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Old October 29th, 2007, 03:10 AM   #201
Grygry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyronin View Post
nice job, I never thought of going through Canada to go from NY to Detroit. Instead I would have gone through Cininati.


I think the main problem is that HST wins over plane for travels under 3-4hrs, let's say 1,000 km max.
In this regard I would write off many lines in blue or green through the american west and do more networks in densely populated states like California (with two or three lines around LA), Texas (Dalla Houston, Dallas Austin Sacramento), Florida or in the north east.

Also usually a HSR network must be thought of as two sets of lines, the new ones, and the old ones that must be improved (and electrified in the US) in order to reach the many cities close to the HS lines but not on the lines.
But of course this would take a lot of time to consider all options and draw something good.
Also, it is very important to think of the possible interconnexions between train and plane, et make those lines go through some big airports so that connecting flights get replaced with connecting trains.
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Old October 29th, 2007, 07:13 PM   #202
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If you could design a sophisticated rail system for US cities...
Why bother? It's not like duh USA has any clue as to what it does... ... ...in life.


Sophisticated (ooo! the word gives me goosy goosebumps!) is just some alien in 'mericuh.....
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Old October 29th, 2007, 09:03 PM   #203
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trainrover

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Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
Why bother? It's not like duh USA has any clue as to what it does... ... ...in life.


Sophisticated (ooo! the word gives me goosy goosebumps!) is just some alien in 'mericuh.....
And the award for Biggest Douche Bag goes to.....you guessed it folks!!....trainrover!! This award is given to him because of his outstanding ability to leave lightening fast, bolded, super-enlarged posts that outline his truly moronic, backwards way of thinking. The lack of reasoning or intelligence is impressive folks!! Way to leave a childish post trainrover!!....I'm sure someone out there is proud of you!! Folks.....make sure to throw him a tip next time you see him working behind the counter at Tim Hortons...I think he recommends the Apple Fritter...oh excuse me trainrover...the Beignet aux pommes. In closing, I'd like to further nominate him for the Slinky Award. This award is given to people that pretty much serve no purpose, but are fun to watch roll down a flight of stairs....just like a Slinky!!

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Old October 29th, 2007, 11:54 PM   #204
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Old October 30th, 2007, 07:16 AM   #205
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F***ing Canadians...., it's no wonder why they smoke so much pot and end up in gay marriages.








Laughing Americans

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Old October 30th, 2007, 05:34 PM   #206
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http://www.amtrak.com/servlet/Conten...57347&ssid=180


October 23, 2007
Annual Amtrak Ridership Sets All-Time Record; Fifth Straight Year of Increases

Ridership Tops 25.8 Million, $1.5 Billion in Passenger Revenue
WASHINGTON — Amtrak ridership in Fiscal Year 2007 increased to 25,847,531, marking the fifth straight year of gains and setting a record for the most passengers using Amtrak trains since the National Railroad Passenger Corporation started operations in 1971.

This total, for the period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007, topped the 24,306,965 for the previous 12 months and is greater than the passenger count of 25.03 million reached in 2004, before Amtrak transitioned some services to a commuter rail operator.

Total ticket revenue for the fiscal year, $1.5 billion was an 11 percent increase over the $1.37 billion in FY06. If other income from contract services is included, the railroad's total revenue was $2.2 billion for the fiscal year.

"Highway and airway congestion, volatile fuel prices, increasing environmental awareness, and a need for transportation links between growing communities, are some of the factors that make intercity passenger rail extremely relevant in today's world," said Alex Kummant, President and CEO of Amtrak. "Combined with the efforts of the hardworking men and women of Amtrak who make our service work, our investment in the Northeast Corridor is paying dividends with improved on-time performance (OTP), and that draws in more ridership and revenue.

"Our record setting ridership and ticket revenue in FY07 indicate the stage is set for Amtrak to take on a role as not only a contributor to the nation's transportation network, but as a leader among modes," he added.

East Highlights

Revenue growth was the greatest in the Northeast, where revenue reached $829.3 million, a 14 percent increase over last year's ticket revenue.

The popularity of the Acela Express service continued in FY07 as is evidenced by the 20 percent increase in ridership (3.1 million passengers) and 23 percent climb in ticket revenue ($403.5 million) versus last year. Acela Express service saw an increase in OTP, frequently surpassing its goal of 90 percent. At year-end, the OTP for Acela Express was 87.8 percent, up more than three percent over the same period last year. The popularity and high demand for this service also prompted the creation in July of another weekday Acela Express round trip between New York and Washington.

Regional Service ridership continues also to rise: 6.6 million passengers rode Regional trains in FY07, an increase of 1.2 percent. Additionally, Regional passenger ticket revenue for period rose 7.2 percent.

The Keystone Service, which operates between Harrisburg, Philadelphia, and New York City experienced significant growth with a 20.7 percent increase in ridership, reaching 988,454 in FY07. Moreover, ticket revenue increased by nearly 30 percent, to $20,582,838.

Last fall, Amtrak and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation with support from the Federal Transit Administration, introduced all-electric service with speeds up to 110 mph on the Keystone Corridor, which has reduced travel times between Harrisburg and Philadelphia and Harrisburg and New York City by between 15 and 45 minutes. Weekday roundtrips have also increased from 11 to 14 — with ten traveling through to New York.

The Downeaster, operating daily between Portland, Maine and Boston, Massachusetts, added a fifth round trip to its service this past August. The service achieved a seven percent increase in ridership in FY07, reaching 361,634. The Downeaster also brought in $4.8 million in ticket revenue, a 5.3 percent increase from a year ago.

Central Highlights

Huge gains are tied to increased frequencies in Illinois, with the three routes between Chicago and downstate communities showing large increases. The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) has more than doubled the size of its contract with Amtrak, providing three of the five round-trips on the Chicago-St. Louis corridor and two round-trips each on the Carbondale and Quincy routes, starting late last October.

On the Chicago-St. Louis Lincoln Service corridor, ridership on state trains more than doubled, rising by 108 percent, while total ridership on the corridor rose by 42 percent to 477,888. Ridership between Chicago and Carbondale, the route the Illini and Saluki trains share with the City of New Orleans, is up by 67.4 percent for the state-supported trains and 46 percent for the corridor, totaling 263,809. For the Chicago-Galesburg-Quincy route of the Illinois Zephyr, Carl Sandburg and other trains, ridership has gained 41.4 percent for the state-sponsored trains and 33 percent for the route, with 194,535 passengers.

Also from the Amtrak hub in Chicago is the Hiawatha Service, with up to seven daily round-trips sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation with IDOT. Nearly 600,000 passengers rode the trains between Milwaukee and Chicago last year, an increase of 2.6 percent.

The state-supported routes in Michigan — Grand Rapids-St. Joseph-Chicago Pere Marquette and the Port Huron-East Lansing-Chicago Blue Water — also posted increases. Ridership on the Pere Marquette was up 2.8 percent and on the Blue Water, 3.1 percent.

West Highlights

California's Capitol Corridor service which operates between Auburn and San Jose, carried more than 1.4 million passengers in FY07, a 15 percent increase over the same period last year. Ticket revenue topped $18 million, a 21 percent increase over the previous 12 months. In addition, the San Diego-San Luis Obispo Pacific Surfliner, showed a nine percent increase in ticket revenue, reaching more than $46 million.

National Highlights

Among the trains on the Amtrak national network, the Empire Builder is again the most popular overnight train. With more than a half-million passengers, the daily Chicago-St. Paul-Seattle/Portland train showed an increase of 1.6 percent.

Also, the Auto Train, which operates between the Washington, D.C and Orlando areas, posted a ridership increase of five percent from last year.

Long-distance trains recording above-average ridership performances include the New Orleans-Tucson-Los Angeles Sunset Limited (up 22.1 percent), Chicago-Albuquerque-Los Angeles Southwest Chief (up 5.4 percent) and Chicago-Memphis-New Orleans City of New Orleans (up 3 percent). In addition, the New York-Miami Silver Service trains (Silver Meteor-Silver Star) achieved ridership gains of 6.9 and 5.7 percent respectively and the Palmetto's passenger number jumped by 7.5 percent over the previous 12 months.
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Old October 30th, 2007, 11:20 PM   #207
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Having read some of the comments here you would think things were totally different in Europe, believe me we do have some of the same issues.

People still use planes and coaches to get around Europe.

Go to Victoria Coach Station in London and it will be full of East Europeans taking the European equivalent of the Greyhound home.

We have a network of coaches and buses just like America, which stretches right across Europe.

Taking the train is great if you are going from London to Paris or Brussels etc but not if you are going to Southern Europe or somewhere like Moscow, as by the time you change trains numerous times or have paid for ticket on a sleeper train it becomes more expensive than flying would have in the first place and takes a good deal longer.

A lot of people drive across Europe from the UK taking the high speed ferry routes such as Seacat from Dover (50 mins) to France, and the Eurostar Trains also takes cars (35 mins)

There is a limit on how far it is viable to travel by train before the plane becomes the more sensible option.

Cheap Airlines such as Easyjet and Ryanair etc have revolutionised European Travel and it now costs very little to fly between most European destinations.












Last edited by Jaeger; October 31st, 2007 at 09:45 PM.
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Old October 31st, 2007, 12:28 PM   #208
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Funding boost for Amtrak

Finally the US Senate is looking at boosting rail service investment.


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1193..._us_whats_news


For Amtrak, the Climate Changes
By Christopher Conkey and Daniel Machalaba
Word Count: 821
Momentum is growing in Congress to bolster Amtrak and help states expand rail service as lawmakers grow concerned over global warming, transportation gridlock and high oil prices.

In what may signal a reversal of fortune for the nation's intercity passenger-rail network, the Senate yesterday approved a six-year, $11.4 billion bill that would authorize nearly $2 billion a year in Amtrak funding, up from roughly $1.3 billion now. The measure passed by a 70-22 vote.

The bulk of the bill's funding would go toward operating expenses and capital projects, but $1.8 billion would be devoted to paying off debt, and $1.4 ...
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Old October 31st, 2007, 12:43 PM   #209
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^

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washing...11648298_x.htm

Hey the USA Today has the same article for FREE
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 01:27 AM   #210
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About damn time. Other nations already have electrified passenger rail systems and we're still polluting the air with cars and airplanes. I mean, Japan had the Shinkansen back in the '60s, and we had just bombed the hell out of them (no offense). We are falling behind.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 04:19 AM   #211
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Guys, don't diss all Canadians for this troll.

Anyway, this is how my plan would look on a map. Black line is the Northeast corridor, which could be further improved in areas to make speed faster, and the red lines are the spur lines that I was talking about.

Come to think about it, extending lines to Pittsburgh, Buffalo/Rochester, and Montreal don't look too bad, although that will never happen in itself. Many of these red spur lines would need MAJOR work. I am not sure about the other ones, but the Hartford-New Haven line is not even electrified yet.


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Old November 2nd, 2007, 08:00 AM   #212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TenRot View Post
Guys, don't diss all Canadians for this troll.

Come to think about it, extending lines to Pittsburgh, Buffalo/Rochester, and Montreal don't look too bad, although that will never happen in itself. Many of these red spur lines would need MAJOR work. I am not sure about the other ones, but the Hartford-New Haven line is not even electrified yet.

I was thinking of a route from New York - Buffalo - Toronto - Montreal route and maybe a branch route from Toronto to Detroit.
It will definitely create a stronger US-Canada economic bloc and revitalize Detroit.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 04:05 PM   #213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taiwanesedrummer36 View Post
I mean, Japan had the Shinkansen back in the '60s, and we had just bombed the hell out of them.
I think that they (along with the Europeans) had high-speed rail years ago in part BECAUSE we bombed the hell out of them. They had a fresh slate to start out with.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 05:12 PM   #214
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TenRot View Post
Guys, don't diss all Canadians for this troll.

Anyway, this is how my plan would look on a map. Black line is the Northeast corridor, which could be further improved in areas to make speed faster, and the red lines are the spur lines that I was talking about.

Come to think about it, extending lines to Pittsburgh, Buffalo/Rochester, and Montreal don't look too bad, although that will never happen in itself. Many of these red spur lines would need MAJOR work. I am not sure about the other ones, but the Hartford-New Haven line is not even electrified yet.
I certainly wasnt implying anything negative about Canadians....I was just leaving a comment about him as an individual. I love Canada and I'm actually part French Canadian.
Anyway, I think your idea looks great. What I would do, additionally, is add another line from Albany to Montreal. It would be awesome to take a bullet train from NYC to Montreal and vice versa....two great cities better connected!!
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 08:37 PM   #215
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One of the current problems WRT the USA-Canada border (ie, involving Seattle-Vancouver, NYC-Albany-Montreal and Buffalo-Hamilton-Detroit routes) is that for some-odd reason, the USA's border guards are very hostile to those crossing it by rail.

Until there is an EU-style customs union and 'open' border put into place, I don't foresee that changing anytime soon.



OTOH, with the way commercial aviation is fast becoming an insurmountable hassle, domestic routes in the 500-1000 km range seem to me to be primed and ready for some sort of high-speed passenger rail development (even routes as long as NYC-Chicago) - if the money can be politically found to develop them. Those routes were ALL operated at amazing rail speeds and service quality and frequency before air travel become popular, too.

As for freight rail service in North America - it is going great guns and many routes are operating above capacity. The private freight railroad companies are now constantly investing incredible amounts of money into upgrading and expanding their systems to handle it all.

Current rail freight and passenger activity patterns are directly opposite between North America and the EU.

Mike

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Old November 2nd, 2007, 09:40 PM   #216
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Yeah, except for the obvious reasons (for money and the drive to do it), there isn't that much of a reason why all these cities are already connected better. They have rail already.

HSR to Toronto and Detroit does sound like a great idea. If it ever happens (which it likely will not), we could even connect the hypothetical HSR network in the East Coast, to the plans in the Midwest!
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 10:52 PM   #217
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We have more roller coasters than rail networks here. People in the "United States of Whoremerica" view rail as an amusement ride and not as a necessity. The Northeastern US and Chicago are less car dependent than the rest of the nation.
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 01:54 AM   #218
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The Acela only goes 70 mph along the CT shore and that could be improved. It's already competitve with air for Bos-NYC; NYC Philly; NYC-DC; Pilly-DC. All of the largest cities in the northeast have extensive commuter rail and Bos, NYC and DC have large subway systems. Regional (slower) trains already ply the routes mentioned by 10rot in PA, VA and new Eng. Has anyone ever taken the Acela or a commuter rail line? Boston alone has something like 13 lines some of which go over 50 miles.
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 02:23 AM   #219
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Dallas/San Antonio/Houston definitely needs a rail link, but the next problem is that the cities are so big that you would need a car once you got there. Dallas has the largest in-city public transportation system and even it doesn't reach many places. Houston is so monstrous that even the city bus system doesn't go into the suburbs much.

If there was competent public transportation in those cities, the trains would be full every weekend.
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 09:09 PM   #220
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Texas is so flat and open high speed rail could be cost effective to build. The trains could stop once in each city at a station with bus, rental and zip cars. It could work but since air is so fast and driving is pretty easy getting to the center of the city won't have the benefits it has in the northeast or europe.
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