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Old September 10th, 2005, 03:44 PM   #121
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some renderings please
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Old September 11th, 2005, 01:15 AM   #122
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The pics

I find thought pictures of the new building so nice in deed.
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Old September 11th, 2005, 03:29 AM   #123
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There are some renderings in page 3 of this thread.

The West Kowloon Waterfront master plan introduces new life into Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour. The project creates a mixed-use urban center and international tourist destination on reclaimed land north of Hong Kong Island.

Unified by a premier waterfront promenade and monorail system, this exciting combination of recreation, commercial, and tourist amenities reinforces Hong Kong as the “City of Life.”

The plan forms five distinct yet connected nodes along Victoria Harbour. Nodes include an arts and cultural district, convention center, island park, stadium, and wholesale market. Each component celebrates both Hong Kong’s history and new cultural life.

Source : http://www.hok.com/projects/selected...htm?sort=Alpha

HOK is a design and project service firm and these renderings may not reflect what is actually being considered by the government.





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Old September 13th, 2005, 02:50 AM   #124
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Culture hub developer 'can't lose'
Chloe Lai
28 July 2004
South China Morning Post

The value and earnings of the property developer that wins the West Kowloon cultural district project will get a big boost, even if it makes a loss on the cultural section, according to a Deutsche Bank report.

"We believe the project will enhance the winning developer's net asset value significantly, even though they may record losses from the operation of the cultural-related portion in the next 30 years," the report said.

The bank released the report, "WKCD - another Cyberport?", on Monday.

It puts the gain in net asset value accruing from the project at $4.87 billion, even if the cultural facilities record a net loss of $150 million every year for 30 years.

It also said the winning consortium's profit margin before tax and interest could reach 34 per cent. With a land premium of $1,800 per sq ft, the development cost will be about $28 billion, before interest.

Five consortiums submitted bids for the project last month. The winning developer will have the right to design, build and manage the 40-hectare site for 30 years.
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Old September 13th, 2005, 02:53 AM   #125
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Review of cultural sites mooted
Facelift plan for Tsim Sha Tsui raises doubts about future of public facilities located on waterfront
Ernest Kong
18 August 2004
South China Morning Post

The cultural facilities on the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront may come under review as part of the government's grand plan to turn Tsim Sha Tsui and West Kowloon into a major cultural and tourist attraction.

A government source said preliminary discussions had taken place on the need to review the use of cultural facilities, including the Hong Kong Cultural Centre and the Space Museum.

"It's natural that we have to review the use of facilities which show duplication in function {hellip} discussions have touched on the need to review use according to the progress of the West Kowloon cultural hub," he said, adding that the government had not come up with any options.

Because the first phase of the West Kowloon cultural hub will not be operational until 2010, it may be too early to ask if the review will be as drastic as Swire Properties' proposal for the West Kowloon cultural hub, which involves bulldozing the Museum of Arts and the Space Museum to make way for a new grand theatre.

"When we constructed the Hong Kong Cultural Centre in Tsim Sha Tsui many people said there was a need to knock down the City Hall in Central. But the one in Central is still serving the community," the source said.

FPDSavills Hong Kong senior director William Wong said there was a need to review the use of the Cultural Centre and Space Museum with the establishment of the mega-cultural hub on the 40-hectare reclaimed site on the West Kowloon waterfront.

But he thought knocking down the facilities was too drastic.

"They are landmarks of Tsim Sha Tsui," Mr Wong said.

He proposed that the government keep the buildings and turn them into retail malls to attract tourists.

A market observer said the government might start the reviewing process when major projects in the district were completed.

"It could well be the government's next step in reviving Tsim Sha Tsui after the completion of new railway connections and some existing area improvement projects," he said.

The Kowloon-Canton Railway Corp is building an extension of East Rail from Hunghom station to a new station in Tsim Sha Tsui East on Salisbury Road.

The station is expected to be completed by the end of this year, and it should boost Tsim Sha Tsui East's traffic flow.

