daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old February 16th, 2014, 02:32 PM   #861
TohrAlkimista
Registered User
 
TohrAlkimista's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Milano
Posts: 13,171
Likes (Received): 886

I really hope that whenever in the future they will plan to re-design, renovate or even demolish and rebuild the actual ferry terminal.
__________________
TohrFlickr
||| ||| |||
36 Hours in Milan
TohrAlkimista no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 21st, 2014, 05:20 PM   #862
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Bringing a Flagship of Contemporary Art to Hong Kong
21 March 2014
The New York Times

HONG KONG -- Lee Kit, an artist in Hong Kong, watched as his works were installed this month at the Cattle Depot, an abattoir-turned-artists' commune.

''You,'' an adaptation of his solo show at the Venice Biennale, is a quiet reflection on daily life: a video of hands sorting cutlery, a faded sun chair, an old T-shirt. It is also one of the many pop-up exhibits organized by M+, the planned museum for the West Kowloon Cultural District, an enormous and long-delayed government project budgeted to cost 21.6 billion Hong Kong dollars, or about $2.8 billion.

''I'm pretty happy they chose me,'' Mr. Lee said shyly.

M+'s budding curatorial team is faced with two daunting tasks: It has to assemble a major collection and has to engage the public through temporary offerings, years before the museum building is completed.

Workers are expected to break ground in August, with a planned completion date of 2017. In the meantime, M+ will use a smaller waterfront pavilion that should be finished by next year for its show, ''Right Is Wrong -- Chinese Contemporary Art 1975 to Now.''

Lars Nittve, M+'s executive director and a founding director of the Tate Modern, is no stranger to new museums, but even he said that starting a collection from scratch was ''rather unusual.''

''The Tate Modern was born out of the Tate Gallery, so it has a history of over 100 years,'' he said. ''Most museums, whether private or public, start with some sort of collection, something from an original donor.''

Doryun Chong, who began work as M+'s chief curator less than a year ago, acknowledged that it was ''very rare for any curator to have the opportunity to build an institution from the ground up.'' He added, ''That's exactly why I took this job.''

The Korean-born Mr. Chong was with the Museum of Modern Art in New York. ''I'm used to working in a well-oiled machine like the MoMA,'' he said. ''It's different here -- everything is new.''

When Mr. Nittve began work in 2011, the museum's collection did not have so much as a pencil doodle. The first thing Mr. Nittve did was court Uli Sigg, a former Swiss diplomat and an important private collector of contemporary Chinese art. The lobbying paid off in 2012, when Mr. Sigg donated 1,463 works worth 1.3 billion Hong Kong dollars, or about $165 million, according to estimates from Sotheby's. M+ topped that with a purchase of an additional 47 pieces.

Mr. Sigg was vocal about choosing Hong Kong because he wanted the works to stay on Chinese soil, but he was concerned about censorship at mainland institutions. His collection included one of Ai Weiwei's ''Tiananmen'' photos, which shows the artist's middle finger raised in front of the Beijing square.

M+ now has 2,784 pieces and shows no sign of slowing down or bending to government critics who have questioned its more politically charged choices.

The museum will also become home to almost 100 photos from Liu Heung Shing's ''China After Mao'' series. Some of these document the deadly 1989 crackdown on student protesters in Beijing; one graphic image shows bloodied bodies being rushed to the hospital. For now, the collection is mostly focused on greater China or the Chinese diaspora.

Last May, when art world luminaries flocked to the first Art Basel Hong Kong, M+ announced that it had acquired the complete editions of Tehching Hsieh's performance art from 1978 to 1999. It makes up the most comprehensive collection of the New York-based Taiwanese artist's work by a public institution. This January, the Chinese collector Guan Yi donated 37 contemporary works, including ''Canton Express'' from the 2003 Venice Biennale.

The curatorial team's next goal will be to reach out to the rest of Asia.

''We're spending more time on Taiwan, Korea and Japan, partly because Japan has a long history of important avant-garde movements,'' Mr. Nittve said. ''But as our team grows, we will look toward Southeast and South Asia.''

Mr. Chong said the fact that Japanese and Korean museums had done a good job in preserving modern works boded well for the region, but maybe not so well for a new museum. ''This is particularly true of Asian works from the early 20th century,'' he said. ''When you see major works already on a museum wall, you know you can't collect them. Museums almost never sell their collections, unless something catastrophic has happened.''

''In some ways, South and Southeast Asian art may be more accessible to us because of a lack of a strong history of institutional collecting,'' he added. ''But we haven't done much work there yet. We are very new at this.''

M+ will show not only art, but also what it calls ''20th- and 21st-century visual culture,'' including disciplines as wide-ranging as film and design.

Earlier this year, M+ used an art space called ArtisTree to showcase about 100 models, photos and drawings from its growing architecture collection, which spans the 1920s to the present day.

On M+'s long to-do list is the development of its ''moving images'' collection, which is still lacking a curator.

''Our collection could include movies -- Hong Kong cinema is a classic -- but also video games, graphic design or computer design,'' Mr. Nittve said.

One advantage of starting with a clean slate is that the M+ collection can address historic imbalances.

''We've been struck that the Sigg collection is very male-dominated,'' Mr. Nittve said of the major donation of Chinese works. ''There is an over-representation of male artists and an under-representation of female artists of standing. I think we need to keep an eye on this and not end up in the same situation as many Western museums.''

M+ is being built in a city whose art scene only began attracting international attention several years ago. Much effort has been made to include local artists.

Last year, M+'s directors visited Blindspot, a small gallery that was showing Stanley Wong, a Hong Kong designer and artist also known as anothermountainman.

They bought 10 works from his ''Lanwei'' photo series for an undisclosed sum, while the artist donated an additional 36 works so the show could be kept together. This was Mr. Wong's first gift to any museum, which he says he plans on following up with more donations.

''Lanwei'' documents unfinished or abandoned building projects from across Asia, which Mr. Wong spent six years tracking down across 12 cities.

''These 'lanwei' buildings are actually a bit dangerous -- holes in the floors, no walls, no elevators, no windows,'' he said. ''There I am, lugging 30, 40 pounds of equipment up the stairs. There I am, squatting on some industrial estate sidewalk trying to manipulate film in a cloth bag.''

''A 'lanwei' building in Asia says something about the issues in this region, like overinvestment or corruption,'' he said. ''I photographed an enormous road built outside Bangkok's new airport that had never been used.''

Mr. Wong said he was not overly concerned by the delays and budgetary squabbles that have beset the West Kowloon project.

''West Kowloon has been called a white elephant, and there have been criticisms of whether it is the best use of government money,'' Mr. Wong added. ''But if we are going to be committed to making this into a cultural city, we need something like this.''
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2014, 04:43 PM   #863
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Neon signs focus of online art exhibition
21 March 2014
The Standard

Hong Kong's ubiquitous neon signs will be the focus of an online exhibition to run from today by M+, the future museum of visual culture in the West Kowloon Cultural District.

Mobile M+: NEONSIGNS.HK'' will feature a crowd-sourced Neon Map through which the public will be invited to post images and stories, via Instagram, e-mail and the NEONSIGNS.HK website (www.neonsigns.hk), of neon signs from throughout Hong Kong.

These will be posted on the Neon Map, searchable by district and featured sections.

The online exhibition will be active until June 30.

It has been launched following the recent acquisition by M+ of two iconic neon signs: the neon cow that hung above the Sammy's Kitchen in Sai Ying Pun since 1977, and a Kai Kee Mahjong School rooster sign, dating from 1976, from that company's now-shuttered branch in Kwun Tong.

``M+ plans to continue to acquire important Hong Kong neon signs that would otherwise be discarded, and NEONSIGNS.HK is an effort to document the remaining examples in the city while researching neon signs as a rich topic for exploration in the field of visual culture,'' theWest Kowloon Cultural District Authority said yesterday.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2014, 10:38 AM   #864
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807


西九申請放寬樓面面積高度
2014年3月29日 (六)

Synopsis :
- Town Planning Board requested to increase the GFA and height limits of the West Kowloon Cultural District.
- GFA 740,000 sq m increase to 850,000 sq m
- height limits increase by 5-14m
- purpose to increase food, retail, and entertainment facilities to offset losses from the cultural facilities



從海港城望向西九,放寬高度限制的前後比較。(電腦模擬圖) Before (top) and after (bottom)

【本報訊】西九文化區向城市規劃委員會申請放寬總樓面面積及高度限制,西九管理局指此舉對營運文化區有幫助,但民政事務局常任秘書長楊立門指,提高發展密度亦未必可以解決西九的財政問題。

未必紓解財政問題

西九擬放寬總樓面面積百分之十五,由現時七十四萬平方米調高至八十五萬平方米,建築物高度則增加五至十四米不等。西九項目推展行政總監陳文偉昨在立法會監察西九小組委員會上稱,西九完成評估後,認為放寬總樓面面積技術上可行,不會造成不可克服的影響。

西九行政總裁連納智未有回應新增樓面面積的成本和帶來的收益,只說可以提供更多餐飲、零售和娛樂設施,對營運文化區有幫助。楊立門則稱,此舉目的在於善用土地,但文化藝術設施不太賺錢,即使提高發展密度,亦未必可以解決西九的財政問題。有議員擔心西九文藝設施空間不足,建議將部分商住用地撥作文藝用途,楊立門回應稱,新增的樓面面積已可滿足不同表演的需求。
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2014, 08:07 PM   #865
kunming tiger
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: kunming
Posts: 7,029
Likes (Received): 1658

Then they are planning a commercial area under the WKCD as I alluded to before. Well that's good news lets hope it gets the green light.
kunming tiger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2014, 06:04 PM   #866
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Rail delay rocks culture hub plan
17 April 2014
South China Morning Post

Long-awaited West Kowloon arts hub likely to be hit by challenging geological conditions affecting work on HK$67b rail line’s terminus

Delays in completing the high-speed railway to Guangzhou will hinder the progress of the West Kowloon Cultural District, where the line terminates, although how big an effect it will have remained unclear yesterday.

It is understood that the Centre for Contemporary Performance and the Medium Theatre II, which will sit atop the railway’s lavish terminus, could be directly affected by complex geological conditions at the site.

The impact on other facilities of the two-year delay – which will push the HK$67 billion railway line’s opening back to 2017 – is uncertain.

Disclosing the delay on Tuesday, the MTR Corporation cited the breakdown of a tunnelling machine at Yuen Long as the main problem.

But MTR projects director Chew Tai-chong also said that underground rock strata at the terminus were at a level higher than expected and would therefore take longer to excavate. Progress was also slowed by boulders and uncharted utilities.

The performance centre was expected to be completed after 2018 as part of the second batch of facilities to open at the long-delayed cultural hub. Other facilities due to be ready in the same period include the Lyric Theatre and Medium Theatre I.

The delay is the second setback for the culture hub in a year. In June, Chief Secretary Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor said the completion of some facilities, including the performance centre, would be held up by a lack of funds.

The centre comprises three performance spaces with different designs and equipment, with 150, 250 and 400 seats. It is designed for dance, theatrical and multimedia performances.

It is understood that M+, the museum of visual culture due to open in 2017, should not be affected as it is above the existing Airport Express tunnel.

The MTR said it had been communicating with the cultural district authority and would hand the terminus site back to it once railway construction was completed. “At this stage, we can’t see any delay in that,” a spokeswoman said.

A spokeswoman for the cultural district authority said it would work with the MTR and the government to assess the impact of the railway delay on its plans.

Construction of the first building in the district – the Xiqu Centre for Chinese Opera – started in September, 15 years after the project was first proposed. It is due to be completed by 2016.

In June, Lam said the arts hub would include more flats and offices to avoid the need for more government funding as costs rose to more than HK$47 billion. She said there would be deviations from the master plan by British architect Norman Foster.

The idea of building a cluster of state-of-the-art performance venues on reclaimed land at West Kowloon was first touted in 1998.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2014, 06:49 PM   #867
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

West Kowloon Cultural District needs to develop a 'human side': expert
10 June 2014
South China Morning Post

Arts figures called yesterday for a long-term plan to develop the human side - or "software" - of the West Kowloon arts hub after hearing that the lack of such a plan is hampering the huge project.

But the arts hub management said that besides events and programmes, long-term software development would require broader cultural policy planning involving the government.

This emerged as members of the Legislative Council subcommittee monitoring the project were being briefed on progress yesterday.

West Kowloon Cultural District Authority board member Danny Yung wrote that the arts hub could be the missing piece in a grander scheme of making Hong Kong a cultural metropolis.

But Yung, co-artistic director of theatre group Zuni Icosahedron, said it lacked a blueprint connecting it with the rest of the city's cultural infrastructure, including arts funding and education.

"The current budget does not include software development. And what is West Kowloon's role in Hong Kong's cultural development in the long run? Is it only a venue operator?" asked researcher Leung Wai-sze.

Arts hub management had earlier outlined the plans for venues in the first two phases to be ready by 2020.

These included the live-performance venue Freespace, the Xiqu Centre for Chinese opera, visual culture museum M+ and the Lyric Theatre for dance.

The Centre for Contemporary Performance and Medium Theatre, black box theatres with 150 to 600 seats, will focus on theatre but they will be held up by the two-year delay in construction of the cross-border express railway.

Opera Hong Kong director Gordon Jones said while there were no dates for the larger venues such as the Great Theatre and concert hall, the Lyric Theatre should be made a multi-purpose venue for all performing arts.

Arts hub chief executive Michael Lynch said the HK$21.6 billion upfront endowment from the government had now grown to HK$24 billion after investment. Phase-three facilities would definitely be developed but the plans would need to be reviewed in future, he said.

But in response to the role of West Kowloon, Lynch said the arts hub "can't be divorced from the whole system". Its direction required "broader cultural policy" development.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 27th, 2014, 06:32 PM   #868
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Pledging to safeguard Hong Kong's heritage won't save traditions from dying out, critics fear
19 June 2014
South China Morning Post

Hong Kong has identified 480 items of intangible cultural heritage and pledged to safeguard them. But no one has thought about how to keep them alive.

This, critics say, is a result of the government's reluctance to develop a cultural policy that integrates intangible cultural heritage - including forms of kung fu and techniques for making delicacies like milk tea - into the cultivation of Hong Kong's cultural identity.

This is fundamental for arts and cultural development, heritage conservation and subsequent cultural and creative industries as well as cultural tourism, they say.

"The government only handles culture from a laissez-faire approach. There isn't a holistic vision or a master plan for cultural development," cultural critic and consultant Desmond Hui said. "Intangible cultural heritage carries intrinsic value that is important to a society's identity and knowledge," he said, adding that resources were allocated on a piecemeal basis.

In policy recommendations drafted in 2003 by the defunct Cultural and Heritage Commission, heritage - tangible and intangible - was identified as an important element in making Hong Kong an international cultural metropolis. The report said Hongkongers had to understand their own culture and history before introducing them to others. IN FULL: Click here to see the entire Hong Kong cultural heritage list

But the report was not fully adopted by the government.

And undersecretary for home affairs Florence Hui Hiu-fai said on Tuesday that the government had no concrete plans for safeguarding the 480 items of intangible heritage it had identified.

The Unesco Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage was drafted in 2003 but Hong Kong did not begin to react until 2007.

Dr Liu Tik-sang, director of the University of Science and Technology's South China Research Centre, which worked on the inventory list for three years, said Hong Kong was late to recognise the importance of intangible cultural heritage. The next step should be to identify items that might be lost.

Liu said "safeguarding" did not necessarily involve money. "What is most important is to keep these items alive as part of our lives," he said. "Archiving it and putting it in a museum is meaningless. It's not about staging a show for tourists either."

At the policy level, the government should work with the community. "Can the government provide a public space for people to learn kung fu at flexible times and not turn off the lights at night?" Liu asked.

The West Kowloon Cultural District should play a role in safeguarding intangible cultural heritage, board member Danny Yung Ning-tsun said.

The arts hub's Xiqu Centre, for example, shouldn't be just an ordinary venue for Chinese opera and music performances.

"It should be developed into a think tank [for Chinese opera] with a vision," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2014, 08:36 AM   #869
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Seen any white elephants lately?
23 June 2014
China Daily

The hugely extravagant West Kowloon cultural hub project is already a financial black hole and a massive "white elephant" just waiting to happen.

With Hong Kong's economic future becoming increasingly bleak it is absurd that the costs solely for the basement complex of the project have ballooned to HK$23 billion, about HK$1.4 billion more than the original estimate for the entire project, albeit several years ago.

The whole idea originated from a survey by the Tourism Board claiming that visitors thought Hong Kong should have more "cultural opportunities." The Tung Chee-hwa administration "picked up the ball", envisioning that Hong Kong could become Asia's hub of culture and arts. A wedge-shaped reclamation west of Yau Ma Tei was allocated for the site, and an international design competition held to select the best design. A flamboyant creation featuring a transparent canopy covering the entire site by Lord Norman Foster took the prize, but a few years later it was scrapped, the excessive cost being part of the reason.

Nevertheless, the grand vision still encompasses no fewer than 17 core arts and cultural venues, many of them packed into that "super-basement" occupying a mind-boggling 17 hectares.

Do these simple calculations offer a realistic view of just what we're getting into - how many tens of millions of bums-on-seats will be required to repay the HK$23 billion, plus all the other billions the rest of this complex will swallow up? Isn't it pure fantasy to imagine that even over 50 or 100 years it will pay for itself?

Wouldn't it be much better for this huge amount to be used instead for a pension fund for our increasingly aging population? Or must still more old people scavenge along dirty lanes looking for cardboard boxes and other recyclable trash to eke out an existence that is a blot on our consciences? As for the hub, let's settle on a far more modest set-up, and use the basement for a car park.

Moving on, the fact is that every year we already provide a rolling program of performances, presentations and other events covering festivals, music, dance, theatre, film, multi-arts and Chinese opera.

Easily the biggest event is the month-long Hong Kong Festival of Arts, while Chinese tradition is honored with colorful annual events marking the Birthdays of Tin Hau, Buddha and Tam Kung, plus the Dragon Boat and Mid-Autumn festivals and the Cheung Chau Bun Festival.

The fact is that we already have a quite remarkable spread of cultural facilities led by the Hong Kong Cultural Centre, and including the Hong Kong Coliseum, City Hall, Queen Elizabeth Stadium, and many civic centers, theaters and town halls.

Turning to museums, there are a dozen or so of them ranging from the comprehensive to the Law Uk and Sheung Yiu Folk Museums etc. And let us not forget the 65 public libraries available to us.

Yes, although not all of us may be aware of it, Hong Kong is blessed with a vast array of cultural venues and services for the man-in-the-street who makes up the great majority of Hong Kong residents.

Now let us move on to another point about the proposed West Kowloon Cultural Hub, which warrants the oxygen of public discussion. We hark back to last June's graduation ceremony for 276 students of the Academy for Performing Arts, many of whom took part in an extremely regrettable orgy of insulting and disgraceful misbehavior towards Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, who was presiding at the ceremony. One went so far as to turn his back on the CE, lift up his gown and figuratively point his backside at him; another gave him three deep bows in a revolting parody of a salute to the dead. Most of the others either pointed their middle fingers at him, gave him the thumbs-down or crossed their hands above their heads.

To their great credit, a small minority refused to join the vulgar demonstration and behaved themselves admirably despite peer pressure.

To return to the vast, rude and crude, majority, may we ask how many of these callow, undeserving brats are likely either to gain future employment at the hub, or perhaps appear on stage there in various performances?

If you were the government, would you give them a job?

Meanwhile, if this wretched project is indeed built in all its fallacious glory, will the government secretary directing cultural matters at that time be fully capable of fulfilling his responsibilities, unlike our present Transport Secretary Cheung Bing-leung, who blithely kept his silence and let the MTR administrative "train wreck" happen without uttering a word of warning to the government?

And one final question - How large a staff, enjoying how large a payroll, would be required to keep all the hub's venues up and running?

The author is a former civil servant and news agency correspondent.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 2nd, 2014, 08:06 PM   #870
kunming tiger
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: kunming
Posts: 7,029
Likes (Received): 1658

Valid questions better still exactly how much of the super basement will be occupied by commercial premises and what is the estimated gross revenues per year? If the answers are none and none then it's the worst case scenario in the article,
kunming tiger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2014, 03:35 PM   #871
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

By anyuan.li from dcfever :

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 20th, 2014, 05:32 PM   #872
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Declaration of independence for M+ - but museum won't open until 2018
19 July 2014
South China Morning Post

The West Kowloon arts hub's first museum will have its own board to ensure its independence and efficiency, it was revealed yesterday.

But filibustering by lawmakers means the M+ museum of visual culture will open up to six months late, in the first half of 2018 rather than late 2017.

The West Kowloon Cultural District Authority announced the changes in its latest update to lawmakers.

It said M+ would be a "separate legal entity", registered as a subsidiary company of the authority, rather than one of the authority's departments.

While the arts hub board will oversee policy and development for the entire site, the M+ board will focus on developing the museum's own mandate and vision, as well as its operations.

Under the museum's acquisition policy, a trust will be set up, separate to the museum, to own its collection. This would "remove legal ambiguity", boost transparency and accountability, and ensure artistic freedom and curatorial independence, the authority said.

However, work on the museum building has been delayed as the authority seeks cash from the Legislative Council to begin construction of the arts hub's vast basement, through which traffic will pass to ensure the area above ground is free of vehicles.

Filibustering of several controversial funding requests has led to a backlog of applications in Legco's Finance Committee, which will not meet again until October.

As of last month, M+ had bought almost 1,000 pieces and received more than 2,000 artworks from 51 donors, the report reveals.

The figures include 47 pieces of contemporary Chinese art bought from, and 1,463 works donated by, Swiss collector Uli Sigg. M+ had a budget for acquisitions and associated costs of HK$1.7 billion.

Meanwhile, the authority pledged to maintain the public park that will make up much of the arts hub as an urban oasis that would inspire "cultural pursuits" - and be free of foul language and dirty behaviour.

The authority will draft by-laws for the park and is proposing that spitting, urinating or defecating in public and using "obscene language" would be among the offences covered.

But the authority also cited a recent online survey in which 90 per cent of the 3,302 respondents favoured a hands-off approach to managing the park. Most said self-discipline by park visitors was key to maintaining order.

While the M+ team will be responsible for art installations in the park, it is not clear who else from the artistic team will be involved in the management of the public open space.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2014, 06:39 PM   #873
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Lawmakers assured on controls for museum project
The Standard
Thursday, July 24, 2014

The company to be set up by the Kowloon West Cultural District Authority to manage the M+ museum will not become an independent empire, a government official says.

Lawmakers at a meeting of the Legislative Council joint subcommittee monitoring the West Kowloon Cultural District project had earlier asked why the museum needed to be a separate legal entity, as this would make monitoring more difficult.

Authority chief executive Michael Lynch said being separate was essential if Hong Kong wanted a properly funded world-class museum.

"It is not a reason to set up a wholly owned subsidiary," Federation of Trade Unions lawmaker Chan Yuen-han said. What would happen if it became an independent empire?

Principal Assistant Secretary for Home Affairs Sabrina Law Chung agreed with Lynch but assured lawmakers there would be controls in place. Whatever the arrangements for staff, finance or business, the museum operators will still need to get the approval of the authority, Law said.

Meanwhile, it was revealed construction of the museum will be delayed by six months since Legco's Finance Committee failed to process a funding application before the summer recess.

Lars Nittve, executive director of M+ museum, said because of the funding delay, the completion date will be put back from the end of 2017 to the first half of 2018.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2015, 07:21 PM   #874
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Make arts hub an underground city, say lawmakers
13 January 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt

Government argues proposals would require digging deeper into the ground, raising costs

The HK$23 billion basement in West Kowloon Cultural District should house people as well as traffic say some lawmakers, who have proposed an underground city, providing retail and other services, connecting the arts hub to the neighbouring area.

But the government said doing so would mean digging deeper into the ground and would increase the bill that the taxpayer would have to foot.

At a meeting of the Legislative Council panel monitoring the development of the West Kowloon arts hub, Democrat Helena Wong Pik-wan questioned whether the HK$23 billion serves any purpose beyond traffic and underground parking.

“If it is only used for [this], we can’t explain to the public why this basement will cost HK$23 billion,” she said.

The arts hub received an upfront endowment of HK$21.6 billion public money in 2008; a master plan by Norman Foster – under which a basement would house all cars, keeping 23 hectares of open space above ground free from traffic – was selected.

The basement will cost an extra HK$23 billion to be covered by the government, which is seeking funding approval from Legco in different phases.

Wong highlighted the Japanese city of Osaka, which has a large network of underground facilities, including retail and dining, connecting a wide area.

But Betty Fung Ching Suk-yee, Permanent Secretary for Home Affairs, said that Foster’s design was for the basement to house traffic only.

“If we add other features, we will need to dig one or two levels deeper, and this extra cost will be reflected,” Fung said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2015, 08:37 AM   #875
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Boss in plea for culture hub funding
The Standard Excerpt
Friday, January 30, 2015

If legislators do not approve funding for the first phase of the West Kowloon cultural hub this year, the multibillion dollar project could grind to a halt, its chief executive warned.

Michael Lynch said the West Kowloon Cultural District Authority is asking for a pre- construction budget of HK$300 million for foundation work of an underground parking space, which along with integrated public infrastructure works, will eventually cost some HK$23 billion.

Lynch said foundation work started in August last year and the next part of the project will begin in September.

"We've already gone out on the tendering process and construction of the above ground park will commence in December this year," Lynch said. "Our view is we think the Legislative Council, politicians and the people of Hong Kong now see that it is important we are able to deliver the project as fast as we can.

"Clearly the decisions made by Legco over the course of this year are going to be very important to this project, not just to M+ [museum] but also to the other buildings."

Lynch said to some extent Legco's funding approval is outside of the authority's control. "But we hope that sense will prevail," he said.

If the government is unable to get the approvals from Legco, "then the project will grind to a halt," he said. "That is not something Hong Kong wants or ultimately the members of Legco would want."

Lynch was speaking after a time capsule ceremony to mark the construction of the M+ museum, the second flagship art and cultural facility in the hub.

It is scheduled to be completed in 2018 and will be open the following year.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 11th, 2015, 02:30 PM   #876
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Cultural hub boss quits
The Standard Excerpt
Wednesday, February 11, 2015



Chief Secretary Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor attacked the idea there was a rift between her and West Kowloon Cultural District Authority chief executive Michael Lynch, who quit yesterday citing health and personal reasons.

The Australian's departure was a great loss to Hong Kong, said Lam, who chairs the authority.

What was not highlighted was that Lynch's predecessor, Graham Sheffield, lasted only five months in the job, and also cited health reasons when quitting in January 2011.

Before that, former Disney executive Angus Cheng Siu-chuen lasted as executive director for only a week in 2009 then went for "personal reasons."

Lam, however, praised Lynch's work during his 3 years on the job, pointing to his leadership in getting the 40-hectare arts hub's development plan approved and construction of the Xiqu Centre and M+ museum started.

He "contributed significantly to the expansion of the arts and cultural scene," she said, and talk of strains between Lynch and her affecting the project - plagued with delays and controversy since its inclusion in the 1998 policy address of then chief executive Tung Chee-hwa - was "certainly not true."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2015, 05:13 AM   #877
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

By RAL from dcfever :

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2015, 03:34 PM   #878
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

HK Phil ‘deserves world-class venue’
7 April 2015
South China Morning Post Excerpt

Vice-chairman calls on government to deliver after European tour shows orchestra’s standard

The city’s top orchestra has proven its world-class standard and now the government should deliver on its promise of a new concert hall in West Kowloon, one of the Phil’s veterans says.

Liu Yuen-seng, vice-chairman of the Hong Kong Philharmonic’s board of governors, said the orchestra’s highly acclaimed European tour last month had lived up to a pledge made with a top government official seven years ago.

“In 2008, then chief conductor Edo de Waart and I, as board chairman, met with then chief secretary Henry Tang Ying-yen. He told us the new concert hall in West Kowloon was aiming to open in 2015 and he wanted the HK Phil to open it, not an orchestra from Vienna or Berlin,” said Liu in an exclusive interview with the South China Morning Post.

“We are now ready but West Kowloon is not, and the earliest date of a concert hall – if it gets built – would be after 2022.”

Last year, Chief Secretary Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor, Tang’s successor, announced that the hub’s “phase-three facilities” – presumably including the concert hall – would be looked at after completion of the first two phases by 2020.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2015, 07:37 PM   #879
macdalight
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1
Likes (Received): 0

thank you
macdalight no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2015, 09:58 PM   #880
SkYsCrApEr2013
The AlphaWolf of the Pack
 
SkYsCrApEr2013's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Sydney
Posts: 1,748
Likes (Received): 2083

Interesting articles
__________________
Top 10 tallest buildings:

Burj Khalifa, Shanghai Tower, Makkah Royal Clock Tower Hotel, Ping An Finance Center,
Goldin Finance 117, One World Trade Center, Chow Tai Fook Centre, Taipei 101, Shanghai World Financial Center and International Commerce Center.

R.I.P. Sawtooth Pack. You will be deeply missed.

I'm a really huge wolf lover! :D

I'M BACK!!!!
SkYsCrApEr2013 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu