daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 6th, 2009, 08:29 PM   #1581
EC 120 Košičan
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Opava
Posts: 10
Likes (Received): 0

METSFAN: Not know what the track will be? Or they will train units deployed on these routes eg: drive train TGV, Thalys, ICE, etc.?
EC 120 Košičan no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 7th, 2009, 06:18 AM   #1582
ranieri
Registered User
 
ranieri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 18
Likes (Received): 5

Shea

MetsFan. I rode my bicycle all through the inside of Shea while it was being built. I lived in Flusing and it was a nice ride to the Shea/World's Fair site. Also, believe it or not, I was born 12 blocks away from Yankee Stadium in 1953. I never steped inside the place once as my father never went to baseball games. He was a Cleveland Brown's fan.
ranieri no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2009, 07:23 AM   #1583
He Named Thor
Just kidding.
 
He Named Thor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Beautiful Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 673
Likes (Received): 50

Quote:
Originally Posted by EC 120 Košičan View Post
I read that President Barrack Obama has approved several billion dollars to high-speed rail and Amtrak receives a billion currently. will Amtrak buy some newer types of electric trains, locomotives, etc.?

http://opava-vlaky.blog.cz/
Quote:
Originally Posted by metsfan View Post
That is the plan.

- A
Actually, outside of California (which has been planning hsr since well before Obama) I hadn't heard anything about electrifying any additional lines.

Most of the stuff going on Kosican, has to do with:
1. Upgrading the track signaling
2. Refurbishing current rolling stock and repairing out-of-service rolling stock
3. Buying some new rolling stock (the Viewliners, for instance)
4. Adding lines, trips, and capacity.

Again, outside of California I'm not even aware of any plans for new locomotives. A couple of us have mentioned the possibility of using Bombardier's jet powered Acela locomotive, though that is nothing but speculation.



But man would it be cool.
__________________

ChuckScraperMiami#1 liked this post
He Named Thor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2009, 10:09 PM   #1584
EC 120 Košičan
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Opava
Posts: 10
Likes (Received): 0

I was just typnul. As I looked at your site and your bozový park, so I think it would be appropriate for certain routes to use a smaller amount of electric air conditioning units 1st and 2nd CityElefant class 471 series, but would need to install dependent traction (overhead lines) or upgraded unit 460/560.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ČD_Class_471
http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elektrická_jednotka_460
EC 120 Košičan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 10th, 2009, 08:47 PM   #1585
OettingerCroat
Disenfranchised
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Oakland (USA) // Split (CRO)
Posts: 7,678
Likes (Received): 22

Quote:
Originally Posted by He Named Thor View Post


But man would it be cool.
if this is Amtrak's excuse for high speed rail, they deserve to never get it for real. gas-powered HSR. please... uniquely American all right.
__________________

ChuckScraperMiami#1 liked this post
OettingerCroat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 10th, 2009, 11:50 PM   #1586
mlcorbet2
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1
Likes (Received): 0

MARC Train in Maryland

I'm new to the state of Maryland and I'm just curious as to why the MARC train doesn't run on the weekends. I live in Baltimore, but I have a ton of family in DC and I'm not fond of always having to drive down there to visit them on the weekends. is there anything that can be done to get at least some kind of limited MARC schedule on the weekends??
mlcorbet2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 11th, 2009, 09:13 AM   #1587
He Named Thor
Just kidding.
 
He Named Thor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Beautiful Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 673
Likes (Received): 50

Quote:
Originally Posted by OettingerCroat View Post
if this is Amtrak's excuse for high speed rail, they deserve to never get it for real. gas-powered HSR. please... uniquely American all right.
Well, no. Our excuse for HSR is the actual Acela.



The one you quoted was a sales demo that Bombardier built to try to sell to Amtrak (who didn't buy any).

Unfortunately, getting some people to swallow the idea of just getting our trains to 110mph is proving damn near impossible. Electrifying our tracks (outside of the North-East) as well would be far beyond impossible.

Don't blame me.

As a bit of an aside; the Bombardier jet train, if it were to be used, would be the third jet-turbine powered high-speed Amtrak train. Two others have been used:

The UA Turbotrain


The Turboliner
__________________

ChuckScraperMiami#1 liked this post
He Named Thor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2009, 07:02 AM   #1588
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,450
Likes (Received): 62

It is the essence of a commuter rail line. It's sole purpose is to get people to and from work. I agree there should be weekend service, but that would require (GASP) more government spending!!!!!!
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud

ChuckScraperMiami#1 liked this post
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2009, 05:01 PM   #1589
mgk920
Nonhyphenated-American
 
mgk920's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Appleton, WI USA
Posts: 2,583
Likes (Received): 68

Quote:
Originally Posted by He Named Thor View Post
Well, no. Our excuse for HSR is the actual Acela.



The one you quoted was a sales demo that Bombardier built to try to sell to Amtrak (who didn't buy any).

Unfortunately, getting some people to swallow the idea of just getting our trains to 110mph is proving damn near impossible. Electrifying our tracks (outside of the North-East) as well would be far beyond impossible.
From what I can recall, BNSF was actively studying mainline electrification during the 2008 fuel price spike.

Have diesel fuel go to $2.50/liter instead of the now approx. $2.50/USgallon and see what happens.

Mike
__________________

ChuckScraperMiami#1 liked this post
mgk920 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2009, 09:04 PM   #1590
He Named Thor
Just kidding.
 
He Named Thor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Beautiful Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 673
Likes (Received): 50

Quote:
Originally Posted by mgk920 View Post
From what I can recall, BNSF was actively studying mainline electrification during the 2008 fuel price spike.

Have diesel fuel go to $2.50/liter instead of the now approx. $2.50/USgallon and see what happens.

Mike
But that's just it, the actual freight companies have to do it. If Amtrak tries to heads will roll.
He Named Thor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2009, 06:41 AM   #1591
metsfan
Photographer
 
metsfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Newtown, PA
Posts: 661
Likes (Received): 42

A lot of rail service in the usa on weekends is seriously lacking or not running at all. People are out en masse on weekends, yet that's when service is all reduced. Lame.

- A
__________________
Lets Go Mets!
metsfan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 16th, 2009, 08:58 AM   #1592
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,929
Likes (Received): 18195

Amtrak study says proposed passenger train in Ohio would draw 478,000 riders each year
15 September 2009

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Amtrak said Tuesday that a plan to restore passenger train service among Ohio's major cities would draw about 478,000 riders each year on a route that has key demographics needed for successful operations.

The estimates were included in a draft study that will play an imporant part in Ohio's application for federal stimulus money to launch a 79-mph, startup rail service connecting Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati by 2011.

About 6 million people live along the 255-mile route, making it one of the most heavily populated corridors without rail service in the Midwest. Private train service from Cleveland to Cincinnati ended in the early 1970s.

Amtrak said the corridor's population density and its concentration of colleges and universities are important factors for success. Amtrak has steady ridership support from college students throughout its national system, the study said.

The study also identified $517.6 million in potential costs before service could begin -- $342.6 million for signal upgrades and other improvements to existing freight tracks and $175 million for new trains.

That's more than the $400 million Ohio transportation officials anticipated.

Amtrak's cost estimates are preliminary, said Scott Varner, a spokesman for the Ohio Department of Transportation. Officials will respond to Amtrak's draft study in the next few weeks, and it's unclear if the state will ask for more stimulus money on its Oct. 2 application to the Federal Rail Administration, he said.

Ohio is competing with other states for part of the $8 billion in stimulus money the federal stimulus package has set aside for rail projects.

Long-term plans call for the Ohio route to be part of a Chicago-based Midwest rail corridor, with trains eventually running up to 110 mph and branches connecting other parts of Ohio.

Amtrak's Ohio ridership forecast draws parallels to the agency's 284-mile route from Chicago to St. Louis, which has about 476,000 riders annually. Roundtrip tickets on the route range from $23 to $60. Fares are lower if purchased in advance.

The Ohio study released Tuesday didn't include fare estimates but did project annual ticket sales of $12 million.

Amtrak recommends six stops for the Ohio service: downtown locations in the four major cities, along with intermediate stops in west Cleveland and Sharonville Park north of Cincinnati.

The west Cleveland stop on 150th Street is a smart choice because it would connect with a rapid transit system that can take passengers to nearby Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, said Ken Prendergast, executive director of All Aboard Ohio, a rail advocacy group.

Total travel time on the route would be 6 hours and 30 minutes. That's about what it would take to drive the same corridor, but longer than a more direct route between Cleveland and Cincinnati on Interstate 71 that takes 4 1/2 hours by car.

Time isn't the only factor that determines ridership, Varner said. Cost, safety, reliability and passenger convenience are other important factors. Ohio anticipates that the trains would be equipped with Wi-Fi service.

The Amtrak study also said Ohio would need to spend as much $17 million to keep the service operational each year, a bit higher than the $10 million that state officials anticipated.

Transportation officials expect to use a mix of funding sources to cover the cost, including train advertising, grants and fees that restaurants, hotels and gas stations pay to advertise on blue highway exit signs, Varner said.

Gas tax money would not be used, Varner said. Ohio's constitution requires revenue from the state's 28-cent per gallon gasoline tax to be used only on highway projects.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 16th, 2009, 09:08 PM   #1593
jmecklenborg1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 10
Likes (Received): 0



Streetcar ballot could affect zoo train
By Barry M. Horstman • [email protected] • September 15, 2009


Streetcar opponents hope to stop Cincinnati from spending money on what they dismissively call a "choo-choo train," and could do just that if their ballot measure passes in November, though in a most unusual way.

That's because the choo-choo train in question conceivably could be, not a modern streetcar line from Downtown to Uptown, but the Safari Train at the Cincinnati Zoo.

If that seems, on the surface, absurd, some say it is only one of the ways in which Issue 9 could complicate how the city does business on transit matters, large and small, by requiring public votes before the city proceeds with streetcars or other passenger rail proposals.

"It may sound like a stretch, but it's not an exaggerated argument," said City Solicitor John Curp. "It's a legitimate question."

As the campaign over the Nov. 3 ballot measure begins to hit full stride, one of the crucial questions being debated is how wide its reach could be if voters add it to the city charter.

Those who oppose Issue 9 argue that it could obstruct not only the clearest targets - the $128 million first phase of a streetcar system and major statewide or national rail lines - but even issues such as enhancements at the Museum Center, where the presence of an Amtrak station could trigger the measure's provisions.

Concerns also have been raised over whether the measure, which would bar the spending of "any monies" for passenger rail plans without public approval, could inhibit the city from devoting staff time to apply for state or federal rail grants.

"The language is broad and ambiguous enough to potentially affect a lot of things beyond the obvious," said Don Mooney, treasurer of Cincinnatians for Progress, a group spearheading opposition to the ballot measure. "If this goes on the books, we'll start seeing the lawsuit du jour to figure out what it means or doesn't mean."

Chris Finney, co-founder of the Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST), one of the leading proponents of the ballot issue, contends that those on the other side are "ridiculously exaggerating" the measure's potential impact in an attempt to frighten voters.

"Our opponents want people to believe this would have all kinds of draconian effects," said Finney, who crafted the wording that will appear on the ballot. "They're trying to drum up hysteria rather than talk about what's actually on the ballot - the merits of the streetcar and passenger-rail transportation."

Finney says he does not envision the measure, assuming it passes, ever getting in the way of a new locomotive for the Safari Train or preventing city staffers from drafting applications for rail grants.

"They're taking a sky-is-falling approach because that's the only way they can hope to win," Finney said.

Others suggest that the charter amendment also could create an extra hurdle for seemingly routine business.

"The language opens up a lot of issues," said Curp, whose office ultimately may have to decide how Issue 9 impacts future projects. "It speaks of needing to vote before spending 'any monies' on all passenger rail transportation. So what about the zoo train? It carries passengers and it's transportation on rails, even if it only goes in circles. These are questions that will have to be addressed on a case-by-case basis."
jmecklenborg1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 17th, 2009, 11:01 AM   #1594
Facial
Seeking truth from facts
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Los Angeles / San Diego
Posts: 636
Likes (Received): 10

Interesting article, hkskyline. The number 110 mph is so important everywhere because the diesels can run that fast. They almost never do.

And Wi-Fi must be installed on all Amtrak trains.
Facial no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2009, 05:17 AM   #1595
manrush
Agenda 21 Advocate
 
manrush's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Urban New England
Posts: 4,150
Likes (Received): 499

The MBTA commuter rail

I wonder if there are ever going to be plans to upgrade the MBTA commuter rail.

I mean, the rolling stock is getting a bit dated.

At the very least, we should get DMUs or an electrified network, with cars pulled by surplus AEM-7s.

Damn my wishful thinking.
manrush no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2009, 05:31 AM   #1596
ir desi
Registered User
 
ir desi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hanover, NH, USA
Posts: 647
Likes (Received): 35

Take a look at railroad.net's MBTA forum and the MBTA website. You can see a number of projects in the works.

Upgradation of Fitchburg Line has been approved and is underway, including a new high level double track station at South Acton and extension of double track past West Acton. Waltham Tower will also be eliminated including the gap in the double track. These are expected to scratch 9 minutes off journey times, and more importantly, allow more frequent peak hour services.

Electrification is a little far fetched for any line except Worcester. No line other than this one has the density of traffic to make the investment worth it. DMUs have generally not been implemented due to the scarcity of models available that meet US safety requirements. So far, push-pull diesel service seems to be working fine, and the investment to add a few cars and locomotives into the existing fleet is far less than the cost of building a new fleet.

So yeah, what you are thinking is a bit of wishful thinking. :-)
ir desi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 19th, 2009, 08:34 AM   #1597
manrush
Agenda 21 Advocate
 
manrush's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Urban New England
Posts: 4,150
Likes (Received): 499

Quote:
Originally Posted by ir desi View Post
Take a look at railroad.net's MBTA forum and the MBTA website. You can see a number of projects in the works.

Upgradation of Fitchburg Line has been approved and is underway, including a new high level double track station at South Acton and extension of double track past West Acton. Waltham Tower will also be eliminated including the gap in the double track. These are expected to scratch 9 minutes off journey times, and more importantly, allow more frequent peak hour services.

Electrification is a little far fetched for any line except Worcester. No line other than this one has the density of traffic to make the investment worth it. DMUs have generally not been implemented due to the scarcity of models available that meet US safety requirements. So far, push-pull diesel service seems to be working fine, and the investment to add a few cars and locomotives into the existing fleet is far less than the cost of building a new fleet.

So yeah, what you are thinking is a bit of wishful thinking. :-)

What about using electric locomotives on the lines that are already electrified (i.e. the Attleboro line)?

Apparently, the line that I use to commute into Boston is one of the worst in the entire system (the Fitchburg Line).

Last edited by manrush; September 19th, 2009 at 08:42 AM. Reason: I felt like it
manrush no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 28th, 2009, 03:51 AM   #1598
Woonsocket54
PC LOAD LETTER
 
Woonsocket54's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: East Millinocket, Maine
Posts: 5,644
Likes (Received): 5759

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2001_Cincinnati_riots

Get ready for more!
Woonsocket54 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 28th, 2009, 12:20 PM   #1599
Koen Acacia
Registered User
 
Koen Acacia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: The Hague
Posts: 4,837
Likes (Received): 1917

I suppose this one is going to be shot down with something like a 10-1 margin, right?
__________________
Every time I agree to Terms & Conditions without reading them first, I picture Johnny Rotten giving me a big thumbs up.
Koen Acacia no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 4th, 2009, 11:28 PM   #1600
Rail_Serbia
Registered User
 
Rail_Serbia's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Beograd
Posts: 963
Likes (Received): 668

From Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cincinnati

Quote:
According to Forbes Magazine, Cincinnatians spend 20% of their income on transit, which makes the city the sixth most expensive city for commuting in the United States.
This is relatively hard argument.
Bus cannot take people out of cars, only railways (streetcars, LRT, subways, commuter rails...). What does Cincinnati waiting for? I am in Europe and in city with not so good streetcars, but the streets with streetcars are trade backbones of the city. When anything on the roads don`t move because roads are congested, streetcars are moving anyway.

Last edited by Rail_Serbia; October 4th, 2009 at 11:38 PM. Reason: Gramatic mistakes
Rail_Serbia no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
marc, rail, train

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium