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Old February 11th, 2006, 05:55 AM   #261
hkskyline
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South China Morning Post
April 18, 2005
Developers not up to hub job, says Cultural Centre architect
Chloe Lai

The West Kowloon Cultural District should be built by the government rather than private developers, the designer of Hong Kong's first cultural hub believes.

Jose Lei, a retired director of architectural services and chief architect of the Hong Kong Cultural Centre, the Space Museum and Hong Kong Museum of Arts in Tsim Sha Tsui, said the new cultural hub would be more cost-effective if it was handled by the government.

The architect also defended his work in Tsim Sha Tsui, which has been described by artists and politicians as ugly, a blot on the landscape and a big toilet, saying it was a very good piece of architecture.

"The Architectural Services Department can build the cultural hub, it is not a problem," Mr Lei said.

"We are accountable to the public. We use minimum money to maximise resources. We are very good at controlling costs.

"Private architects don't have to take care of the building's maintenance. They just build. But we can maintain whatever we build and it will not be a community burden after completion."

Three private bidders are competing for the 40-hectare West Kowloon project, with the winner awarded the rights to construct and operate the site for 30 years.

"Culture and art is something you can never make self-sufficient," Mr Lei said. "It is a good concept for the government to get somebody to take care of the project and generate enough money to support arts and culture.

"But making it private, you're asking for trouble. Private developers don't consider arts and culture their priority.

"How can the government write the contract to make sure arts and culture will be their priority?"

Mr Lei said he understood why the government wanted to build the cultural hub in West Kowloon.

"It is a vast piece of virgin land where everything can be built easily," he said. "But arts and culture should evolve naturally."

He also said the public exhibition of models of the cultural hub was meaningless.

A model of the cultural centre was on display at City Hall for six months in 1974-75 but the building still stirred controversy after completion.

"People just do not know what they should look at," he said.

Mr Lei said he did not mind the criticism of his works. The Swire Group even suggested recently demolishing the cultural centre and building a new hub there.

"I'm quite happy. Criticism means they are looking at my design," he said. "Swire does not have a mandate on the issue. They just paint a painting, everybody can do that."

He said the cultural centre, arts museum and space museum, which have virtually no windows, were designed for Hong Kong's hot and noisy environment.

He said the extensive use of glass was not suitable for the city.

"The Hong Kong Cultural Centre is environmental friendly. Any use of glass means you allow sunshine and heat to enter, which translates into huge cost for air conditioning and electricity," he said.

"Tsim Sha Tsui is a very busy area and you need a very strong barrier against the noise. The acoustics are very good at the theatre and concert hall in the cultural centre because of the current design.

"I was instructed to build a cultural centre rather than something for people to enjoy the harbour. People go to the toilet and have a drink rather than looking at the harbour during intermission of a concert. In fact, the cultural centre has no dead end and every where is asymmetrical. It is also photogenic from every angle."
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Old February 11th, 2006, 05:57 AM   #262
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South China Morning Post
April 19, 2005
Canopy for project is 'technically feasible'
But a confidential report says there could be problems in other areas

Chloe Lai

The controversial giant canopy designed by Lord Foster for the West Kowloon Cultural District is technically feasible, even though its ownership, management and maintenance could be problematic, a confidential report says.

Amid strong pressure from lawmakers, the government yesterday released the technical report which assessed entries in the cultural hub's design competition in 2001.

It was compiled by a government-appointed technical team to advise the competition's grand jury on different designs.

Lawmakers demanded the report be made public last week after reports claimed the canopy was technically unfeasible, too expensive and difficult to manage.

The technical team divided the 161 entries into three categories, with the jury only needing to consider those falling in the first two. The Foster design was listed in the second category, meaning it had striking features but posed challenges in construction, but the grand jury awarded the design the grand prize. The report also said there could be problems in managing and maintaining the canopy.

The jury also disputed the technical team's assessment.

It said in a written reply to the report: "A large roof is well within the ambit of known technology and experience; and a well-argued case in support of the scheme."

Senior government sources stressed yesterday it was in the second category because the design also involved the construction of a lagoon, which is prohibited under the Harbour Protection Ordinance. The lagoon has already been replaced by a water amphitheatre in the latest design. The sources said the canopy was the "soul of the design" and would not be given up.

The officials said the government would stick to the single-developer approach, emphasising that it was a commitment made by the administration in the project bidding document.

They also stressed the single-developer approach was the best answer to the design, construction and maintenance of the canopy.

"If you look at the design carefully, you'll see it is an integrated design. It makes no sense for cutting it into a number of pieces ... developed by different parties," one official said.

In recent weeks, there have been rumours that the government was considering dropping the canopy and dividing the site into several pieces for different developers.

But the senior officials said the government could adjust the plot ratio for the site. The administration suggested a plot ratio of 1.81 times but all three bidders proposed a much higher population density. The plot ratio is the relationship between developed floor space and the property's site area.

Alan Leong Ka-kit, chairman of the Legco subcommittee on the West Kowloon project, said: "Officials still fail to answer why they have to choose the canopy which was questioned by the technical experts."
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Old February 11th, 2006, 06:52 PM   #263
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South China Morning Post
April 21, 2005
Court challenge 'misconceived'
Jonathan Li

A legal challenge by a little known cultural group to the huge West Kowloon Cultural District project was misconceived, the Court of First Instance heard yesterday.

The group was challenging the makeup of the government-appointed committees responsible for overseeing the implementation of the project.

Government counsel Nicholas Cooney told the court the government opposed the granting of permission for the cultural group to launch a judicial review.

The group, the Association of Chinese Authors and Publishers in Hong Kong and Macau, is questioning the government's decision not to include the Arts Development Council on the project's Steering Committee or Proposal Evaluation Committee.

Mr Cooney said the group had no arguable case.

In its application for mounting a judicial review, the group contended that the Arts Development Council had a legal obligation to serve on both committees.

The group also argued the chief executive had a legal obligation under the Basic Law and the Arts Development Council Ordinance to place representatives on both committees. It was irrational for the Arts Development Council not to be included on the committees, given its role in promoting arts and culture, the group said.

Mr Cooney told the court that while the council had certain obligations under law to promote arts and culture, it ought to have the discretion to decide whether or not to join the committees. It was not stated in the ordinance that the council was obliged to join them.

He said the council could air its views about the cultural project through other channels, such as the public consultation that was now under way.

A solicitor for the Arts Development Council, which was named a co-defendant, was present in court to observe the proceedings.

The court was told that the committees, made up of government officials, were administrative arms of the government. The Proposal Evaluation Committee will assess the bids by private developers, looking at the technical, operational and financial aspects of each proposal. It will then make its recommendation and the final decision on the winning bid rests with the Chief Executive in Council.

Mr Justice Michael Hartmann will hand down his decision on Monday.
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Old February 12th, 2006, 07:56 AM   #264
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South China Morning Post
April 23, 2005
Lawmakers want more hub details
Ambrose Leung

Lawmakers yesterday demanded the government reveal more information about the controversial West Kowloon Cultural District project.

They say documents released this week were inadequate to explain why officials picked Lord Foster's giant canopy design despite a technical panel saying it was problematic.

But in a Legco subcommittee meeting yesterday, Secretary for Housing, Planning and Lands Michael Suen Ming-yeung defended the government's action, saying even though there were problems they could be solved.

Lawmakers were discussing the confidential technical report released by the government under pressure from Legco after news reports revealed part of its content.

But they said what the papers revealed was inadequate in explaining how the final decision was made.

Medical sector legislator Kwok Ka-ki criticised the government for failing to reveal enough information. He put forward a motion demanding more be made public.

"The canopy is not just a concept as it involves $ 7 billion to $ 10 billion. It also guarantees a single-bidder approach and we need to know clearly what principles the government used for choosing to protect the public interest," he said.

Democratic Party chairman Lee Wing-tat accused the government of not studying the design in detail before making the canopy concept mandatory for bidders, despite it being branded as problematic by the technical panel.

But Mr Suen said the technical panel's judgment was not directed at Lord Foster's design but as a general principle, and said technical problems were overcome at later stages of the selection process.

"There were problems, but they could be solved. Life is full of problems and if we just stand there doing nothing, then there would have been no improvements," he said.

The subcommittee passed Dr Kwok's motion demanding that more information be revealed, including detailed discussions of the technical panel about the canopy design, and government feasibility studies and financial reports.

In a 2001 report, the panel of technical experts expressed reservations about the canopy, saying its construction would prevent the breaking of the project into small tenders and that maintenance would be too expensive. The confidential report said the panel short-listed 21 designs, but Lord Foster's was not among them.
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Old February 12th, 2006, 08:02 AM   #265
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
South China Morning Post
April 23, 2005
Lawmakers want more hub details
So do I!
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Old February 12th, 2006, 08:03 AM   #266
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South China Morning Post
April 26, 2005
Request for judicial review is dismissed
Court of First Instance says a cultural group's challenge is misconceived

Jonathan Li

A bid by a little-known cultural group to challenge the West Kowloon Cultural District project was dismissed by the Court of First Instance yesterday, which described the attempt as regrettably misconceived.

The group - the Association of Chinese Authors and Publishers in Hong Kong and Macau - failed to obtain permission to launch a judicial review of the government's decision to exclude the Arts Development Council from two government-appointed committees: the Steering Committee and the Proposal Evaluation Committee, responsible for overseeing the implementation of the multibillion-dollar project.

Mr Justice Michael Hartmann said the Arts Development Council and the chief executive were vested with broad discretion as to how they considered it best to manage the West Kowloon project.

He rejected a contention by the cultural group that the arts council had a legal obligation to attempt to serve on one or both committees, and that the chief executive had an obligation under the Basic Law and the Arts Development Council Ordinance to appoint the council to one or both of the committees.

Mr Justice Hartmann said that with the public consultation now proceeding before the government entered into a contract with the winning bidder, the council could air its views on the project via such consultation, despite not being represented on the committees.

"It is important to understand that the Arts Development Council in not being a member of the committees is not somehow cut off from any involvement in the management and control and future of the West Kowloon Cultural District project," he said.

Neither was the council cut off from any involvement on how the cultural project would come to finality as a concept.

The judge added: "There is nothing to suggest the Arts Development Council has washed its hands of the project".

He also said there was no substance in the suggestion that either the chief executive or the Arts Development Council had acted unreasonably in their decision-making processes.

Mr Justice Hartmann said while it might well have been a wise course for the chief executive to have appointed the council to one or both committees, it was not the function of the court to determine what was essentially an administrative action.

Siu See-kong, a representative for the cultural group, said the group had no plans to appeal.

A solicitor for the Arts Development Council, named as a co-defendant, was in court to observe the proceedings.
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Old February 17th, 2006, 03:37 AM   #267
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South China Morning Post
May 29, 2005
Passing the buck on cultural project
Andy Cheng

Donald Tsang Yam-kuen may pass responsibility for the controversial West Kowloon cultural project to one of his ministers after his expected election as chief executive, according to political analyst Li Pang-kwong of Lingnan University.

He said it would depend on how confident Mr Tsang was about the success of the project.

"If he is not so confident, he will have someone else doing it," Dr Li said, recalling that Mr Tsang had been handed responsibility for the project by former chief executive Tung Chee-hwa.

He said if Mr Tsang ultimately scrapped the much-criticised single-developer approach to the multibillion-dollar development, it would probably be due to pressure from property developers, rather than a case of "Mr Tsang trying to distance himself from Mr Tung".

Anthony Cheung Bing-leung, a professor of public administration at City University of Hong Kong, said Mr Tsang would handle the issue with great care because "he does not want to be attacked at the beginning of his term as the chief executive".

Professor Cheung, who is also chairman of think-tank SynergyNet, expected the West Kowloon project would be an issue during the election for chief executive.

He said public interest would increase when the government disclosed its plan for the development after considering public opinion.

"Reactions will be particularly strong if the public does not agree with the government's summary of their opinions," he warned.

Concern groups are speculating that the government will abandon the single -developer approach, while the giant canopy over the project is likely to go ahead.

Bernard Lim Wan-fung, president of the 2,000-strong Hong Kong Institute of Architects, said the group met Mr Tsang earlier this month.

It was left with the impression that the government was likely to carry on with the expensive canopy scheme.

"But Mr Tsang has made it clear that they will not insist on the single -developer approach if the public is against the idea," said Professor Lim, of the Chinese University.

He said that while the institute was opposed to the single-developer plan, it was not against the canopy.

The institute has suggested that the massive West Kowloon arts district project should be developed in stages in order to better reflect Hong Kong's changing cultural and property needs.

Leung Man-tao, a spokesman for The People's Forum on West Kowloon, said he also expected the government to scrap the single-developer plan because of pressure from property developers.

He said the concern group would organise a public forum next month and ask candidates in the chief executive race to state their views on the cultural project.

Since the public consultation started last December, the West Kowloon project exhibition at the Heritage Museum in Sha Tin has recorded an attendance of about 210,000, with more than 29,000 comment cards submitted.
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Old February 17th, 2006, 11:56 AM   #268
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zzzzzzz.......zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz..........
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Old February 21st, 2006, 05:21 PM   #269
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From news.gov.hk:
Gov't to review cultural project


RTHK news:
Henry Fan: not starting WKCD (West Kowloon Cultural District) afresh 2006-02-21 HKT 17:14

An Executive councillor Henry Fan has defended the government's move, saying it's not starting the project afresh. Rather, he described it as a great opportunity to review terms of the development. Noting none of the three consortium agreed to the government's modified proposals, Mr Fan said it showed that they were financially unviable.

CS says West Kowloon cannot proceed yet

CS says govt plans to relaunch West Kowloon cultural district project 2006-02-21 HKT 21:09

The chief secretary, Rafael Hui, says the government plans to relaunch the project to develop a cultural district in West Kowloon, completely doing away with the so-called single developer approach. The decision effectively puts on hold the controversial development until further consultations are completed in September. Mr Hui said officials would not proceed with invitations for proposals from three consortiums - the so-called IFPs. But he said the move didn't necessarily mean the project would be delayed.
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Old February 23rd, 2006, 03:43 PM   #270
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This is disappointing.
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Old February 24th, 2006, 08:26 AM   #271
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so nothing from the project
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Old February 24th, 2006, 09:27 AM   #272
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It is much better to review the WKCD and establish the WKCD Authority for taking the opinions from all the public at the first stage, as it is a really large project after the Airport construction.
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Old February 25th, 2006, 01:44 PM   #273
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What happened! waste time and money on the project.
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Old February 25th, 2006, 03:47 PM   #274
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lol
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Old February 25th, 2006, 05:30 PM   #275
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In front of central district, wow. It will be look great!
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Old March 4th, 2006, 01:18 PM   #276
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Norman Foster's Canopy Scrapped in Hong Kong


March 1, 2006


Norman Foster’s giant glass canopy roof for the Hong Kong government's $5 billion West Kowloon Cultural Complex (WKCC) has been scrapped.The centerpiece of the project was first proposed in 1999 and has been mired in controversy ever since. It failed to win public support and interest from the three shortlisted developers.

Foster's 390-foot-high, undulating glass roof was to cover at least 55 percent of the complex’s 100-acre site, and was estimated to cost more than $500 million. It was criticized in a recent public review as ”expensive and environmentally unfriendly”. The public also raised concerns about putting all of the project’s arts facilities, including four major museums, under one roof, and awarding the whole site to a single developer to build all at once. The WKCC was also to include theaters, other performance venues like an amphitheater and open piazzas.

The government responded by revising its requirements back in October 2005, so that the winning developer could only build on half the site and was required to pay $3.87 billion upfront. This caused all three developers to withdraw in mid-February. The government has since insisted the project will go forward eventually and will review these issues by September 2006.

Shirley Chang

Souce : http://archrecord.construction.com/news/daily/
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Old March 4th, 2006, 06:22 PM   #277
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OPINION : Drop homes from West Kowloon
1 March 2006
South China Morning Post

The demise of the West Kowloon canopy ("The roof caves in on culture hub dream", February 22) is not a surprise, but a relief to those who are concerned about Hong Kong's future.

Both the government and the Legislative Council undoubtedly have gained popularity for the wisdom in this decision. But they will become even more popular if the government is willing to make two more concessions to the rethought "five basic concepts" for the development of the West Kowloon Cultural District.

First, drop the "residential element" from the first concept. It is out of place with the other elements: cultural, artistic, entertainment and commercial. Allowing a few residential buildings for the elite in the cultural district is a total misfit and will disrupt harmony in the community. As the recent harbour-business survey has shown, 88 per cent of the people are calling for more green space and sensitive development of the harbourfront.

The second concept, public-private partnership - which the government said it was still studying - is regarded by the public as collusion in disguise. It is only right for the government to abandon this concept in view of the overwhelming preference for a cultural green park. This means no participation by property developers. An example of how this partnership can fail is the new airport exhibition halls, which are riddled with problems.

By the same token, the government's reaffirmation of "partnership-building" in concept five is also out of place. It is impossible to envisage how to persuade the few profit-oriented developers not to maximise profits, since none has been known to be generous in the support of our art and culture communities.

Who will enforce the agreement? The chairman of the future Culture and Parks Authority must not be the chief secretary, whose appointment is short term and political. We need someone with experience and capability in management, vision and passion in art and culture, as well as concern for the legacy of Hong Kong.

Property prices at West Kowloon are already rising following the demise of the giant canopy. If the government confirms that the cultural-district land is not for sale, the developers' target will shift elsewhere, such as Kai Tak, which is ideally located for a high-class residential centre.

We appeal to the government to start planning and building the West Kowloon Cultural Green Park now.

K. N. WAI for Hong Kong Alternatives
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Old March 4th, 2006, 06:23 PM   #278
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A chance to get things right on West Kowloon
24 February 2006
South China Morning Post

The government's decision to go back to the drawing board with plans for an iconic cultural district in West Kowloon provides a welcome opportunity for a rethink on the project.

It is most unfortunate that so much time and money has been wasted on a bidding process that was controversial from the start. Plans for the arts hub were announced in 1998. Six years of work has gone into planning the project, both by the government and interested developers. Now, the process must start all over again.

The ambitious plan to build a stunning waterside development with a unique design and top-class cultural facilities is a good one. And it appeared to enjoy public support. But the way the government went about implementing the proposals was seriously flawed. Lessons should be learned. Few people knew how the plan, including the single developer approach, came to take shape.

There was a failure to adequately consult the Executive and Legislative Councils. And when the public was finally asked for its opinions at the end of 2004, the most important decisions had already been taken. The project was dogged by a suspicion that the government was lining up a sweetheart deal for what would become a lucrative property development.

Amendments were made to the plans in an attempt to reflect public opinion. But these did not find favour with the three shortlisted bidders. Rather than continue the negotiations, the government decided to start again.

There is now an opportunity to do things the right way. Chief Secretary Rafael Hui Si-yan has announced that a consultative committee will be set up to review arrangements for the core arts and cultural elements, including financing, and will report to Legco.

That is a step in the right direction. The community should have significant representation on the committee, along with the arts and cultural sector. This time, the process should be conducted from the bottom up. And the government should keep an open mind.

One perception that has been created by the decision is that Chief Executive Tsang Yam-kuen wanted to ensure the controversial West Kowloon issue did not interfere with his expected bid for a second term next year. If that is true, he is walking a political tightrope.

When Mr Tsang came into office, he promised strong governance - an ability to get things done. But in the past two months, government plans on two of the toughest tasks he faces have stalled. His political reform package was voted down by the Legislative Council in December. Mr Tsang then put the issue on the back-burner. A potential stumbling block for his campaign had been removed. The arts hub decision sidelines another.

Legco had published a report highly critical of the project and the way the government had handled the proposed development of this valuable waterfront site. Developers not on the shortlist to bid for the project were unhappy. Those on the shortlist baulked at the amended version of the plan that dropped the single developer approach and revised the way the project was to be funded and built. The controversy could have erupted again just in time for next year's election.

But if Mr Tsang has pulled the project to remove a controversial issue ahead of his expected re-election bid, such a move might backfire. After his promises of strong government, people will have expected him to have achieved something concrete during his first - admittedly short - term. It is not enough for him just to sit back and ride on the coattails of the recovering economy.

The suggestion by Mr Hui to suggest that the decision to pull the West Kowloon plans was itself an example of strong government was most unconvincing.

But there is now a chance for the government to put things right - by working with the community to make the best possible use of this valuable asset in West Kowloon.
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Old March 4th, 2006, 10:31 PM   #279
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I think that this parcel of Land will be left empty for 100 years at least!!!
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Old March 25th, 2006, 06:27 AM   #280
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Change of art
Frustrated by the lack of arts education in Hong Kong, some schools and groups have taken on the job of stirring students' creative juices, says Carrie Chan
23 March 2006
South China Morning Post

ART PLAYS A big role at Ling Liang Church Sau Tak Primary School. This year, primary four to six students at the Tung Chung school have turned to aquariums to get their creative juices flowing. The results - images of crabs created with computer graphics or engraved on clay plates - are now on display in its foyer for all to enjoy.

"We wanted to start with the environment," says art teacher Chan Kwok-tung. "There can be so many elements taken from living creatures. It's something authentic and tangible, so students have a strong sense of attachment."

Ling Liang is one of a small but growing number of schools bypassing the government curriculum in favour of their own arts programme.

According to the chairman of the Hong Kong Society for Education in Art, Victor Lai Ming-hoi, schools have stepped up their arts activities to raise their profiles and competitiveness. "With all the talk of West Kowloon and more arts groups emerging, principals know that art is recognised as an economic activity," he says.

An increasing number of arts teachers - especially those trained at the Hong Kong Institute of Education - are finding official guidelines on teaching arts ineffective.

The trend coincides with the furore over the West Kowloon Cultural District proposal. Arts advocates have called on the government to help promote appreciation of all things cultural. After all, what's the point of investing hundreds of millions to build world-class facilities and stage international productions when there's a limited audience to appreciate them?

Attendance at stage productions, concerts, dance performances and museums is relatively low in Hong Kong. This is due to a combination of factors: a money-orientated local culture, a dearth of venues and, more fundamentally, an absence of a comprehensive art education policy at school level.

As a result, many youngsters - and their parents - have little interest in either visual or performing arts. Few take arts-related subjects in public examinations. Just 6,449 students sat for the Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination in visual art last year, and that number dropped to 167 for Advanced Level exams. The numbers were even lower for music students: 266 and 26, respectively.

Art lovers say that such education should not be just about passing exams - it should arouse students' awareness and interest in the subject.

The Education and Manpower Bureau (EMB) introduced a new set of curriculum guidelines in 2003, in line with the drive to promote creative industries.

Vanessa Li Lok-wa, a curriculum development officer at the bureau, says the new curriculum is focused on cultivating students' ability to analyse art and appreciate it rather than just create it. "Critique of visual culture has been incorporated into art classes for the first time," Li says.

For instance, the curriculum also calls for students to be encouraged to interpret the concept of cubism and apply it in a still-life painting. Hence the switch from "art and design" as a subject to "visual arts" from primary one to form three. Schools are also encouraged to expose students to other art forms such as drama, film and new media.

But these remain merely suggestions. None is binding, and few schools have adopted the guidelines, art educators say.

"My approach to arts education has been taught at the Institute of Education," Chan says. "But the old generation of teachers and principals have yet to catch up with the new curriculum."

Primary schools devote only about 10-15 per cent of classroom hours to art education. At junior secondary levels that drops to about 8-10 per cent. This amounts to about two 40-minute lessons in visual arts each week.

Chan tries to expose his students to a wide array of topics such as three-dimensional media, print-making, design and visual culture. But he's luckier than many teachers bogged down by paperwork and other teaching duties - his principal spared him from teaching mathematics this year.

Tang Fung-yu, an art teacher at a Mui Wo secondary school, says effective implementation of the new curriculum depends largely on motivated principals. And there's no continuity at the secondary level, with arts classes ending after form three, teachers say.

The situation may improve in 2009. As part of secondary school reforms, all form four to form seven students are encouraged to attend at least two art sessions every week. The classes should cover not only visual arts, but also music, drama and new media. But again, it's up to schools whether they embrace these reform guidelines.

Partly to compensate for the neglect, independent and government-subsidised arts groups are organising arts activities for students during or outside school hours.

Since 2001, the School Culture Day Scheme, organised by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department, has introduced youngsters to programmes run by performing arts groups, libraries and museums. This year, more than 300 primary, secondary and special schools have applied for the scheme, which covers 700 activities such as Cantonese opera appreciation.

Under the department's School Art Animateur Scheme, arts practitioners are also invited to conduct year-long projects with schools. Groups taking part include the City Contemporary Dance Company, the Hong Kong Ballet, Prospects Theatre and Zuni Icosahedron.

"We've worked closely with the EMB on this programme as they help us to liaise with schools and publicise our activities," says Vivian Yeung Wing-kam, a senior manager at the department's Cultural Presentation Unit.

Meanwhile, rather than rely on the education authorities for pointers, the Hong Kong Society for Education in Art is taking the initiative to link arts educators with the community. "We hope to group together schools in the same district to organise exhibitions and performances," Lai says. "We need to step outside the classroom."

Additional reporting by Kevin Kwong
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