Under a draft proposal from the Economic Development and Labour Bureau, the bus terminal adjoining the Star Ferry pier would be moved to Tsim Sha Tsui East next to Wing On Plaza. The vacant site would be turned into a plaza, with footbridges and a podium garden connecting to the pier.

Major landlords in Tsim Sha Tsui East - Sino Land and New World Development - are expected to cash in on the expected revival of the district.

Stephen Brown, a general manager of Sino Land, the largest landlord in Tsim Sha Tsui East, said the company was looking at renovating its premises to tap an expected boost of passenger flow which would present opportunities to raise the return from their buildings. "Tsim Sha Tsui East fell behind the whole district development with its poor accessibility. With the new railway connection, it will be back on the map," he said.

New World Development is also planning a facelift for its New World Centre near the new East Rail station.

The district will also see new landmarks. Near the Hong Kong Cultural Centre is the former Marine Police headquarters. Built 120 years ago, it will be turned into a hotel and an open-air piazza by developer Cheung Kong (Holdings). According to a company spokeswoman, the project should be completed by the end of 2006.

Plans have been approved for a Ferris wheel to be erected on Wharf Holdings' Ocean Terminal extension. The developer expects the 52-capsule Ferris wheel to boost its retail portfolio along Canton Road. However, the KCRC and Wharf have been at odds over the building of a station in Canton Road along the Kowloon Southern Link - a 3.8km passenger rail line linking the West Rail terminus at Nam Cheong station with East Rail's Tsim Sha Tsui East station.

The KCRC and the government are re-examining the feasibility of building a station in Canton Road, following outrage over plans that show the proposed Kowloon Southern Link rail line will overlook one of the city's busiest tourist and shopping areas. The study should be completed next month, when it will be presented to legislators.
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Old September 13th, 2005, 05:50 AM   #126
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Paris' modern art behemoth bids for controversial Hong Kong culture hub

HONG KONG, Oct 12 (AFP) - Paris' prestigious art and design institute the Pompidou Centre has joined a bid to run a museum of modern art in Hong Kong, officials said Monday announcing plans for its first foray outside of France.

The institute hopes to open the museum in the heart of a 40-hectare spit of reclaimed land on the shores of the Kowloon district that has been earmarked by the government as an arts hub housing a string of cultural and sports centres.

"It has always been the intention of the Pompidou Centre to bring dialogue between cultures and with a museum of modern art in Hong Kong we can achieve a two-way exchange between East and West," Bruno Racine, Pompidou Centre president, told AFP.

"We think that by providing a significant role, through our collection and our savoir faire, we can create a significant cultural centre for all of Asia," Racine added.

The announcement was timed to coincide with a visit to China and Hong Kong by French President Jacques Chirac. He is spearheading an initiative to raise the profile of France in China in the hope of winning a larger share of the growing wealth of the fast-growing economic giant.

The institute has joined forces with the Dynamic Star consortium that includes local property giants Sun Hung Kai and Cheung Kong, which is bidding to build and run all the facilities at the so-called West Kowloon Cultural Centre, the city's largest cultural development.

Although the tendering process is not yet over, local media speculate about five consortia will bid for what is expected to be a 24 billion Hong Kong dollar (3.07 billion US dollar) scheme.

If the consortium wins its bid, the museum should be up and running by 2012, and would be the Pompidou Centre's only facility outside its home country.

"We have no plans for worldwide expansion but we felt we needed a presence in China," said Racine.

While the museum's exhibits will initially rely on some of the 54,500 works of art in the institute's Paris collection and works loaned from other Asian galleries, it will eventually build up its own permanent collection from around the region.

The Dynamic Star details have not yet been finalised but it envisages the Pompidou Centre will pay little up front: the developers will build the 13,000-square metre museum leaving the institute to run it, buy or provide the art to fill it and organise its exhibitions.

Controversial British architect Sir Norman Foster has been slated to design the museum.

The government-set contract provides for the developer to subsidise the museum for the first 30 years.

"This is a very exciting opportunity for us to play a part in China at a time of change," said Racine.

The West Kowloon Cultural District proposal has been the subject of enormous controversy in Hong Kong, where planners and architects argue it will do little to nurture local talent and will be too far removed from the rest of the city to be economically viable.

They have also criticised Foster's proposal to cover the entire hub in a gigantic undulating glass roof, saying the feature would be expensive and impractical.
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Old September 13th, 2005, 06:06 AM   #127
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Chirac visit to Hong Kong hoped to forge new cultural bonds

HONG KONG, Oct 12 (AFP) - When President Jacques Chirac opens the first exhibition in Asia of one of France's artistic treasures, Picasso's "The Parade", in Hong Kong, he will also be unveiling what is hoped to be a new era in cultural cooperation.

Chirac will be in the territory for barely half a day at the end of a swing through China aimed primarily at winning French industry some of the business being generated by the emerging economic giant.

But the visit will be significant as it satisfies another plank of the trip -- to share with China France's rich cultural heritage.

Hong Kong has been chosen as the setting for the first overseas expansion of France's renowned institution of modern art and design, the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.

The centre announced Monday it had hitched itself to one of five consortia of Hong Kong developers bidding for a string of cultural centres in a so-called arts hub on the Kowloon harbourside.

If the bid goes through, the Pompidou centre will run, provide and purchase art for display in a museum of modern art, which has already been dubbed HK-MOMA.

"While the HK MOMA will benefit from our expertise and our collection, it will develop its very own personality, providing a unique blend of Western and Asian art," the centre's president Bruno Racine told AFP.

Picasso's stunning, colossal "The Parade" is deemed an apt choice to launch the French-Chinese initiative. Painted on an actual stage curtain and depicting a backstage theatrical scene, it brims with life waiting to be unleashed at the lifting of the drape.

The masterpiece is on loan from the Pompidou centre. Its exhibition at a huge new shopping mall in downtown Hong Kong represents only the 11th time it has gone on show in 50 years.

HK MOMA will be one part of a grander complex called the West Kowloon Cultural District that Racine hopes will become a focus for modern art from all over the region.

If the deal goes ahead, it will mark the institute's first foray outside of home territory.

Although Racine said the museum had no plans for world expansion like its American peer, the Guggenheim, it had been looking to branch into China.

"We have a pattern of relationships with museums in cities all over the world, but not in China," he said. "We made a decision some time ago that we needed to be in China."

The consortium presented the opportunity when it approached the institute for input.

In what amounts to a sweetheart deal, the Pompidou centre will pay nothing towards the construction of the centre, although it will have a hand in its design.

The museum's expenses will be guaranteed by a proviso built into the tender deal that the developer will cover all shortfalls in costs for the first 30 years, Racine said.

"That is important as it gives us the room to draw up a long-term vision for HK MOMA, to build it into one of the world's leading museums."

The proposed art-hub scheme, valued at around 24 billion Hong Kong dollars (more than three billion US), has sparked controversy in Hong Kong, where it has been criticised as a white elephant in the making.

The local art community is up in arms on the issue too, and news of the possible participation of one of the world's most prestigious art institutes has left it cold.

"It's just another real estate deal that's using the promise of art as a gloss to make it look good," said John Batten whose John Batten Gallery has been exhibiting modern local artists for eight years.

"You don't need the Pompidou Centre to run a museum here -- we can do it."

Questions have also been raised about whether the institute would allow its acquisitions policy to be influenced by China, which has long suppressed what it considers subversive art.

"I don't foresee any problems," said Racine. "Our acquisitions committee will be made up of of independent people whose views and policies will be made on artistic, not political, judgements."
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Old September 13th, 2005, 06:12 AM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
... HK tell me they're not seriously entertaining such disgraceful concepts such as this one. If you take away Foster's canopy and sleek design, it's nothing more than a cluster of buildings, certainly not a tourist attraction.... and worse, not even close to being a city landmark.

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Old September 13th, 2005, 11:09 PM   #129
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Fresh calls for rethink of cultural project contract
Ng Kang-chung and Peggy Sito
20 October 2004
South China Morning Post

The government is facing renewed calls to drop its plan to hand the West Kowloon cultural project to one bidder now that the property market is looking up.

With developers showing strong bidding interest in government sites, academics and legislators said the government should reconsider the option of auctioning the residential and commercial lots in the proposed cultural district and use the capital to sustain cultural facility development.

Legislative Council members said they would press the government to rethink the proposal at the Legco planning, lands and works panel next Tuesday.

Non-affiliated legislator Albert Chan Wai-yip said: "It is a very big project involving a lot of money and valuable land resources. We should do it properly. Now the market situation has changed. The outlook for the property market seems brighter.

"Developers are more eager to bid for land. I would question whether the single-contract approach is still the best option."

Mr Chan said he would urge the government to rethink its approach at next week's panel meeting. Similar views were shared by legislator Albert Ho Chun-yan, vice-chairman of the Democratic Party, who said his party opposed the single-contract approach.

The project, with a giant canopy designed by Lord Foster, will be built on 40 hectares of reclaimed land on the southern tip of the West Kowloon reclamation.

About 30 per cent of the site will be earmarked for arts and culture and the rest for commercial and residential development. The cost of the entire project is estimated at $24 billion but could rise as the value of shops and residential developments in the proposed district is expected to surge.

The project is controversial because the government wants one contract, the winner of which will design, build and operate the cultural district for 30 years. Construction is expected start in early 2007.

Smaller developers said the tendering method excluded them from competing. The arts community has also expressed concerns at the lack of consultation and said the project might risk being turned into a developers' colony. Five bids were received before the June 19 deadline for submissions.

One bid from a joint venture between the city's two biggest developers, Sun Hung Kai Properties and Cheung Kong (Holdings), is tipped to be the probable winner.

Polytechnic University associate professor Lam Pun-lee said: "Society will react in a big way if the government insists on granting the project to one bidder."

He urged the government to auction the sites separately and use the funds to support cultural development because it was the fairest and most efficient way to maximise government revenues.

Wong Kwok-chung, an associate professor of real estate and construction at the University of Hong Kong, said the government must be careful about granting the project because of the political environment.

Some market observers said because of the uncertainty of the West Kowloon development, developers including Cheung Kong and Sun Hung Kai Properties had bid aggressively in last week's land auction, looking for ways to replenish their land banks. The Housing Planing and Lands Bureau said an exhibition of all proposals that met government requirements would be held next year.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 05:36 AM   #130
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Property giant out to build more on arts hub site
Henderson boss says he's determined to win West Kowloon job 'for the people'
Gary Cheung
30 October 2004
South China Morning Post

Like other developers bidding for the contract to build the West Kowloon arts hub, Henderson Land is proposing a higher-density development than the government wants.

But it would stick closer to the government target than some rivals, said Henderson Land vice-chairman Colin Lam Ko-yin, who called the company's proposed plot ratio "quite restrained".

The property giant's bid for the project proposes a plot ratio - representing a project's developed area compared to its site area - of 2.5, including 0.7 for cultural facilities. The government set the overall plot ratio at 1.81, but Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen said last year the winner could have a high ratio if essential.

Architects have estimated the 1.81 plot ratio could result in 7,600 flats being built, with the gross floor area of the project estimated at 10 million sq ft.

Henderson's solo bid is competing for the project with a Sun Hung Kai Properties-Cheung Kong joint venture; Swire Properties; and a consortium comprising Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings), Chinese Estates Holdings and K Wah Group. Other bidders have sought a plot ratio as high as three.

Due for completion in 2012, the $24 billion project on a reclaimed site near Kowloon Station will include theatres, museums, shops and flats.

The initial plan is for shops, flats and cultural facilities to occupy about 30 per cent of the site each.

Henderson Land Development chairman Lee Shau-kee said he was determined to win the bid, saying he would not mind losing billions of dollars in operating the cultural hub.

"We won't let Hong Kong people down or make them lose face," the tycoon said. The West Kowloon development has become a centre of controversy since the government unveiled its plan to turn the prime waterfront site into a world-class cultural zone last September.

Its decision to hand over the project to a single developer for 30 years has sparked criticism from smaller developers, who say the scheme favoured big developers.

Mr Lam said his company would invite museums on the mainland and in Europe, including the Pompidou Centre in Paris, to co-operate in operating the West Kowloon arts hub if it won the bid.

Meanwhile, Henderson will join forces with the Arts Development Council and the Arts Centre to display paintings and art collections in shopping malls operated by the company from November 24.

Darwin Che, chairman of the Arts Development Council, said it was a good beginning for collaboration between the arts and business sectors to promote arts in the community.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 06:00 AM   #131
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Arts district trustee plan would foster public trust
8 November 2004
South China Morning Post

As the date nears for the government to make public its shortlist of candidates to build the West Kowloon cultural district, the bidders have stepped up their publicity efforts. Development conglomerates are mounting art exhibitions, their chiefs are giving interviews and big-name museums are being unveiled as potential partners.

Perhaps not to be outdone, the government is making its own bid for public support, revealing it is considering setting up a board of trustees to manage the arts venues within the controversial project. This is a wonderful idea, and could well ease many of the public concerns about the project, although much still depends on the final details of any such arrangement.

The stakes are high in West Kowloon. The public may not be putting a cent into the building of the museums and concert halls, but the subsidy comes in the form of handing over what is perhaps the last large piece of harbourfront land that can be developed. The idea that whatever is built there has to benefit the public has wide acceptance, but the cynicism about this being a developer-led, profit-oriented project still remains. The scepticism will remain until the plans are revealed for public consultation at the end of this year, if not longer.

Whatever the developers might say, much of their interest in the project has to do with simple economics. Luxury property in the neighbourhood is fetching ever-higher prices and the size of the project will give the winner a dominant position in the Hong Kong real estate market for years to come. In a remarkably candid remark, Henderson Land Development chairman Lee Shau-kee said recently he would be willing to lose billions on the cultural side of the project. No doubt many of the bidders must think this way, as they stand to make many times such an amount in profit on the commercial real estate. There are already indications that all of them have asked for higher plot ratios than the government set out at the start, meaning more saleable floor space will be built.

It is difficult to judge the merits of any of the proposals without seeing the details, but the principal aims should remain: fostering cultural development and having commercial development as part of, but not dominating, the project. The sooner the plans are unveiled, the sooner the public will be able to judge whether these requirements have been met.

The public should resist the temptation, however, to focus only on plot ratios and profit margins. Management of the arts venues should be scrutinised, since it will determine the success of the cultural side of the development - for the 30 years of the management contract and beyond. Local arts groups have already expressed fears that they will be sidelined. Questions abound about how the new arts district will co-exist alongside the museums and performance spaces now being administered by a highly bureaucratic Leisure and Cultural Services Department. If potential developers already see the arts development side as a loss centre, not a profit-making proposition, what guarantee is there that they will manage it well or for maximum public benefit?

Hong Kong need not sell itself short. The biggest names in the museum and design world have expressed interest in playing a role in West Kowloon, a sign of the draw the city has. Luring the Guggenheims and the Pompidous of the world here will not be the hard part. The hard part will be getting the management of the project right, giving due emphasis to what will go into the buildings once they are built and fostering the patronage culture that is the backbone of the arts world elsewhere.

A board of trustees that has genuine public involvement could do a lot to overcome the scepticism and the pitfalls. It could even lay the groundwork for a new way of steering Hong Kong's cultural development if and when the government decides to play a less active role in the sector.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 06:03 AM   #132
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Trustees may oversee cultural hub
The public would be represented on West Kowloon board

Chloe Lai
8 November 2004
South China Morning Post

The government may set up a board of trustees to oversee management of the West Kowloon cultural district, a government source said.

The source said members of the public would have representatives on the board of trustees.

Officials are reportedly studying how similar projects in North America, Europe, Australia and Japan are managed.

A selection committee is still examining the five proposals submitted by developers.

The shortlisted development bids would be announced by Christmas, the source said.

"The company winning the project will not dominate the board of trustees," the source said.

"Those who represent the public interest won't be simply window-dressing. The trustee must be accountable to the public."

Ada Wong Ying-kay, a prominent member of the arts and cultural community, said that more than one board of trustees should be established: one could focus on the management of the museums, and one on the performing arts venues.

"The philosophy of managing a museum is very different from the performing arts. I can't see how one board of trustees can do the job effectively," said Ms Wong, who was a member of the now-defunct cultural and heritage commission.

She also said that the developer should not dominate decisions on how money would be spent.

Otherwise, having members of the public appointed to the board of trustees would have little effect on the project, she said.

The government wants to transform the 40-hectare plot of reclaimed land near Kowloon station into a regional cultural hub.

Five bids were received from developers before the June 19 deadline for submissions.

They include Dynamic Star International (a joint venture between Cheung Kong Holdings and Sun Hung Kai Properties); Swire Properties; Henderson Land; and a consortium of Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings), Chinese Estates Holdings and the K Wah Group. There is also a mysterious individual bidder, Lam Sze-tat.

Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen said earlier this year that the government wanted to foster a greater sense of public ownership in the project.

This is why the shortlisted development proposals will be exhibited early next year for public consultation. The government plans to hold public forums on the proposals during the exhibition period.

The core cultural facilities, such as theatres and museums, are expected to be completed in stages from early 2011.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 06:12 AM   #133
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Property giants unveil vision for cultural hub
Our plan for West Kowloon will generate $216b over 50 years, say developers

Chloe Lai
9 November 2004
South China Morning Post

The massive West Kowloon Cultural District project will generate economic benefits of $216 billion over a 50-year period, according to a key contender for the rights to develop the site.

Dynamic Star International says the project will create 29,000 jobs during construction and 8,500 permanent jobs afterwards.

The Cheung Kong (Holdings)-Sun Hung Kai Properties joint venture made the predictions yesterday as it published details of its proposals in two hard-covered books.

Under the Dynamic team proposal, there will be three zones - an eastern gateway, a retail and entertainment spine and a cultural headland. Arts and cultural facilities will occupy 315,860 square metres. About 20,000 square metres will be reserved for government offices and a community centre.

They also promised to give the city a prime urban park with almost 30 hectares of landscaped open space and piazzas.

The soaring, curved canopy that was a key feature of architect Lord Foster's prize-winning design for the cultural district is envisaged as a climate modifier, incorporating solar panels for water, heating and electricity, as well as providing ventilation.

It will also collect 20,000 cubic metres of rainwater each year for use within the development and to irrigate the park.

Dynamic's proposal, the last to be unveiled, is more comprehensive than those of its competitors - Swire Properties, Henderson Land, and a consortium of Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings) and Chinese Estates Holdings. They largely focus on the general artistic impression and the name of their chief architect.

The government wants to turn the reclaimed land near Kowloon Station into a regional cultural hub. The winning bid will have the right to develop and manage the site for 30 years, prompting fears it will be a developer's colony.

Dynamic estimates the number of visitors in 2014 will be 50 million, generating spending of $6 billion in real terms.

Under the Dynamic plan, the arts and cultural facilities will be governed by an independent foundation. It will comprise members elected from the community and the local arts and cultural sector.

The joint venture promised "the principles of democracy, transparency and accountability will be enshrined in the mode of governance of the district".

The constructions represent a plot ratio of 3.285, a higher density than the Henderson Land proposal of 2.5. The bidder says the canopy, imitating a flying dragon, will incorporate environment-friendly features and contribute to a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 10:26 PM   #134
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Consortium proposes plot ratio of 3.28 times
Raymond Wang
9 November 2004
Hong Kong Standard

A consortium of Hong Kong's two biggest developers, Cheung Kong (Holdings) and Sun Hung Kai Properties, has proposed a plot ratio of 3.28 times for the HK$40 billion West Kowloon cultural hub project.

The plot ratio will determine the number of flats to be built on the 40-hectare waterfront site, as well as the floor area of its cultural facilities.

The consortium, Dynamic Star International, is one of five bidders for development rights to the site.

Under its proposal, the complex, without requiring further reclamation, would generate a total gross floor area of more than 14 million square feet _ 7.2 million sq ft of residential, a 2.5 million-sq-ft office-retail complex, an 800,000-sq-ft hotel, and 3.5 million sq ft of cultural attractions.

The cultural portion will feature three theatres; museums for movies, Chinese opera, modern art and children; and lecture halls for the Hong Kong Polytechnic School of Design.

Sunny Development, which groups Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings) and Chinese Estates Holdings, has proposed a plot ratio of more than 3.3 times to maximise residential potential and reduce investment risk.

Henderson Land Development, bidding alone, has proposed a plot ratio of about 2.5 times _ 1.7 for property development and 0.8 for the cultural aspect.

The current plot ratio on the site is 1.81 times, but the government says this can be adjusted.

According to Dynamic Star International, the project would create 29,000 man years of work during construction and add 8,500 permanent jobs. It estimates the project would attract 50 million visitors in 2014, representing aggregate additional spending of HK$6 billion in real terms.

Over 50 years, it would generate net economic benefits of HK$216 billion in nominal terms.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 10:28 PM   #135
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Arts hub contenders promise to put culture, not profit, first
Chloe Lai
11 November 2004
South China Morning Post

Property developers shortlisted for the West Kowloon cultural district project yesterday vowed to make the area an international icon.

The companies stressed it was not a property project, and also promised to make the arts and cultural facilities self-sustaining and able to operate over a long period.

Sun Hung Kai Properties executive director Alfred So Chung-keung said its consortium could repeat the success story seen in Paris.

"Paris in the past few hundred years has successfully attracted the best arts talent. I envisage [that] Hong Kong can do it with West Kowloon," he said.

Sun Hung Kai and Cheung Kong Holdings are bidding for the project under a joint venture, Dynamic Star International. Under the government's plan, the successful bidder will manage the site for 30 years.

"We would like to see the cultural district live a very long life. It would be irresponsible if, 30 years later when we return the project to Hong Kong, it is losing money. Not every arts and cultural facility will lose money," Mr So said.

He said the consortium had signed a co-operation memo with the Guangzhou Municipal Bureau of Culture, the Shanghai Museum and China Cultural City.

It had earlier signed deals with the New York-based Guggenheim Foundation, the Pompidou Centre in Paris and the Beijing Palace Museum.

"This is not a property project. The property developments in West Kowloon are to support arts and cultural activities," said Mr So.

Henderson Land vice-chairman Colin Lam Ko-yin said the company's proposed World City Culture Park was also not a property project and was only intended to make "very little profit" while protecting its shareholders' interests.

Mr Lam said the company had no plan to sign deals with any internationally renowned museum or arts group, saying it wanted to listen to the public's views on how the area should take shape.

Sino Land's executive director Yu Wai-wai said the company's plan would raise cultural and economic standards.

Sino Land has formed Sunny Development with Wharf (Holdings) and Chinese Estates Holdings to bid for the project.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 10:30 PM   #136
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Swire knocked out in first round
No-canopy design for cultural area is rejected
Gary Cheung
11 November 2004
South China Morning Post

The proposals for developing the West Kowloon cultural district put forward by Swire Properties and a mystery individual bidder have been rejected in the first stage of the government's assessment of the massive project.

Chief Secretary Donald Tsang Yam-kuen told the Legislative Council three of five proposals had been shortlisted for further assessment and public consultation, which starts in the middle of next month.

The three shortlisted bidders are Dynamic Star International, a Cheung Kong (Holdings) and Sun Hung Kai Properties joint venture; Sunny Development, a consortium formed between Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings) and Chinese Estates Holdings; and World City Culture Park Limited, a subsidiary of Henderson Land Development,

Swire Properties' proposal was rejected by the assessment committee because it does not include the soaring transparent canopy, the centrepiece of the original design by renowned architect Lord Foster, as required by the government's invitation for proposals.

Mr Tsang said Swire's proposal failed to provide core arts and cultural facilities, such as a museum cluster and art exhibition centre in the West Kowloon cultural district in accordance with the government's requirements.

"Swire Properties scatters the required arts and cultural facilities in Tsim Sha Tsui, Tamar and [at] Fenwick Pier, which will not create the clustering effect envisaged by the original design," he said.

A proposal by individual bidder Lam Sze-tat was also excluded from further assessment.

Mr Tsang reiterated the arts hub was not a property project, and denied it would be "another Cyberport". That development was criticised for the absence of open tendering.

A public consultation exercise on the West Kowloon project will start in the middle of next month. Exhibits from the three shortlisted bidders will be displayed for six weeks at the Hong Kong Science Museum in Tsim Sha Tsui. The government will also hold discussion forums in various districts.

Swire Properties said the company had always supported the need for transparency and full public consultation for major projects of public interest.

"In view of the small number of submissions, Swire believes that the interests of the public would best be served if all submissions are presented so as to elicit constructive community dialogue on the different developers' approaches," it said.

Gordon Ongley, director and general manager of Swire Properties, said: "Our concept provides a viable alternative for the community's consideration."

Mr Tsang said construction of the project was expected to start in April 2007 and take four years.
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Old September 15th, 2005, 05:13 AM   #137
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I'm rooting for:

#1: World City Culture Park Ltd.

#2: Dynamic Star International Ltd.

The other one by Sunny Development looks awful.

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Old September 15th, 2005, 09:38 AM   #138
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won`t get built by 2046.
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Old September 25th, 2005, 03:48 AM   #139
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Tung's sister inks arts hub proposal
Chloe Lai
Nov. 11, 2004
South China Morning Post

An arts groups headed by a sister of Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa is to set up an ink-painting museum in the West Kowloon cultural district.

The museum is one of four the government recommends be built in the tender document for the district. The other three are museums of the moving image, design and contemporary arts.

Alice King, a younger sister of Mr Tung and vice-chairwoman of the Ink Society, said she had spoken to her brother about the idea of having the museum. "I have talked to many arts professionals first to see if this idea is feasible and viable. Of course, I talked [with my brother], otherwise nothing would have happened," Mrs King said.

A leading figure in the world of avant-garde Chinese painting, Mrs King said she expected questions would be raised about the link between her family connections and the museum's inclusion in the plans for the cultural hub. But she stressed there was nothing untoward in the process and that she was prepared to brave a storm of controversy for the good of Hong Kong.

"I have been in the field for more than 25 years. I am an art professional. I have a passion and vision for this ink museum," she said. "I hope people know me - then they would think otherwise. I have a clear conscience.''

Ink Society board member Vincent Lo Wing-sang said the society had no idea how the government decided on having an ink museum.

Mr Lo said the idea for the museum had been supported by the arts sector, and had also been recommended by the defunct cultural and heritage commission.

The news came as the government announced yesterday that three companies were shortlisted for the mega project: a joint venture between Cheung Kong (Holdings) and Sun Hung Kai Properties; Henderson Land; and a consortium of Sino Land, Wharf (Holdings) and Chinese Estates Holdings.

Mrs King said the society was holding discussions with the shortlisted firms but would not sign any deal with the bidders. "We are not here to help any of them to bid for the project," she said.

Both Henderson Land and the Sino Land-led consortium had promised to provide the society with an individual building, while Cheung Kong and Sun Hung Kai included the project as part of the museum of contemporary arts.

The society hopes Cheung Kong and Sun Hung Kai will change their mind. "We need a distinct, iconic building," Mrs King said.
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Old September 25th, 2005, 11:41 PM   #140
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aboveday
won`t get built by 2046.
lol...are you sure?
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