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Old October 23rd, 2007, 10:22 PM   #181
mhays
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A Portland-Seattle-Vancouver line would connect three growing cities with prosperous, transit-using centers that happen to be ideal distances from each other.

We have decent (5 per day?) slower service from Seattle to Portland now, and a little service (2 per day?) to Vancouver. The first step is adding a few more per day to those routes. But HSR is very difficult because we don't have Hartford's plethora of rail ROW, and creating new ROW would be extraordinarily difficult and expensive.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 12:38 AM   #182
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This is a map I drew up a few months ago for North American HSR. Looking back, its not perfect, as I would add a line to Halifax from Quebec City, and cover western Mexico. Colours indicate priority/speed of the route.

1. Red
2. Blue
3. Green



(The line cutoff at the bottom would go to Panama City, and the one at the top to Edmonton)
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Old October 24th, 2007, 12:43 AM   #183
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it's a good start, at least.
www.cahighspeedrail.ca.gov
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Old October 24th, 2007, 12:46 AM   #184
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For here in the midwest, it would have to stop in every city with a population of 10'000 or higher, same for the rest of the country.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 01:38 AM   #185
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Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
I've always wished that here in the US, the powers that be would build a 'Bullet' train system, comprable to the type seen in parts of Europe and Japan. If I could design the system, I would start in an area where I think the population would be the most receptive to it. I think the best area here in the States would be the northeast 'Megopolis,' which for those of you who arent familiar, is the massive urban area consisting of Boston/NYC/Philadelphia/Baltimore/DC. I think a bullet train would be ideal for that area and I would base it on the Express/Local system with two train options:
1. Express - This train would include all major stops - Boston - Grand Central Terminal - Philly - DC.
2. Local - Boston - New Haven - Grand Central Terminal - Philly - Baltimore - DC.

I would build the system so that the trains would have connections to each cities respective train/bus systems. What would you do?....and what areas in the States do you think would be best?
The Acela express already travels at speed up to 150 mph between Boston and DC with very few stops (Penn station in NY instead of Grand Central). The stations are already connected to local subway and commuter lines in each city. The trip takes about 6 hours. Probably faster than a car under good traffic conditions, and way more comfortable than a plane. Cutting the time in half would be really expensive.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 01:40 AM   #186
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well,in europe you have a following system(at least in Germany):
U-Bahn or subway which covers most of the city,sometimes even the suburbs!
S-Bahn or suburban rail network,which covers the city and the surrounding area,sometimes goes as far as 50 km from the city!
then you have following train systems:regional,IC(intercity) and ICE,(TGV in France),which is a high speed trail connecting major cities throughout Europe!i personally think its one of the best systems(i don't no the japanese one),but its very effective and fast!i think the US should model its system after this,but it obviously won't,since they believe in "American exceptionalism"!
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Old October 24th, 2007, 02:08 AM   #187
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many cities in the US are too low-density for rail travel within cities, but high-speed trains would be very convenient between major cities linking them together, especially in places like texas where there's 4 major cities within 300 miles of each other
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Old October 24th, 2007, 03:11 AM   #188
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OMH View Post
well,in europe you have a following system(at least in Germany):
U-Bahn or subway which covers most of the city,sometimes even the suburbs!
S-Bahn or suburban rail network,which covers the city and the surrounding area,sometimes goes as far as 50 km from the city!
then you have following train systems:regional,IC(intercity) and ICE,(TGV in France),which is a high speed trail connecting major cities throughout Europe!i personally think its one of the best systems(i don't no the japanese one),but its very effective and fast!i think the US should model its system after this,but it obviously won't,since they believe in "American exceptionalism"!
America is making great strides to get mass transit.
NA and EU are layed out differently, and they have for hundreds of years.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 03:42 AM   #189
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tocoto View Post
The Acela express already travels at speed up to 150 mph between Boston and DC with very few stops (Penn station in NY instead of Grand Central). The stations are already connected to local subway and commuter lines in each city. The trip takes about 6 hours. Probably faster than a car under good traffic conditions, and way more comfortable than a plane. Cutting the time in half would be really expensive.
Really??.....I never knew about this. How much does it cost?
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Old October 24th, 2007, 04:11 AM   #190
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Quote:
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America is making great strides to get mass transit.
NA and EU are layed out differently, and they have for hundreds of years.
i don't see much of this though!
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Old October 24th, 2007, 04:25 AM   #191
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Please don't ruin this thread, it's actually quite a good subject.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 04:33 AM   #192
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Quote:
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Please don't ruin this thread, it's actually quite a good subject.
i'm not ruining it,but i'm just saying that i don't think the US is doing enough for PT!for example,the chicago el should get renovated,its slow and the wagons are old!!
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Old October 24th, 2007, 04:38 AM   #193
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It's not...the US rail system is a joke, true, that's why we are thinking of hypothetical ideas.

Telling stuff we already know isn't helping though.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 04:44 AM   #194
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It's not...the US rail system is a joke, true, that's why we are thinking of hypothetical ideas.

Telling stuff we already know isn't helping though.
so i maked an idea!another idea is:the US should start build an high-speed rail network,like the ICE or shinkanzen linking the major systems..currently the US only have one route,but i think they could build following routes:NYC-Philadelphia-Pittsburgh-Cleveland-Chicago and Chicago-Detroit-Toronto-Ottawa-Montreal-Quebec city!
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Old October 24th, 2007, 09:37 AM   #195
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tocoto View Post
The Acela express already travels at speed up to 150 mph between Boston and DC with very few stops (Penn station in NY instead of Grand Central). The stations are already connected to local subway and commuter lines in each city. The trip takes about 6 hours. Probably faster than a car under good traffic conditions, and way more comfortable than a plane. Cutting the time in half would be really expensive.
The Acela one reaches 150 mph on a very short distance. The average speed is only about 70 mph, which less than half of the newest high-speed rail lines elsewhere. It would be really expensive to cut time in half, but probably well worth it. Trains should be able to outcompete planes in that corridor, which would both be better for the environment and relieve airport congestion.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 10:12 AM   #196
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I've taken the Japanese bullet trains between Kyoto and Tokyo and the LGV between Paris and Lyon. The LGV is more like an airplane, you need to make reservations etc. The japanese bullet trains are like a subway, you just get on and find a seat. Both beat anything in the US. If we had a government with some vision, we could invest in already existing technology and eliminate the overcrowding which is making so many of our airports impossible.

A good start would be a Chicago to New York line with stops in Toledo(with connector to Detroit); Cleveland; Pittsburgh; Philly; and central N.J. this could easily be extended to Boston. Second line from NY to Miami with stops in Philly; Wilmington; Baltimore; DC; Richmond; Charlotte: Atlanta: Savannah; Jacksonville; Orlando(with branch to Tampa); Fort Lauderdale; Miami.

West coast could connect LA; SanDiego; Palm Springs; and Las Vegas then extend to San Francisco; Sacremento; Portland; and Seattle. Eventually the areas in between could be filled in. The problem is the rail right of ways are generally reserved for slow frieghts. That's one of the reason AmTrak sucks even more than it has to. I believe government intervention is required to provide the US with a modern train system.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 03:46 PM   #197
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Quote:
Originally Posted by virgule82 View Post
The Acela one reaches 150 mph on a very short distance. The average speed is only about 70 mph, which less than half of the newest high-speed rail lines elsewhere. It would be really expensive to cut time in half, but probably well worth it. Trains should be able to outcompete planes in that corridor, which would both be better for the environment and relieve airport congestion.
Yes....I agree with you. I think that bullet trains would better serve regionally. Once you start to deal with distances over 500 miles, it makes more sense to fly. Distances between several major cities in this country are just too far. I think regional lines would be great for Boston/NYC/Philly/DC and their respective metro areas. I also think that Miami/Ft. Lauderdale/Orlando/Tampa would be great, Chicago/Cleveland/Columbus, Houston/Dallas/San Antonio, San Diego/LA/Vegas, San Fran/Portland/Seattle. Also, second lines for NYC/Albany/Montreal, Seattle/Vancouver etc....
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Old October 25th, 2007, 02:47 AM   #198
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Quote:
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Yes....I agree with you. I think that bullet trains would better serve regionally. Once you start to deal with distances over 500 miles, it makes more sense to fly. Distances between several major cities in this country are just too far.
I won't be so sure about that, the major advancements that is achieved with maglev technology would make 500miles or 800 Km an hour and a half ride within two decades. Considering that it would take at least that much time to get it planned, approved, and procure the land to start construction, I think it would be safe to say that optimal distance for plane travel would be pushed up to 1200 miles or 1900Km once a network is completed.
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Old October 26th, 2007, 02:59 AM   #199
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This summer when I was in Taiwan I rode on the new Taiwan High Speed Rail system. It runs between Taipei and Kaohsiung at 300 km/h. It's not the fastest in the world, but is pretty effective. The ride was completely smooth and no beverages spilled. There were also express and local trains that stop at major/minor stations. And the stations, OMG, they were spectacular! It was like a super-modern airport terminal minus the hassles of security. We can use the THSR and Japan's Shinkansen as a good example for a future USHSR system. Stay tuned for my idea (it will be specatular).....
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Old October 28th, 2007, 12:02 PM   #200
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Until the FRA has some sense and drops a ton of the Tier II regulations such as train mass, Acela's not advancing any time soon. Anything higher than 150mph will actually destroy the tracks because the Acela is so heavy.
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