural project
Sylvia Hui
15 December 2004
Hong Kong Standard

In an attempt to deflect mounting criticism that commercial greed is the driving motive behind the West Kowloon cultural project, Dynamic Star - one of three bidders shortlisted by the government to develop the controversial project says its proposed plot ratio is not as high as the public believes.

The profit-making components of the Dynamic Star proposal, a joint bid by Sun Hung Kai Properties and Cheung Kong (Holdings), only have a plot ratio of 1.861, Cheung Kong managing director Victor Li said on Tuesday.

The plot ratio is the ratio between the total floor area of a building and the area of the site it is built on.

Dynamic Star and its competitors for the project, Henderson Land and the Sino Land-led consortium Sunny Development, have been criticised for greatly exceeding the plot ratio of 1.81 proposed by the government.

It was reported last month that Dynamic Star's proposed plot ratio was 3.28, an assertion Li denied on Tuesday. Henderson Land proposed a plot ratio of 2.5 and Sunny Development 4.3.

"We will keep listening and be open-minded about the need to alter the plot ratio," Li said.

He also defended the government's much-maligned decision to let a single developer or consortium develop the 40-hectare site. "If we divide the site into smaller plots with roads, the usable land area will become smaller," he said.

Meanwhile, Henderson Land vice- chairman Colin Lam said there is room for lowering the plot ratio because rising property prices can offset the reduced profit margin. He, too, defended the single developer approach, saying it is the only viable way to build the required enormous canopy.

As the race for the cultural hub intensifies, Sunny Development's effort at boosting its cultural profile seems to pale in comparison with the other bidders' attempts.

Dynamic Star on Tuesday said it has secured an exclusive partnership with Chinese opera group Xiqu Development Centre. On Monday it announced agreements with the Hong Kong Ballet and Hong Kong Sinfonietta.

In addition to the four performance venues required by the government, Dynamic Star said it will build a 1,000-seat theatre and a 400-seat experimental playhouse as a permanent base for Chinese opera.

The project's public consultation begins tomorrow and ends in March.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2005, 05:04 AM   #195
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Now for the cultural crisis
Sylvia Hui
15 December 2004
Hong Kong Standard

The government may have survived the Hung Hom Peninsula fiasco but it has had little time to rejoice.

The curtain has barely been drawn on one crisis and yet another looms over plans for the West Kowloon cultural district and tomorrow's public consultation launch for the controversial HK$40 billion project.

It is set to unleash more criticism and raise resentment toward the government _ which is enjoying little relief from developers' decisions not to demolish the never-used Hung Hom blocks _ to new heights.

Central to mounting dissatisfaction over the Hung Hom and West Kowloon projects is suspicion over less-than- transparent deals between property tycoons and a government that tends to play into their hands.

The number of culturally inclined citizens and the necessity, or not, of a canopy over the West Kowloon site aside, disputes over the project focus on the government's insistence on a single developer approach, its stubborn non-disclosure of financial arrangements with the three bidders, and the high plot ratios in their proposals.

It is not difficult to see why the hisses and boos are always directed at the same people when the money always seems to end up in the pockets of the omnipotent property giants.

Heated debates over alleged government-developer collusion in relation to the Hung Hom Peninsula debacle, memories of the Cyberport farce and recently reignited rows over suspected sweet deals at Discovery Bay are potent and dangerous seasonings in the West Kowlooon mix.

"(Disputes over) Hung Hom and West Kowloon stem from fundamentally the same place," University of Science and Technology social science professor Ma Ngok said.

"Both reinforce a common public impression that business concerns are exerting more-than-desired influence on government policies. It's easy to believe that the developer always wins all, and such impressions have become more ingrained these (recent) years."

Anthony Cheung, chairman of think-tank SynergyNet and organiser of the People's Panel on West Kowloon, believes the cultural project will hone public dissatisfaction to an even harder edge.

"Hung Hom has further alienated the government from the people," he said. "The administration's responsibility in the Hung Hom blunder is larger than the developers, but its reaction was passive and its handling of the crisis disappointing.

"More than 500 members of the People's Panel are now against pushing the West Kowloon project, and they comprise a very wide social base."

Cheung calls West Kowloon a dangerous tim bomb, and Ma agrees, adding that this time even pro-government parties are failing to back the administration.

All three leading political parties are demanding disclosure of financial arrangements, such as land premiums, with the prospective developers.

Public resentment will find an outlet in a protest planned for New Year's Day.

City University political science professor James Sung goes so far as to say the coming weeks will see the government facing a far worse crisis than the Article 23 quagmire.

"Hung Hom will not be laid to rest so soon, what with conspiracy theories pointing at government foreknowledge of the demolition, and investigations into why it hid this knowledge," he said.

"And the worst thing is that these accusations are also relevant to the West Kowloon issue, and even to Discovery Bay. People are asking whether a long- weakened government is slowly selling away Hong Kong's property to developers, and the government's credibility is rapidly sliding."

But both Ma and Cheung say the impending West Kowloon crisis is less of an immediate threat to the government than Article 23 and is unlikely to bring half a million protesters on to the streets.

Nevertheless, the rows over Hung Hom and West Kowloon have already done their damage.

A recent popularity poll show that West Kowloon mastermind, Chief Secretary Donald Tsang, has slid from the top of the ladder, while housing chief Michael Suen has practically dropped off the scale.

But government Central Policy Unit chairman Lau Siu-kai insists Hong Kong society is stable. He said on Monday that recent tensions triggered by West Kowloon, Hung Hom Peninsula, and the Link Real Estate Investment Trust do not constitute governance crises.

The controversies, he said, result more from people, now in better economic times, looking back with a fresh perspective on government decisions made during tougher times.

But City University's Sung said discontent is still linked to the government's rejection of a referendum on the introduction of universal suffrage in 2007 and 2008. "Pro-democracy activists are now changing their focus to socio-economic issues, which are virtually everywhere you look."
h
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2005, 05:04 AM   #196
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

The cultural canvas
As public consultation starts for the ambitious development, Chloe Lai finds the three developers vying for the lucrative project are stepping up efforts to convince the government and the public that their proposal is a winner
16 December 2004
South China Morning Post

Is it an iconic roof? Is it a world-class cultural hub? Or is it a jazzed-up luxury property development? The answer depends on who you talk to about the mammoth development planned for West Kowloon. But one thing is certain: it won't be cheap.

So what of the three property giants battling it out to spend the estimated $24 billion building it? How do they plan to get their money back? And what sort of cultural facilities are Hong Kong people going to get?

The South China Morning Post recently accepted an invitation from one of the bidders for the development, Dynamic Star International, to tour the facilities of its chosen cultural partners in five cities around the globe.

The tour of New York, St Petersburg, Bilbao, Paris and Vancouver gave the impression of a site with super-luxury homes overlooking Victoria Harbour, with the Lord Norman Foster-designed roof covering what would be, in effect, the world's biggest clubhouse.

Dynamic Star's plan would see residents sharing the facility with the public and tourists, attracted by a Pompidou museum, a Guggenheim museum, a children's museum and an Andrew Lloyd Webber theatre.

But that may be a small price for residents to pay because they will not have to pay directly for the site's management or maintenance.

An independent board of trustees will recruit people to manage the facilities, and they in turn will be closely monitored by the government, and by the public and politicians.

This is what Dynamic Star - a joint venture of property developers Cheung Kong (Holdings) and Sun Hung Kai Properties - is proposing for the 40-hectare site. There would be offices and residential towers, a retail and entertainment spine and, nearer the water, a cultural headland housing the museums, an art centre, theatres, a water amphitheatre and piazzas.

Centaline Property chairman Shih Wing-ching believes office space could fetch up to $8,000 per square foot. He estimated the apartments would cost about $10,000 per square foot, and the shopping centres would range from $10,000 to $20,000 a square foot.

"I guess the lucrative business will be the shopping mall. With all the world-famous museums, it will attract many people," he said.

The likelihood that the project will bring in big dollars, and the fact that public opinion will be crucial in deciding who wins the bid, is what led the developers to treat 13 print journalists to the 11-day world tour in the lead-up to the project's three-month public consultation period, which starts today.

Dynamic Star is competing with two other bidders in the project: a Henderson Land subsidiary, World City Cultural Park; and the Park of Arts, Recreation and Culture consortium formed by Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings) and the Chinese Estate Holdings.

The government wants to see the prime site transformed into a regional cultural hub to attract tourists from around the world, but it says it does not have the money to materialise the plan. But, while the journalists' tour was supposed to show off the unity of Dynamic Star's plan, it seems the museums it intend to involve have different ideas. Nothing made that clearer than the outburst earlier this week by Pompidou Centre chief curator Alain Sayag, who described the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, to which Dynamic Star hopes to give responsibility for overall management, as "second class".

"It is good at architecture but not with collection," he said. "It is impossible the two of us will merge and run West Kowloon." Things had gone smoothly up until that point.

At the first stop of the journey, journalists visited Science World British Columbia, a leading children's museum which is good at working within its budget. Science World is the developer's choice to run the Children's Interactive Museum at West Kowloon.

Bryan Tisdall, president and chief executive of the museum, stressed it would not overlap with the existing Science Museum in Tsim Sha Tsui. The branch in the cultural hub would be its first outside British Columbia, Canada.

The group then left to visit Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation's museums in New York, Bilbao and St Petersburg. The private museum runs its sites with a philosophy of profit as the priority, and has branches scattered around the world.

Since its opening in 1959, the spiral structure of New York's Guggenheim, built by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, has been regarded as an architectural masterpiece.

The Guggenheim empire has expanded rapidly in the past decade. In 1997, Guggenheim Bilbao, Spain, was opened with help from the Basque government, which paid the foundation a one-off initial fee of US$15 million for the Guggenheim brand.

Thanks to the iconic Frank Gehry-designed building, the museum has become a cultural landmark, attracting millions of tourists to the previously run-down industrial city. Jon Azua, who represents the Basque government on the foundation's board of trustees, said the added tourism revenue had meant the public's initial investment was paid off in a very short period of time.

"Payback was within one-and-a-half years. Our huge investment was rewarded," he said.

Three years after Bilbao, the foundation formed an alliance with Russia's State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg. Their first collaboration was to create a museum - the Guggenheim Hermitage, in Las Vegas. At present, the foundation is helping the Hermitage to build a new wing in St Petersburg so it can display its collection of impressionist works.

The privately owned Guggenheim museums rely on donations, corporate sponsorship and merchandise and ticket revenue for their survival.

This is the model Dynamic Star hopes to pursue within West Kowloon.

The tour ended with a trip to Paris' Pompidou Centre, the Louvre and a flying visit to the Musee d'Orsay.

Pompidou's management is in direct contrast to that of the Guggenheim. The three top museums are national institutes owned and funded by the French government. They are not reliant on blockbuster exhibits or merchandising and do not have overseas branches like the Guggenheim, which one Pompidou official described as having a "Coca-Cola factory" approach to art.

A Pompidou in Hong Kong would be their first overseas project.

The centre's executive director, Bruno Maquart, said: "It will be our first and last overseas project. We do not want to follow the Guggenheim model."

Despite their diverse background and philosophy, the museums are keen to join the project, because they all want to have a presence in China.

Thomas Krens, who heads the Guggenheim global network of museums, said this when he was in Hong Kong last month to explain the foundation's agreement with Dynamic Star.

During his first encounter with the Hong Kong press on the cultural hub project, Mr Krens said that even though the foundation had worked with mainland museums before, it wanted to have a physical presence in China.

The Pompidou, whose presence in the bid team is supported by the French government, also said it wanted to establish a new Sino-French dialogue on culture by having a museum in Hong Kong, which played a strategic role as "a Chinese city, but not very Chinese".

Both museums agreed that what the government has planned for West Kowloon was a first for the art world and admitted they did not know how or if it would work.

The Pompidou Centre's curator on contemporary arts, Camille Morineau, said: "As far as I know, it is unprecedented. I have never come across a public museum run by private [profit-oriented] enterprises."

Ms Morineau admitted the success of French museums in putting arts and the public interest first was inseparable from the fact that they were national institutions.

She said the problem of a private museum was that it put profit before the art.

"They charge high entrance fees and sell expensive catalogues. They don't run risky shows," she said. "But a public museum dares to take risk. It may not be popular but receives good critiques and when looking back some years later, it can be a very important show for the museum or even for art history."

The massive cultural hub idea is an experiment. No one can tell with certainty whether it can deliver what it has promised and the only thing that they are certain of is that high property development densities will be needed for the project to be attractive to developers and to make the facilities financially sustainable.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2005, 05:05 AM   #197
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Critics decry W Kowloon consultation
Sylvia Hui
16 December 2004
Hong Kong Standard

While Chief Secretary for Administration Donald Tsang insists the government will consider public views on proposals for the West Kowloon cultural hub, lawmakers and architects on Wednesday voiced doubts on whether people could offer meaningful suggestions based on the limited information available to them.

There was also the question of whether the public should be asked to choose one out of only three proposals, or even whether there could be a proper comparison between the three options.

"It's difficult to compare the three options when the components and plot ratios offered are completely different. It's not an easy decision for anyone to make," said Bernard Lim, president- elect of the Hong Kong Institute of Architects.

Democratic Party chairman Lee Wing-tat, who attended yesterday's exhibition, said the public has been denied access to full details of the proposals and will find it hard to make an educated assessment.

"The models are very nice, but a lot of information, including the financial details and the structural questions regarding the canopy, remain unanswered," Lee said.

"This should not be looked at as a beauty pageant. If one cannot make a choice or should one not like any of the choices, one should simply say so in the comment card."

The three bidders' plans are on display at the Special Exhibition Hall in the Science Museum from today until January 31, 2005. The exhibition will then move to the City Hall and continue until March 28.

People will get to register their opinions on five aspects of the three proposals _ canopy design, physical layout and arts facilities.

The consultation ends on March 31.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2005, 05:08 AM   #198
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

'Use single developer or project may die'
Hub could be bogged down for years if no one suitable is found, Tsang warns

Andy Cheng and Chloe Lai
16 December 2004
South China Morning Post

The West Kowloon cultural district project could be aborted if it were not carried out by a single developer, Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen said yesterday.

Speaking ahead of today's start of a 15-week consultation, he rejected suggestions the government should sell land at the site to finance the cultural facilities.

If the project were not entrusted to a single developer, "implementation of the West Kowloon project will be indefinitely delayed, or even die before it is born", he said, as protesters massed outside.

This was because selling the land would take years and the government could not foresee the income from the sales, Mr Tsang said at a ceremony at the Science Museum to launch the project.

"We cannot predict whether the income from selling the land could be injected into the cultural facilities," he told more than 600 guests, including tycoons, legislators and arts and cultural representatives.

He was confident the government could overcome any problems caused by entrusting the project to a single developer.

Some of the tycoons involved in bids for the project meanwhile indicated that a single-developer approach was not the only option. They also expressed flexibility on the density of the development.

Cheung Kong (Holdings) vice-chairman Victor Li Tzar-kuoi said he had an open mind on both issues. Wharf (Holdings) chairman Peter Woo Kwong-ching said it was the government that had decided the project was to be entrusted to a single developer.

Henderson Land vice-chairman Colin Lam Ko-yin said: "We would respect the consensus of the people on single tendering and an extension of the consultation."

Cheung Kong and Sun Hung Kai Properties have formed Dynamic Star International, one of three short-listed bidders. Wharf is involved with Sino Land and Chinese Estates Holdings in Sunny Development, another bidder. A Henderson subsidiary, World City Culture Park, is the third bidder.

Sino Land chairman Robert Ng Chee-siong said Sunny's proposed plot ratio, now 4.3, could be reduced to nearer the government's suggested 1.81.

World City has proposed a plot radio of 2.5, while Mr Li said on Tuesday Dynamic Star's plot ratio - earlier estimated at 3.28, was in fact 1.861. The company said yesterday Mr Li was referring to the residential plot ratio - but material produced by Dynamic Star for the consultation put that figure at 1.68.

Outside the Science Museum, the People's Forum on West Kowloon and the Democratic Party held a protest calling on the government to abandon single tendering.

The project aims at turning the 40 hectares of reclaimed land near Kowloon Station into a cultural hub, housing at least four museums, a theatre complex and a performance venue.

Results of the public consultation are not mentioned as being included in the assessment criteria for bids. But Mr Tsang said the government would take public views into account. Bernard Lim Wan-fung, of the Hong Kong Institute of Architects, said Lord Foster's concept design should be displayed to the public for comparison.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2005, 10:08 AM   #199
bs_lover_boy
POUND THE ALARM!!!
 
bs_lover_boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Hong Kong / Vancouver
Posts: 385
Likes (Received): 12

Just tell the Democratic Party to SHUT UP. This land is empty for more than a decade now and it is just a waste. Just build the damn thing.
__________________
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NIMBY – Not In My Back Yard
YIMBY - Yes In My Back Yard
LULU – Locally Unwanted Land Use.
NOPE – Not On Planet Earth
BANANA – Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anything

Anymore????
bs_lover_boy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2005, 03:44 AM   #200
michal1982
Condom User
 
michal1982's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 712
Likes (Received): 1

i agree!! f***k this democratic losers! and start build!!!
michal1982 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu