daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 5th, 2011, 06:40 AM   #781
Travis007
Registered User
 
Travis007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 4,064
Likes (Received): 63

This plan looks great. West Kowloon is truly going to be a destination. I lived in one of the buildings beside ICC for a month and right now apart from mainly tourists and residents upstairs, Elements isn't really a spot to be for many people yet. This area will look really different when I return to HK in a few years with this and the Shenzhen express rail complete.
__________________
Flickr
Travis007 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 5th, 2011, 08:26 PM   #782
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Landmarks in every corner of the world
5 March 2011
SCMP

Norman Foster, the 75-year-old British architect, has designed some of the most renowned landmarks around the world.

In Hong Kong, the HSBC headquarters building and the Chek Lap Kok International Airport bear his signature.

So do the restored Reichstag in Berlin, the redesigned Hearst Tower in New York City and the futuristic Expo MRT station in Singapore.

He is no stranger to the West Kowloon Cultural District.

In 2002, Foster triumphed in an earlier design competition for the site with a plan for an enormous canopy covering 55 per cent of the development area.

But the canopy concept sparked concerns over maintenance costs. The idea of a single developer getting the whole project and the plan's high-density development also met strong resistance. The government scrapped the whole plan and started all over.

The prolific architect refused to give up on the chance to shape the city's waterfront and Hong Kong's arts scene. He came up with a whole new plan, dubbed City Park, calling for a huge urban park with 5,000 trees to be planted on the west of the site, almost half the area.

His design also highlighted zero-carbon ideas such as recycling waste to create energy and renewable energy generation.

The plan took hits from the Hong Kong Institute of Urban Design, which was set up by outspoken and influential architects, planners and engineers.

"We see no passion," Professor Bernard Lim Wan-fung, the institute's president, said in November. If we have to oust one from the competition, it would be Foster's."

Ivan Ho Man-yiu, a member of the institute's council, added at the time that the plan failed to offer a cultural identity.

"We see only a commercial site plus a park, things that are already built in London, Manhattan and Chicago ... Do we still want a city without character? We have already lived with it for the past few decades,"

Foster defended his plan in an interview in December.

"The park is absolutely unique to Hong Kong," the Briton said. `It uses the species you find in the countryside around Hong Kong. And it's unique because of the waterfront setting.

"We've shown how we understood the DNA of Hong Kong ... We've made an extension of the city in which all the activities are all very close to each other," he added.

Foster left school at 16 to do his national service with the Royal Air Force. His relentless passion and energy propelled him into the architectural stratosphere by the mid-1980s. He has won countless awards and was honoured with a life peerage in 1999.

Foster and Partners employs 1,000 architects working on an enormous number of projects: universities, skyscrapers, hospitals, museums, schools, production plants and entire city centres, stretching from Argentina and Brazil to Mumbai and Beijing, via London, Germany, Istanbul and the Middle East.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 5th, 2011, 09:29 PM   #783
EricIsHim
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,397
Likes (Received): 28

All these architects and planners are yelling at the Foster and Partners design has no soul, not creative enough, doesn't reflect the local cultures etc. etc. I wonder what can they come up with for the WKCD if they were the designers.
__________________
EricIsHim
My PhotoBucket
EricIsHim no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 6th, 2011, 05:33 AM   #784
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

I've always thought the whole process was wrong to begin with. Start with what facilities are needed, then run the grand design, not the other way around.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2011, 04:43 AM   #785
aab7772003
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 773
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
I've always thought the whole process was wrong to begin with. Start with what facilities are needed, then run the grand design, not the other way around.
Building an iconic global landmark for nothing if ever possible as a way to establish a world-class art scene overnight, in a city when people are so deprived of breathing and living space and artists so starved of opportunities, is simply too tall an order.
aab7772003 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2011, 10:07 PM   #786
g.yau
Registered User
 
g.yau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: London
Posts: 24
Likes (Received): 8

Changes to the design?

I was looking at the recent images for the project and found two small changes and it was the design of the opera house (I think it's the opera house, the one on the right) and the ribbon structure
They changed the shape and design of the opera house, from round to an elongated triangle. The ribbons seems to have extended to other parts of the site.
Before:


After:


Even though I prefer this design over the other proposed ones, I do wish that Foster would remove some of the buildings in the neighbourhood i.e. the ones blocking the West kowloon train terminus view from the harbour. A fantastic train terminus ruined by the buildings blocking the view of the harbour
g.yau no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 10th, 2011, 12:17 PM   #787
pookgai
Registered User
 
pookgai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 389
Likes (Received): 23

Has the design been confirmed now?
pookgai no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 10th, 2011, 03:06 PM   #788
aab7772003
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 773
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by pookgai View Post
Has the design been confirmed now?
All the hooplas up to this very minute are about coming up with a masterplan, rather than the definitive designs of any landmark buildings.
aab7772003 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2011, 08:57 AM   #789
caelus
Registered User
 
caelus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 323
Likes (Received): 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by g.yau View Post
Even though I prefer this design over the other proposed ones, I do wish that Foster would remove some of the buildings in the neighbourhood i.e. the ones blocking the West kowloon train terminus view from the harbour. A fantastic train terminus ruined by the buildings blocking the view of the harbour
I believe those will be residential buildings, not likely to be removed
caelus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2011, 09:34 PM   #790
aab7772003
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 773
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by caelus View Post
I believe those will be residential buildings, not likely to be removed
It is like that they will be "affordable" housing as touted!
aab7772003 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2011, 04:30 AM   #791
JPBrazil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Belo Horizonte
Posts: 5,655
Likes (Received): 37

I thought that OMA's project had won the competition...
JPBrazil no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2011, 01:55 PM   #792
Rachmaninov
Registered User
 
Rachmaninov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
Posts: 3,188
Likes (Received): 24

No, OMA didn't win, thank God!
__________________
Rachmaninov no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2011, 01:57 PM   #793
spicytimothy
...::HK.:.:.:.LA::...
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Hong Kong / Los Angeles
Posts: 1,527
Likes (Received): 7

The park portion looks slightly bigger than Kowloon Park, so if Kowloon Park is any indication then I'm not interested in the "city" park that's even further from the city.
__________________
"Image Is Just Your Imagination. Reality Is Rarely Revealed."
spicytimothy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2011, 11:45 AM   #794
DiscoZimpy
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 45
Likes (Received): 0

In this cluster of venues and open space, long-term commercial, community and cultural partnerships will encourage a lively arts scene for generations to come.
DiscoZimpy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2011, 12:12 PM   #795
Rachmaninov
Registered User
 
Rachmaninov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
Posts: 3,188
Likes (Received): 24

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiscoZimpy View Post
In this cluster of venues and open space, long-term commercial, community and cultural partnerships will encourage a lively arts scene for generations to come.
wtf this guy is googling and copying phrases from other websites...?? This sentence appeared 6 years ago on this HK government page mentioning the OLD proposal!!

http://www.hab.gov.hk/wkcd/ifp/eng/p...tion/intro.htm
__________________
Rachmaninov no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2011, 06:12 PM   #796
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Ex-head of arts hub sorry for abrupt exit
12 March 2011
SCMP

Graham Sheffield has apologised for causing "concern and controversy" over his abrupt departure from the West Kowloon Cultural District project and swift re-emergence as an arts executive in Britain.

And the arts authority, releasing fresh details about the former chief executive's vanishing act, said it would impose more safeguards when hiring the next arts hub chief.

"I am sorry that my departure and subsequent appointment at the British Council has caused concern and controversy. That was absolutely not my intention," Sheffield said in a long-awaited statement released yesterday through the arts hub. "I will start work with the British Council in May, after two more months of rest and more than four months after ... leaving Hong Kong. I believe I have behaved with integrity and regard for due process at all times."

The authority said Sheffield did not breach his employment contract, since a clause preventing him taking up related work for six months only applied to working in Hong Kong.

Asked whether Sheffield's actions were morally wrong, the chairman of arts hub board's remuneration committee, Sin Chung-kai, said: "Everyone who's been following this already has an answer ... there's a lot to learn from this lesson."

According to an account offered by the authority, the chronology of events was as follows:

On December 16, Sheffield tendered his resignation letter dated December 15, in which he said he was willing to serve the three months' notice required. The board asked him to reconsider the resignation and expected another round of discussion when he returned from his Christmas break in January.

"Unfortunately I became extremely unwell during my time in Hong Kong and I finally resigned in mid-December," Sheffield said.

Authority insiders previously said that Sheffield was unwell towards the end of his tenure, showing a terrible lack of sleep at meetings. Previously, board members said Sheffield was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, but the authority said he declined to make his health condition known to the public.

On December 22, the authority received an e-mail from Sheffield's doctor, who recommended he stay in London. On December 29, Sheffield e-mailed the board to say his doctor insisted he "should not travel back to Hong Kong at all. If I have to go for a few days, I should under no circumstances go there alone."

The board agreed to Sheffield's resignation on January 5 and two days later, an official announcement was made. "The board was ... compassionate about my health situation and, in the circumstances, did not require me to work through my notice period," Sheffield said. More medical statements were received later.

It was announced on February 24 that Sheffield had been appointed as the British Council's director for the arts and would start work in May.

The British Council's chief executive, Martin Davidson, who was in Hong Kong yesterday, said a headhunter got in touch with Sheffield only on January 4, after he had resigned from the Hong Kong post.

Sin said that Sheffield stated his new salary was "substantially less" than he earned in Hong Kong.

Sin said the authority had received 40 applications for the job and had discussed with the headhunter the possibility of introducing other elements into candidate interviews, such as an assessment test.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 18th, 2011, 05:42 PM   #797
Herzarsen
Herzarsen
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 396
Likes (Received): 64

Extreme Makeover

HONG KONG NEWSMARCH 18, 2011, 3:41 A.M. ET

A rendering of the West Kowloon Cultural District.

Earlier this month, Hong Kong's Chief Secretary Henry Tang finally named Britain's Foster + Partners as the winning master-plan designer of the US$2.8 billion West Kowloon Cultural District. The announcement was a milestone, but hardly the final step in a long process that will unfold over the next two decades.

The selection came after 13 years of public debate, hundreds of presentations, thousands of committee meetings, the resignations of a couple of high-profile executives, and tens of millions of dollars in billable hours and preproject funding. Sir Norman Foster's firm beat out two other finalists, Rem Koolhaas's Office for Metropolitan Architecture and the local practice Rocco Design Architects.

See Photos:
http://blogs.wsj.com/hong-kong/2011/...tab/slideshow/

See renderings of the three proposed designs for the West Kowloon Cultural District, including the winning one by Norman Foster.

Standing at a podium making the announcement, Mr. Tang, who is also chairman of the West Kowloon Cultural District Authority, said: "The public's voice now is loud and clear: 'Move on and get the job done.'"

Once it is complete—assuming there are no more major hitches—the project could demonstrate that with enough money and effort, a city can create a globally relevant culture scene from scratch.

"Hong Kong needs this. We need it as we are looking for our own identity and our future," says Andrew Lam, an urban planner and member of the West Kowloon Cultural District Authority board.

An arts hub the likes of West Kowloon Cultural District is the current must-have for many growing cities. It stems from the thinking that for a city to be an attractive location—for living, working and visiting—it needs a thriving and dynamic cultural scene.

"The cultural arts hub is on every major city's list of key interests," says Carolyn Cartier, a professor of cultural globalization and China studies at the University of Technology, Sydney. "It has become understood that creative industries—encompassing everything from design, architecture, software and theater—are essential for urban growth." She says the idea has spread around the world as city mayors share policy information and attend the same conferences.

In China, every major city seems to be sprouting an arts district. Just a few hours by train from Hong Kong, for instance, vast culture zones in Guangzhou's Zhujiang New Town and Shenzhen's Baoan have emerged in the past five years. Further north, Shanghai has an arts development in Pudong on the drawing board, and Beijing has plans to build three major museums close to the National Stadium, known as the Bird's Nest. Meanwhile, South Korea plans to pour $10 billion into its Seoul Creative City and Abu Dhabi will spend $27 billion on a cultural hub on Saadiyat Island, which will include a sister museum to the Louvre in Paris.

All of these projects—many of which are complete or nearly complete—came along after Hong Kong's plan for a West Kowloon Cultural District was first announced.

Introduced in a 1998 policy speech by former Hong Kong Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa, the Cultural District was meant to transform the city into a world-class arts destination.

The project to convert 40 hectares of reclaimed land was initially awarded to Mr. Foster in 2001, based on his proposal for a giant glass canopy over the site, which sits near the Elements mall in western Kowloon. But that decision was overturned in 2005 after a public outcry, played out in the local media, over the government's essentially handing over prime real estate to a single developer. After a series of consultations, the Hong Kong government ordered a new round of bidding in 2009.

Meanwhile, as governments in post-credit crunch Europe and the U.S. slashed their arts and culture budgets, the city set aside a whopping $2.8 billion endowment to pay for the mammoth cultural project. Each of the three finalist architectural firms was given $5.1 million to pitch its master plan, a huge sum for such a competition.

Says Prof. Cartier, who has studied Hong Kong's struggles with West Kowloon: "The debate over West Kowloon has been successful in some ways so far because it led to the realization that you can't just build a set of several boxy museums, have limited collections with which to fill them, and then call the buildings a cultural center."

Indeed, recent history has shown that pouring money into a large construction project doesn't guarantee results: In the late 1990s, for instance, several cities across Asia—Hong Kong included—aspired to create their own versions of Silicon Valley. Kuala Lumpur had its $20 billion Multimedia Super Corridor; Phuket laid out plans for a Greater Phuket Digital Paradise; and let's not forget Hong Kong's $2 billion Cyberport. Today, the Super Corridor is anything but, and Cyberport is primarily a residential development.

Foster + Partners's winning design for the West Kowloon Cultural District, in keeping with the government brief, will offer 17 cultural venues—including an opera house and a 15,000-seat outdoor arena—plus extensive arts-education facilities and commercial areas. A waterside public park will take up nearly half the land of the district and an underground transport network is supposed to be environmentally friendly.

The crown jewel will be the M+ Museum, a contemporary art museum that the government expects will attract two million visitors a year, the same number that New York's Museum of Modern Art draws. The city has granted M+ $128 million to acquire artwork and $600 million to build the museum's 7,200-square-meter space.

Of course, with such an ambitious blueprint, the completion of the district is decades away: According to the plans, the first phase of the West Kowloon district should open by 2015; the final phase will be finished in 2031. However, Colin Ward, the Hong Kong-based Foster + Partners architect heading the project, says that government rules permitting, some events, such as tree plantings and pop-up exhibits, may roll out soon. M+ executive director Lars Nittve intends to start doing pop-up shows as soon as next January.

But Hong Kong culture critic and art curator Oscar Ho, who also teaches culture studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and is a member of the West Kowloon Cultural District consultation panel, says he thinks the choice of Foster + Partners as the master-plan designer was too conservative.

"It's always the 'no surprise, not challenging one' that wins," says Mr. Ho. "Art is about being unusual and risky, but obviously not for WKCD. The nice thing about Foster's design is, if things do get messed up, at least we will still have a park."

Most Hong Kong residents, adds Mr. Ho, don't care about or want the project. He interviewed about a hundred residents of Yaumatei district, which borders the project site, and more than 70% said West Kowloon had nothing to do with them.

"Some of the most expensive luxurious apartments are [near the Cultural District]. But across a main street on the other side is one of the poorest districts in Hong Kong. How would [the cultural district] be meaningful to the poor community?…WKCD will be dead if there isn't a strong local presence that speaks to the people," says Mr. Ho.

In some ways, although the decision to use Foster + Partners's master plan marks significant progress in the West Kowloon Cultural District process, it is just the start of more rounds of public consultations this summer. The earliest that construction bids on key Cultural District structures such as M+ can begin is the end of this year.

One upside to the West Kowloon Cultural District process is that it has energized local arts groups and brought a fresh wave of international star architects, culture theorists and urban planners to Hong Kong.

A few days before the master plan was awarded, Mr. Koolhaas said: "Whatever happens, Hong Kong is a lifetime commitment. West Kowloon has helped us understand the city better." Despite losing out on West Kowloon, his firm's work in the city continues—the MTR Corp., the territory's mass-transit rail operator, has hired OMA to redesign its train stations.

Foster + Partners, which has long ties to the city—it designed Chep Lap Kok airport and HSBC's headquarters—is helping to convert part of the old Kai Tak Airport into a cruise-ship terminal.

Mr. Yim's firm, a hometown favorite, is building the new Hong Kong government headquarters and the East Kowloon performing-arts center.

Redesigning Hong Kong's future continues.

Source: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...415935630.html
Herzarsen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2011, 06:56 PM   #798
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

No restraint on former WKCDA head taking jobs outside the city
12 March 2011
China Daily - Hong Kong Edition

The West Kowloon Cultural District Authority (WKCDA) has denied that Graham Sheffield, former chief executive officer of the arts hub, breached a contracted six-month employment prohibition by taking up a new position with the British Council on Feb 25.

Sheffield himself issued a statement Friday through the WKCDA, claiming he only started job-hunting after the resignation.

In response to public concern raised after Sheffield accepted a job offer so soon after resigning his Hong Kong post, Sin Chung-kai, chairman of the Remuneration Committee of the WKCDA, said at a media conference on Friday that the restriction applied only to employment within Hong Kong.

The authority has no intention of make changes to the restriction clause in future contracts, and believes it's a resonable stipulation, Sin said.

He also stressed the board meeting's decision on Jan 7 to release Sheffield from his duty and excute his three-month notice was based on the information available at that time, the knowlege of Sheffield's health, and more importantly, the three letters of medical advice from his doctor.

He said that it was "an arrangement on the departure of a patient".

Sin said he asked Sheffield, when contacting him during the past two weeks, whether he could reveal the state of his health, but Sheffield declined.

He said it's possible that the immense pressure of the job touched off Sheffield's health problem.

He said the authority had considered changing current structure by creating a post of chief operating officer or deputy CEO. But the former CEO left before any actual change could be made.

Sin, however, admitted the indicent was a lesson. He said the authority will recruit more prudently.

But he didn't answer directly, when sked whether he considers Sheffield as an honest employee.

Chief Executive of the British Council Martin Davidson on Friday defended Sheffield, saying he accepted his new position after he resigned in Hong Kong.

A statement issued by the British Council two weeks ago indicated that Sheffield was appointed as the new director of arts of the United Kingdom's international cultural relations organization.

He will take up the post at the beginning of May.

The new job requires him to work both in the UK and overseas.

The controversy arose because Sheffiield accepted the new offer, only two months after resigning from the WKCDA citing "health reasons," only five months after taking office.

He submitted the resignation on Dec 15, 2010, and officially left the position on Jan 7.

The WKCDA had to pay him the salary for the last month of the probation, or about HK$290,000, according to his contract.

Davidson of the British Council on Friday clarified that Sheffield was only "formally approached" by the headhunters on Jan 4, "which was after his resignation from West Kowloon", and that he became a potential candidate for the new job on Jan 18, "which was after his resignation being accepted by West Kowloon".

Chief Secretary Henry Tang, also chairman of the WKCDA board, said on the day after Sheffield's new job was unveiled that the government will look into whether Sheffield had breached some clauses in his contract that prohibits him to be employed at a similar organization within six months after resignation.

Sheffield's predecessor, former Hong Kong Disneyland executive Angus Cheng Siu-chuen, quit after a week on the job citing "personal reasons".
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2011, 10:43 AM   #799
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Time to foster art for art's sake
The Standard
Monday, March 21, 2011

The results are out. Foster and Partners has officially won the commission to come up with the master plan for the West Kowloon Cultural District.

A long and difficult journey has just begun - both for the architects and residents of the city.

The whole hub, from the conceptual phase, to the open competition for individual spaces, to the actual construction of the buildings will probably take a whole decade to come to fruition.

But now seems a good time for all of us to put aside our emotions and start the real planning of the software, and not just the hardware, of the West Kowloon Cultural District.

Simply focusing on the latter demonstrates a myopic vision, one that the government is often accused of having.

Although the past 10 years have seen a steady increase in the number of art lovers, it still remains a tightly knit circle of connoisseurs while the majority of locals could at best be described as passive art admirers.

It is a common perception that art is still the preserve of auction houses and Western galleries.

A case in point is the overwhelming majority of participants at Art HK and other similar biennials of strictly Western origin.

To be able to play host to a true arts hub, Hong Kong needs a strong and knowledgeable local community well versed in the arts.

The government should consider supporting and channeling funds into educational and sponsorship programs that reach out to emerging talents and grassroot projects.

Earmarking resources to promote culture should just not be about building an icon or creating a cathedral for art.

Why? Because the glue that binds the scheme together is not the architecture, but artists and the audience.

If American architect Louis Sullivan was alive, I am sure he would agree with us when we say: Form follows function and function follows demand. Hong Kong Art Vanguard Association members - architect Nicholas Ho and art historian Stephanie Poon - don't always see eye to eye.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 23rd, 2011, 09:04 PM   #800
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

By 淮海陳 from a Chinese photography forum :

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu