daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 27th, 2006, 05:05 PM   #281
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Winds of cultural change blow
Leslie Kwoh
27 March 2006
Hong Kong Standard

Sunday's rain and winds had many Hong Kongers running for cover but they failed to deter the more than 100 politicians and activists who attended an outdoor forum to share their visions for the government's suspended West Kowloon Cultural District project.

"I'm quite pleased with the turnout, and there was a lot of diversity in the ideas," said Wan Chai District Council chairman Ada Wong, who is also a core member of the People's Panel, which organized the "Reinvent West Kowloon" workshop.

"This is the first step, to allow everyone to contribute their ideas. Next, we will discuss more in-depth which options are actually feasible."

Some participants suggested building attractions with children's themes such as Ferris wheels, puppet galleries and go-kart tracks.

Others recommended paying more attention to landscaping details such as public furniture, artistic sculptures and fountains.

In general, participants agreed most of the site should be devoted to the creation of a green park, supplemented by low-density recreational and cultural facilities such as museums, bookstores, theaters and art galleries.

The government's original plans, scrapped late last month because the three short-listed developers failed to respond positively to the modified development parameters and conditions set out last October, included an elaborate 40-story tall glass canopy over the area.

"This is the first time I have visited the site, but my suggestion is to keep it simple," said Mau Chi-wang, also a core member of the panel.

"I recently came back from Sydney and I think we should build a big opera house or museum next to a large garden. I think the garden would help the public feel at ease."

Incidentally, Sydney, famed for its Opera House, recently scrapped plans to build another iconic monument in favor of creating an 11-hectare headland park, which would restore public access to the waterfront at Millers Point for the first time in nearly 100 years.

Participants at the forum also expressed concern about the government's apparent eagerness to rush the project into completion.

"Where else in Hong Kong can you sit outside like this and enjoy a view of the harbor?" said Paul Zimmerman, convenor of Designing Hong Kong Harbour District, who suggested starting off with a green park and then "filling in bit by bit."

Vice president of the Hong Kong Institute of Architects Vincent Ng agreed, insisting that from an architect's point of of view a gradual approach would be more practical.

"The market for arts and culture in Hong Kong is not that big, so I suggest going slowly so we don't overbuild the area," he said.

Funding for the project, originally estimated to cost HK$40 billion, could be aided by inviting the public to donate benches, fountains and public furniture, suggested one woman, who preferred to remain anonymous.

Home Affairs Bureau principal assistant secretary Vincent Fong said he would do his best to "play a listening role" and bring back any "interesting ideas" to the government.

He also admitted that while the government's proposals were "not perfect," they were backed by rationale.

The government has announced it will set up a consultative committee to gather expert views and public opinions. However, the start date has yet to be announced.

The People's Panel plans to continue collecting public input, which it intends to compile into a report and present to the government in September.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 27th, 2006, 10:47 PM   #282
philip
The Picture Guy
 
philip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 568
Likes (Received): 71

Why not put some green lawn on this parcel of land while we wait for a development decision.
At least it will look nice and green !

And the green lawn can be reused in the new park when they finally build it.
__________________
I am the Picture Guy - A picture is worth a thousand words.

Last edited by philip; March 27th, 2006 at 10:55 PM.
philip no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 31st, 2006, 02:05 AM   #283
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Ditching hub plan 'strong governance'
Carrie Chan
Hong Kong Standard
Friday, March 31, 2006

The chief executive has admitted for the first time the decision to scrap the West Kowloon cultural district project last month was a painful one.

"This was a project that was close to my heart. To decide whether or not to start afresh was truly a difficult choice," Donald Tsang said Thursday.

He said many people considered the decision to scrap the project as a setback for the government. But Tsang said it was the result of strong governance.

"The government must change with the times, but when and how the government should intervene requires social consensus. To reach such a consensus, the government must be responsive to public views," Tsang said.

"Strong governance, therefore, is not an end in itself but the means to achieve the goal of people-based governance. We should have the courage to review and rectify our decisions, and this in itself demonstrates our commitment to `people-based government.'

"Strong governance is a culture of governance based on public views and effective execution. The government will make no empty promises, provoke no meaningless argument and set no unrealistic goal."

Tsang defined strong governance.

"In my 30-odd years as a civil servant, I have always undertaken my daily duties with prudence. I try to be resolute, courageous, pragmatic, honest and open, setting a good example in promoting this culture of effective execution."

Tsang also called for a harmonious interdependent relationship between the executive and legislative branches of government.

"The government is not omnipotent but it is our faith in a small but strong and effective government that allows us to rise up to challenges, and to operate with transparency and provide an effective response at crucial times. We cannot expect to draw up the perfect blueprint for strong governance behind closed doors.

"Policy visions can be strengthened with the full input of views from our legislative councillors and the community as a whole. It is this kind of governance that will have a popular mandate."

Tsang went on: "I pointed out that `together we stand, divided we fall' after I was sworn in last June.

"If there are constant disagreements between the executive and the legislature, this will only lead to ineffective governance, and will be detrimental to the overall interests of the community."

Tsang responded for the first time to the issue raised by two senior officials that Hong Kong could become marginalized by the rapid infrastructural developments in the mainland.

He agreed that while economic development in the Pearl River Delta could have some effect, Hong Kong had the strength and the wherewithal to overcome them.

Tsang said he would pay four visits this year to the Pearl River Delta to explore further trade opportunities.

He also announced that a public consultation on enhanced functions of the district councils for the management of some district facilities is expected to commence by mid-year, the same time a public consultation on the overhaul of the political appointment system will commence.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 31st, 2006, 06:24 PM   #284
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

K Wah eyes mega hub site
31 March 2006
Hong Kong Standard

K Wah International Holdings, which expects soon to have about HK$8 billion to spend on replenishing its land holdings, would be interested in buying parts of the West Kowloon cultural district project site if they became available, according to company officials.

"If the government breaks up the West Kowloon cultural district project site, we would definitely be interested in it," said Francis Lui, vice-chairman of K Wah Group.

K Wah has HK$1.8 billion capital available for use, with a further HK$6 billion expected from the sale of residential units this year. "We have lots of capital to replenish our land bank," Lui said.

The company, whose present holdings in Hong Kong include sites in Sha Tin, Wan Chai and East Shui Fai Terrace in the Mid-Levels, is eyeing the government's land application list.

"The government has lots of land for sale," Alexander Lui, managing director of K Wah Real Estates, said. "We hope to make good use of it."

In China, K Wah has more than two million square meters of land bank at present, with 725,000 sq m in Shanghai, and 1.4 million sq m in Guangzhou, and could increase its mainland land bank. Since the company is more familiar with Shanghai and Guangzhou, it prefers to focus on these two cities, Francis Lui said.

K Wah's full-year net profit grew more than 14 times to HK$3.64 billion in 2005, compared with HK$241 million 12 months earlier, due to a HK$3.55 billion gain from the deemed disposal of shares in Galaxy Entertainment Group. Turnover declined 31 percent to HK$289 million from HK$418 million in the previous year.

Galaxy Entertainment Group initiated placements of new shares in April and July last year to raise capital for acquiring Galaxy Casino, which led to a dilution in K Wah's shareholding and contributed to a one-time profit.

The profit was hurt on two fronts. In Hong Kong, rising interest rates led to stagnation in the local property market, while in Shanghai, sales were slowed by Chinese government measures to curb rising property prices, limiting the number of units sold.

"Since last month, we have seen a significant increase in transactions in the Shanghai market, and prices seem to be making a comeback," Francis Lui said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 4th, 2006, 05:14 PM   #285
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Activists hail rethink on cultural district
4 April 2006
South China Morning Post

Harbourfront activists have won a small victory from the government on the controversial West Kowloon Cultural District. It has decided to keep cultural facilities separate from commercial aspects of the development.

Buried in the government's response to a series of answers to the Legislative Council's committee on the arts hub is the revelation that it intends to establish a separate body to control the cultural elements of the project.

The government says it still intends to use a private-public partnership approach to develop and operate the arts facilities to "positively address the concerns of artists".

"We wish to provide more choices for artists as well as the public, tap innovation and creativity from the private sector and inject different management expertise into the arts and cultural venues in a flexible way," the paper says.

"This is in line with the principle of fostering diversity and pluralism underlying our cultural policy."

Ada Wong Ying-kay, a member of the People's Panel on West Kowloon, said the government should have "seen sense from the start" and kept the two parts of the development separate.

"We are obviously delighted but it's important to note that construction would have started on the hub if they had made this decision in 2002," Ms Wong said.

Harbour activist Paul Zimmerman also said the decision was a step in the right direction for the fledgling development.

In the paper, the government also says it has an "open mind" about funding community aspects of the development.

It lists three possible approaches:

The conventional approach where the design, construction, maintenance and operation of the facilities are publicly funded;

An arrangement under which land is allocated to the statutory body set up for the project, with such a body responsible for the construction and operation of the facilities involved; and

A combination of the two approaches.

The government announced in February that it was reconsidering plans for the development, which has been plagued with controversy since it was announced in 1998.

The decision came after developers said they were not interested in pursuing the project under the funding arrangements proposed and a Legislative Council subcommittee called for an overhaul of the project's planning and finances.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 6th, 2006, 02:13 AM   #286
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

New panel on cultural hub begins to take shape
6 April 2006
South China Morning Post

Members of the new consultative committee on the West Kowloon Cultural District project are likely to be announced this week.

The panel, headed by Chief Secretary Rafael Hui Si-yan, will comprise three subcommittees chaired by Executive Council members.

The culture and tourism subcommittee would be headed by Selina Chow Liang Shuk-yee, the museum subcommittee by Victor Lo Chung-wing, and the financial subcommittee by Marvin Cheung Kin-tung, a government source said. The subcommittees would be made up of "well-recognised people from the arts and cultural sector, and the travel industry", the source said.

Travel Industry Council executive director Joseph Tung Yao-chung, theatre director Edward Lam Yik-wah, theatre group Zuni Icosahedron founder Danny Yung Ning-tsun and Spring-Time Production chief executive officer Clifton Ko Chi-sum have accepted invitations to sit on the culture and tourism subcommittee.

Mr Ko - also a member of the tourism, culture and sports sub-group of the Hong Kong Tourism Board, and the Committee on Performing Arts - said facilities should give priority to local audiences.

"We should not focus on the preferences of tourists," he said. "Rather, we must develop what local people can share and enjoy. Tourists are looking for authentic experiences and they are most interested in what local people like."

The consultative committee is expected to hold its first meeting in the middle of this month.

A Legislative Council subcommittee meeting on the project will be held today. Items for discussion will include the government decision to keep cultural facilities separate from commercial aspects of the development.

Two of the three former shortlisted bidders for the project supported the government's decision, while Henderson Land said it was too early to comment.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 6th, 2006, 09:40 AM   #287
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

From news.gov.hk:
WKCD advisory group members named
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 7th, 2006, 04:59 PM   #288
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Tien warns of culture hub danger
Michael Ng
7 April 2006
Hong Kong Standard

Liberal Party chairman James Tien has warned the government against giving a West Kowloon cultural district managing board too much power as this could result in the return to a single- developer approach.

In addition, several legislators said the absence of opposition representatives in the West Kowloon cultural district consultative committee announced Thursday will make future consultations pointless.

The government had earlier named the members of a 15-strong Consultative Committee on the Core Arts and Cultural Facilities of the West Kowloon Cultural District and its three affiliated advisory groups.

The committee's main task is to re- examine the need for the core arts and cultural facilities for the project.

Both Secretary for Home Affairs Patrick Ho and Secretary for Housing, Planning and Lands Michael Suen said the government is still adopting an open attitude on the development mode as well as the role of the WKCD managing board in developing the district.

But Suen's deputy, Rita Lau, said the government will not rule out the possibility of allocating the entire 40-hectare site to the board _ as was the case with the Hong Kong Airport Authority.

However, Tien feared that this could easily result in the project reverting to the controversial single-developer approach. ``If the statutory body can make its own decisions, it will surely choose to manage all the land area and seek a public-private partnership for the project,'' Tien said.

``Should this happen, it will become just another single-developer approach, or a tendering exercise which will solely be available to a few large developers.''

Tien said the Airport Authority, which was given total power to manage Hong Kong International Airport, was able to bypass the Legislative Council as it did not require approval to build the Asiaworld Expo and other hotel facilities in the vicinity of the airport.

But Suen immediately clarified that Lau was merely citing an option and the government currently had no fixed plan.

``It is just one of the possible options, and not the only option or our preferred option,'' Suen said.

The committee, chaired by Chief Secretary for Administration Rafael Hui, and the three advisory groups comprise representatives from a wide range of arts and cultural sectors, including drama and theater, contemporary dance, philharmonic, Chinese opera, ballet and Cantopop.

Three Executive Council members _ Selina Chow, Victor Lo and Marvin Cheung _ will also serve as committee members and will respectively chair the three advisory groups _ performing arts and tourism; museums; and financial matters.

Radical legislator Leung Kwok- hung criticized the absence of opposition voices in the new committee. Frontier legislator Emily Lau also doubted whether the arts sector could accept the committee members, most of whom are not elected legislators.

But Ho defended the appointees, saying they possessed substantial experience and credibility in their fields.

Chow pledged to conduct seminars to solicit the public's views during the consultative process.

Legco WKCD subcommittee chairman Alan Leong, of the Civic Party, hoped the committee could work with transparency, but reserved comment on its representativeness.

The committee will report its findings to the government in September.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 9th, 2006, 07:55 PM   #289
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Getting it right on West Kowloon
9 April 2006
South China Morning Post

Chief Secretary Rafael Hui Si-yan put on a brave face when he announced a fundamental rethink of the West Kowloon Cultural District project in late February. He denied the project would have to start from scratch, and maintained that a relaunch would in fact speed up the construction of the cultural complex.

He explained that a review of the arts and cultural facilities by a consultative committee he chaired would provide greater flexibility and scope for the building and financing of the complex.

Speaking during Legislative Council question time last week, Chief Executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen dismissed claims that a rethink of the project was a setback for strong governance.

"It is widely known that the West Kowloon project is one closest to my heart. To start afresh on this landmark project was a truly difficult choice. However, it is exactly because of the project's far-reaching implications that extra prudence is called for.

"We should have the courage to review and rectify our decisions; and this in itself demonstrates our commitment to 'people-based government'."

Mr Tsang's admission of failure - in seeking public support for the single-developer model - has set the stage for taking the cultural complex back to the drawing board.

On Thursday, the government announced the formation of a consultative committee, chaired by Mr Hui, and three related subcommittees. The subcommittees, led by three unofficial members of the Executive Council, will look into different aspects - performing arts and tourism, museums and finance.

More importantly, movers and shakers from the arts and culture circles and financial experts have a heavy presence on the four committees. Notably absent are the developers. Political parties and legislators have only a marginal presence.

If last week's announcement has not caused a stir, it is because the credentials and backgrounds of the government appointees have silenced the critics and the sceptics.

Ordinary people are comfortable leaving the planning and development of the cultural hub to the experts as long as the project does not become - or is perceived as - yet another giveaway to property giants.

With the wisdom of hindsight, it is clear that the government had seriously underestimated the depth of the concern in society about collusion with developers.

However committed and entrepreneurial the three short-listed developers may have been, the public did not trust that they had the right mindset and expertise to promote arts and culture.

It was only in February - almost 30 months after it invited participants to bid under the single-developer model in September 2003 - that the government began to face the reality that the project was heading for a Titanic-like end if it stuck to its course.

It now sounds irrelevant and futile to ask whether the government had consulted the same batch of arts and cultural experts before 2003 and, if it did not, why not.

One is also tempted to consider whether policymakers may have been blinded by intellectual arrogance, the imperative of administrative convenience or a feeling of paranoia about dealing with Legco.

Judging from the memberships of the official think-tanks on West Kowloon, it is clear Mr Hui understands the utmost importance of getting it right from the start and rebuilding public trust in the decision-making process.

The simple truth is that members of the arts and culture sector will be both the experts on and the users of the West Kowloon Cultural District.

Securing their participation will be crucial in seeking consensus in society on contentious issues that may arise on the future of West Kowloon and the broader issue of cultural development.

With the new bodies named, West Kowloon is open for a rethink on facilities, new ideas and visionary planning for what could be the most exciting project and the one closest to the hearts of everyone who calls Hong Kong home.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 10th, 2006, 06:07 PM   #290
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Advisers bid to broaden themes for cultural hub
10 April 2006
South China Morning Post

The government should look beyond its "preferred features" in setting themes for museums in the West Kowloon cultural project, according to members of a newly established advisory group.

Ada Wong Ying-kay, a member of the Consultative Committee on West Kowloon Cultural District, said the government should consider the museums' themes holistically rather than being bound by its preferred features.

In announcing a revamp of the controversial project, the government has insisted on retaining the four themes of moving image, modern art, ink and design.

Despite the government's insistence, themes will now be discussed by the Consultative Committee's advisory group on museum facilities, headed by Executive Councillor Victor Lo Chung-wing.

"This is not a matter of how many museums we [will] have, but what cultural identities the museums are going to present," Ms Wong said. "Should we limit ourselves only to the four themes put forward by the government? These themes were suggested a few years ago and they could be obsolete now because the art and cultural scene is forever vibrant and moving."

Another member of the group, Fringe Club director Benny Chia Chun-heng, also hoped the committee would review the government's four preferred themes for museums.

He believed that the West Kowloon project could benefit museums outside the cultural district by enlivening Hong Kong's cultural landscape.

Film critic Peter Tsi Ka-kei, who is not on the board, supported a museum of moving images in Hong Kong, saying that this would appeal to overseas visitors.

"Many overseas visitors are fascinated with film culture in Hong Kong," said Mr Tsi, who is now executive director of the Hong Kong International Film Festival. "Movies can represent Hong Kong culture in a lively way," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 11th, 2006, 06:18 PM   #291
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Even though the cultural district is back on the drawing board, there is still a waterfront promenade that is open to the public. Go and enjoy the skyline!

More photos : http://www.globalphotos.org/hk-tstnight.htm









__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 16th, 2006, 06:47 PM   #292
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Private sponsorship of the arts should be encouraged
13 April 2006
South China Morning Post

Hong Kong's image as a business centre powered by a relentless drive for profits is one that fails to give due recognition to our lively arts scene. Nor does it recognise the flows of public, and increasingly private, money that sustains such vibrancy. Now, a $36 million donation by Swire Pacific to the Hong Kong Philharmonic has helped put business sponsorship of the arts in focus.

For years, the major performing arts groups have relied on the government for the bulk of their funding. In 2004-05, 10 such groups received a total of $230.65 million through the Leisure and Cultural Services Department and Arts Development Council. The Hong Kong Phil was the largest beneficiary, receiving $59.08 million. But there have long been suggestions that established arts groups should learn to stand on their own feet, so public money could go to budding ones with more dire needs for financial assistance.

Indeed, that is the direction Hong Kong should be heading, according to a consultation paper published by the Committee on Performing Arts in November. With a low-tax regime, this city does not have a massive capacity for public funding for the arts. Increasing community support and corporate sponsorship has to be the way to go, it says.

Hong Kong has no lack of billionaires, but Swire Pacific's sizeable contribution is an exception rather than the rule. An explicit aim of the government's original plan for the West Kowloon cultural complex was to encourage business investment in the arts. Now that the plan has gone back to the drawing board, the future of business support for the arts has become blurred. Arguably, despite a renewed emphasis on public sector involvement, a new development model for the project could still include built-in features to promote business sponsorship.

While private money interfering with artistic integrity is always a concern, government meddling in freedom of artistic expression by manipulating public grants would be even worse. In this connection, a proposal by the Committee on Performing Arts to set up a non-governmental body to disburse such grants according to objective criteria is welcomed.

To help established arts groups wean off their dependency on public funding, the government should devise measures to encourage private sponsorship. As a start, a matching grants scheme, where the government would match every dollar of donation obtained by arts groups, might be the catalyst that would prompt the likes of Swire Pacific to dig deep into their pockets. Public grants should not be abolished, but be reduced slowly.

In many developed countries, notably the United States, private support for the arts is a well-entrenched tradition. Many arts groups thrive on a combination of sponsorship, grants, bequests, investment income, membership fees and ticket sales. That should also be Hong Kong's long-term vision.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2006, 07:12 PM   #293
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

RTHK news:
New consultative group expects to submit West Kowloon plan by end of year 2006-04-21 HKT 15:45

The new consultative committee on the West Kowloon cultural district plans to submit a concrete proposal to the chief executive by the end of the year. And to help it on its way, it will organise several open forums next month to collect public views. The panel was set up after the government scrapped its original plans for the West Kowloon district.
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 24th, 2006, 06:49 PM   #294
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

RTHK News:
Permanent home for Cantonese Opera in west Kowloon yet to be decided
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2006, 01:39 AM   #295
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Funds committee spearheads revival of cultural hub project
Jonathan Cheng
29 April 2006
Hong Kong Standard

The government has made another step towards resuscitating its beleaguered West Kowloon cultural district, with a financial subcommittee kicking off six- month-long discussions Friday that will help determine the bankrolling of the mega project.

In six months, the 15-member Financial Matters Advisory Group will submit its funding recommendations for the project to the West Kowloon Consultative Committee, headed by Chief Secretary Rafael Hui Si-yan.

That consultative committee met Friday last week to revive plans for the ambitious HK$40 billion cultural hub, which came to an abrupt halt in February when the three competing developers pulled out, apparently miffed by the government's changing conditions and requirements.

The cultural hub project had faced a firestorm of criticism from a number of legislators and nongovernment organizations, which were angered by the government's alleged failure to consider public views on the project.

The scrapping of the plans in February was seen as a major blow to the administration, which had made the cultural hub a centerpiece of its tenure.

But even then, Hui had promised to get the project back on its feet as soon as possible.

One of the biggest controversies of the original scheme was the funding of the project, which had been structured to come entirely from the private sector _ thereby avoiding the need to win a budget approval from Legislative Council.

This time around, the financial subcommittee will consider different funding models for the development and operation of the project, including the use of public funds and several possible models for a public-private partnership, according to subcommittee chairman Marvin Cheung Kin-tung.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2006, 06:54 PM   #296
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Funds committee spearheads revival of cultural hub project
Jonathan Cheng
29 April 2006
Hong Kong Standard

The government has made another step towards resuscitating its beleaguered West Kowloon cultural district, with a financial subcommittee kicking off six- month-long discussions Friday that will help determine the bankrolling of the mega project.

In six months, the 15-member Financial Matters Advisory Group will submit its funding recommendations for the project to the West Kowloon Consultative Committee, headed by Chief Secretary Rafael Hui Si-yan.

That consultative committee met Friday last week to revive plans for the ambitious HK$40 billion cultural hub, which came to an abrupt halt in February when the three competing developers pulled out, apparently miffed by the government's changing conditions and requirements.

The cultural hub project had faced a firestorm of criticism from a number of legislators and nongovernment organizations, which were angered by the government's alleged failure to consider public views on the project.

The scrapping of the plans in February was seen as a major blow to the administration, which had made the cultural hub a centerpiece of its tenure.

But even then, Hui had promised to get the project back on its feet as soon as possible.

One of the biggest controversies of the original scheme was the funding of the project, which had been structured to come entirely from the private sector _ thereby avoiding the need to win a budget approval from Legislative Council.

This time around, the financial subcommittee will consider different funding models for the development and operation of the project, including the use of public funds and several possible models for a public-private partnership, according to subcommittee chairman Marvin Cheung Kin-tung.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2006, 05:58 PM   #297
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

From news.gov.hk:
5 join Cantonese opera committee
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2006, 03:05 PM   #298
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Arts hub plan outdated, says adviser
The needs of today were not clear 10 years ago: Selina Chow

5 May 2006
South China Morning Post

Changes are inevitable in the art and culture venues planned for West Kowloon, says the head of a group advising the government on the facilities.

The requirements spelled out in the original plan were not necessarily the best options, Tourism Board chairwoman Selina Chow Liang Shuk-yee said.

The cultural district should be developed in phases and could be scaled back, she said.

"We did not see the needs of today 10 years ago when we planned the project," Mrs Chow said. "Art and cultural development is dynamic. It is inevitable that those facilities should be developed in phases to allow enough flexibility and space for expansion and fine-tuning."

Mrs Chow heads an advisory group on tourism and cultural facilities, one of three set up under the 67-person committee headed by Chief Secretary Rafael Hui Si-yan to consider the future of the West Kowloon development.

The others are examining museums and the financial aspects of the project.

The original plan required the 40-hectare district to feature three theatres with total seating capacity of at least 3,200, a performance venue offering more than 10,000 seats, four museums spanning a total net floor area of at least 75,000 square metres, and a 10,000 square metre arts exhibition centre.

"Different groups need different types of performing venue," Mrs Chow said. "The entertainment sector needs a stadium with more than 10,000 seats, but theatre groups prefer smaller venues with fewer than 1,700 seats.

"For sure, there will be changes in the core art and cultural facilities, but the changes won't be too radical. For example, there may still be a 10,000-seat stadium but its gross floor area may be diminished. There may also be more small venues."

Along with the arts and culture facilities, Mrs Chow said restaurants and bars and residential developments would become an integral part of the project.

"Visitors [won't] go to the district just for museums or theatres. They will also look for a place to eat and relax with a glass of wine after the show," she said.

While leaders of the city's arts and cultural sector - who have long criticised the project as too rigid and have called for a comprehensive arts policy first - are likely to welcome a more flexible approach, there was a warning yesterday that it could deter investors.

"The investment costs of hotels and shopping malls are covered by rental income," said the former chairman of the Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors, Cheung Tat-tong. "People-flow and the environment will be among the major factors affecting rental value."

He said the simple solution would be to return to the traditional approach of land sales, but this might not be cost-effective. "The government is in a dilemma."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2006, 03:06 PM   #299
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Opera groups plead for funding and facilities
8 May 2006
South China Morning Post

Cantonese opera groups will meet the convenor of the advisory group for the tourism and performing arts facilities of the West Kowloon cultural district project tomorrow to discuss concerns over funding and facilities for training and performances.

Since the list of members of Selina Chow Liang Shuk-yee's advisory group was announced last month, Cantonese opera groups have complained about under-representation in the project.

The 18-member advisory group is part of the 67-strong consultative committee headed by Chief Secretary Rafael Hui Si-yan to rethink the West Kowloon development.

There is only one Cantonese opera representative in Mrs Chow's group, Stephen Chow Chun-kay, the Cantonese Opera Advisory Committee chairman, who has never worked in the field.The government had announced the addition of Cantonese opera experts to the committee, but Dr Chow remains chairman, despite criticism of his professional knowledge.

Chan Kim-sing, chairwoman of the Chinese Artists Association of Hong Kong, said they did not have high expectations that their voices would be heard at tomorrow's meeting.

"We have been talking about the same issues for years," Ms Chan said. "We have been unable to compete with government-subsidised art groups in renting venues for training or performance because of funding."

For example, the association has to offer night-time lessons at the squash courts beside a park in Shamshuipo. There are no mirrors or iron bars for stretching exercises, and about 40 students, mostly female, have expressed concerns for their safety because the area is isolated.

"We need proper places for our students, and our audiences," Ms Chan said.

Mrs Chow said the opera groups should not use her advisory group to air their grievances with the government's policies.

"We have always recognised the importance of Cantonese opera to the arts and cultural development of Hong Kong," Mrs Chow said. "However, we are not in the position to change any government policies which may have affected the development of Cantonese opera.

"We have already understood the needs and concerns of Cantonese opera [within the West Kowloon project], and we will try to cater for them."

She said that a statutory authority, which would be established to oversee the project's operation, should be responsible for the selection of content.

"Such decisions can't be made by a government department because it has its hands tied with rules and policies ... It can't apply any commercial or artistic judgment," she said.

"The [statutory] authority should be artistically accountable. Sometimes you have to stick your neck out and make decisions which may not seem commercially sound."

The advisory group is to report to the chief executive by the end of this year.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 25th, 2006, 10:19 AM   #300
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

From news.gov.hk:
Public invited to cultural project forums
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu