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Old April 23rd, 2007, 01:57 AM   #101
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I just ran a lock and tonnage report on the Army's web site. It says in the two months there have been nine commercial barges through the main section of the river and the lock in the last month. They were carrying coal, machinery, and "crude materials."

There were 785 vessels through the lock.
276 commerical
249 recreation
9 light boat
251 other

I don't know what "other" is, maybe military and police and fire. I think "light boat" is canoeists and kayakers.

The place where I live right now overlooks the locks and I see barges through there all the time. Though the statistics above don't show much movement, those were for a cold period part of which was when the river was frozen. I bet traffic picks up in the summer.
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Old April 24th, 2007, 08:55 PM   #102
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But on the north south part of the river near Civic Opera, washington, madison, monroe, adams, etc. - there are massive barges going back and forth quite often. I only see them when I happen to walk by our windows or am crossing the river, but it's at least multiple times a week.

they're normally pushing huge loads of sand or gravel in these large open container type things...

I'm not talking about the small barges they position to fix the bridges, I mean the big ships that are transporting raw materials.
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Old April 25th, 2007, 07:57 PM   #103
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You are correct, there are many more barges which ply the north and south branches of the Chicago River. They serve the industrial facilities along the waterway and its connected canals. They do not venture into the main branch of the river which is where the proposed Chicago River Walk would be located.
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Old April 27th, 2007, 01:03 PM   #104
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River view revival

I guess this is the best thread for this article...

http://www.suntimes.com/classifieds/...iver27.article

River view revival
ROLLING, ROLLING | New neighborhoods pop up like mushrooms on banks of revitalized Chicago River


April 27, 2007
BY CRAIG BARNER Special to the Sun-Times

Jason Cione is experiencing the future of the Chicago River -- and a little bit of its past, too.

Two years ago, Cione, 37, a self-employed interior designer, purchased a condominium on the 31st floor of a 34-story tower in River West's Kinzie Park development on North Clinton Street. His building is only about 200 feet from the west bank of the North Branch.

"The new river walk they've been doing was key" in his purchase decision, he said. City plans call for public access to be developed paralleling the entire length of the river.
Like a lot of singles, Cione enjoys the urban lifestyle in the River West neighborhood. New eateries -- restaurants, delis and bakeries -- are opening on Grand Avenue, and a park is being developed on the river's east bank near Kingsbury and Erie streets.

"You get phenomenal views and you're very close to the Loop, but without having to fight the traffic," he added.

Fittingly, perhaps, given the river's industrial heritage, odors from the nearby Blommer's Chocolate factory occasionally drift through his neighborhood.

"The smell is terrible," he said. But other pleasures of river side life provide a more than adequate counterbalance.

Fur trappers to professionals

Think of denizens of the Chicago River, and fur trappers, canal diggers and stockyard workers come to mind. But look along the river banks these days and you'll see professionals, drivers of the city's current economy, seeking an urban lifestyle with a bit of nature.

Data confirm the large numbers of residences emerging along the river. The number of housing units one block from the Chicago River between 1200 south and 1200 north has risen 85 percent to 10,332 in 2006 from 5,576 in 1996, said Gail Lissner, vice president of Appraisal Research Counselors Ltd., Chicago.

New condominiums and apartments continue to be built, a prominent example being the Lakeshore East development, where 17 buildings -- including three completions -- holding 4,950 housing units are planned between the Main Branch on the north and Randolph Street on the south. Another major development north of the river in Streeterville is River East, where seven high-rises are complete and six are in planning.

Indeed, projections show the number of housing units is expected to increase 22 percent through 2009, to 12,653, Lissner said.

"The river has great attraction in the market," Lissner added. "I call it our new lake."

Rising on the South Branch are town houses and single-family homes; on the North Branch sprouts the Belmont River Club.

In May, Rohanna Mehta, 39, a fund-raising consultant, and her husband, Carl Ververs, bought a house on the 5700 block of North Jersey Avenue in the River Residences development in Hollywood Park. Their 5-bedroom house is only 200 feet from the river, which they think is ideal for raising their 4-year-old son, Luca Ververs.

"We wanted green space, and there's place for him to run," she said of her boy.


A cleaner river
More buildings are popping up along the river because the water quality is better.
Like many old cities, Chicago was built with a combined sewer system for rainwater and sewage. Effluent would discharge into the river after a rain.

"I would have to say property along the river at one time might not have been held in much higher value -- and maybe lower value -- than other areas of the city," said Joseph Sobanski, chief engineer with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago. "I think now the reverse is true."

In 2006, the tunneling portion of the 109-mile-long Deep Tunnel project -- formally, the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan -- was completed after 30 years of construction.

This means that effluent is channeled via the Deep Tunnel to treatment plants unless a torrential downpour causes overflow.

Samples taken before the Deep Tunnel found only 10 species of fish in the river, said Cathy Hudzik, assistant to Mayor Daley. Recent samples have found 69 species, including sensitive game fish like largemouth bass and bluegill. "The Chicago River generally meets the standards that apply to it across the board," Hudzik added.

The exception at times is the standard for dissolved oxygen, especially around the Bubbly Creek area of the South Branch near Ashland Avenue between Pershing Road and 27th Street.

"Because the river flows backward, there is not much flow through there," she added. Aeration stations are on the river to pump oxygen into it.

Another major factor in the river's improvement was the Clean Water Act that Congress approved in 1972, said Margaret Frisbie, executive director of Friends of the Chicago River, an advocacy group. The ruling prohibited point-source pollutants, like industrial waste, from going into the river.

Finally, chlorine has not been used since the mid-1980s as a disinfectant for effluent, Frisbie said.

Friends of the River supports residential development along the river provided public access and wildlife are protected. The organization is developing conservation-based design guidelines to be published in early 2008.


Wildlife, other perks
You can see wildlife all along the river, Frisbie said, including beavers, minks, herons, muskrats and snapping turtles.
Other perks include private river access, trails and the view itself. Buyers on the river -- unlike many seeking a view of Lake Michigan -- are virtually guaranteed that no new building will rise to block their view.

Typically, low-floor condos have better river views than those on higher floors, Appraisal Research Counselors' Lissner says.

If you're thinking of buying, clarify which spaces of a condominium property are private and which are held in common. "You have to be careful how documents are written," said Beth Ryan of Ryan Realty & Associates Inc. , Chicago, who sells units along the river.


Despite the sometimes overpowering smell of chocolate. Jason Cione has no regrets and is enjoying life along the river. "It's nice when you have breakfast in the morning and see the tour boats going through," he said.

Craig Barner is a Chicago-based real estate writer.
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Old July 7th, 2007, 05:30 AM   #105
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Chicago's Riverwalk gains food, services

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed

Chicago's Riverwalk gains food, services
Mayor Daley touts plans to extend pedestrian way around bridges


By Gary Washburn
Tribune staff reporter
Published July 6, 2007, 8:06 PM CDT

Seeking to steer the Chicago River toward a new era, Mayor Richard Daley on Friday welcomed seven summertime businesses to the river's banks and outlined plans for $50 million in downtown enhancements.

The businesses, including five cafes, will operate outdoors, but Daley ultimately hopes to line the river with permanent shops and restaurants and make the Riverwalk pedestrian-friendly for its full milelong stretch between Lake Shore Drive and Franklin Street.

"As far as I'm concerned, this is just the beginning," he said. "Over the next few years we intend to attract additional vendors and work with the private sector to build year-round concession facilities along the Riverwalk."

The city three years ago sought a master concessionaire to lease and manage riverfront retail spaces, but the effort proved unsuccessful.

Asked about the establishment of permanent shops and restaurants, Daley said, "You don't want to jeopardize the vendor bringing them down here if there is no business, so you really have to market this, and that is what we are trying to do."

Several restaurateurs operated on the river's south bank downtown during the warm months of 1998 and 1999, but the reconstruction of Wacker Drive, which runs along the river, put a temporary end to retail operations.

The new eateries will offer fare ranging from French cuisine to hot dogs. They will be joined by Bike Chicago, a bicycle rental; Women-Eye, which sell arts, crafts and souvenirs made by low-income businesswomen; and a water taxi service operated by Shoreline Sightseeing.

The Riverwalk now is broken up by bridge structures between Michigan Avenue and Franklin, but the city is planning to build eight permanent under-bridge pathways extending into the river by 15 or 20 feet to allow pedestrians to walk the full length. The Michigan Avenue pathway is in the design phase, but each structure will cost an estimated $5 million, and officials said the construction timetable will be dictated by their ability to obtain federal funds.
[email protected]



Copyright © 2007, Chicago Tribune
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Old July 7th, 2007, 07:13 AM   #106
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Tribune photos with above article..









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Old July 7th, 2007, 10:00 PM   #107
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The Chicago River has so much potential. I would love to see it developed more....
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for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
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Old July 7th, 2007, 10:44 PM   #108
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Riverwalk is reborn

http://www.suntimes.com/news/politic...iver07.article

Riverwalk is reborn
DOWNTOWN | City touts new restaurants, floats hopes for future


July 7, 2007
BY DAVE NEWBART Staff Reporter

Unveiling what they hope will someday become a new tourist destination on par with Millennium Park, city officials reopened the Chicago Riverwalk on Friday, showing off several new restaurants.

Officials expressed hope the walk could someday feature year-round businesses, floating eateries and an uninterrupted path from Lake Michigan to Franklin.

Mayor Daley was so excited about the refurbished venue that he even referenced his father’s famous declaration in 1970 — when the river was considered a “sewer” by many accounts — that people would someday fish and swim in it.

“Everybody laughed at him,” Daley said Friday. Now people can be seen fishing up and down the river.

The mayor even said he would eat fish caught from its banks.


“Sure, why not,” he said. “. . . Maybe I have. I don’t know.”


Despite the mayor’s optimism, however, an expert said eating the fish would still be at your own peril, even if the river is way cleaner than in 1970.

“We don’t really recommend it,” said Craig Coit, president of Friends of the Chicago River. “There is too many issues with the water quality.”

Still, Coit heartily endorsed the revamped Riverwalk, which cost the city just under $1 million to fix — including funds for fencing, railings, benches and concrete work.

Visitors won’t be able to truly walk from Lake Michigan to Franklin — without hiking up and down a lot of steps — for several years. The city estimates it will cost upward of $50 million to construct walkways around the eight bridges spanning the targeted area. Construction on the first project, around the Michigan Avenue bridge, could start sometime next year if the city can secure $5 million in funding, said Michelle Woods of the Department of Transportation.

Four restaurants — O’Brien’s, Robinson’s Ribs, Mustard and Onions Grill and Caffecafe — have set up shop within the last few weeks. Cyrano’s Cafe will open shortly.

Mustard and Onions Grill owner Scott Krause said he has averaged 30 to 40 additional customers daily since opening. His trailer sells polish sausage and pork chop sandwiches, hamburgers, hot dogs and the like.

Under their contracts with the Chicago Park District, the vendors pay 5 percent to 10 percent of their gross sales in fees. That’s different from restaurants that opened in 1998, when four riverside vendors didn’t reach a benchmark $300,000 in sales and thus didn’t have to make payments. Those eateries all but disappeared after the Wacker Drive reconstruction project.

The new walkway also includes bike rentals and Women’s Eye crafts shop.

Old man Daley’s called shot

When Mayor Richard J. Daley launched an effort to clean up the Chicago River in June 1970, his idea was viewed as “preposterous,” according to one news account.

The river at the time was a “giant sewer,” a headline read. But Daley stuck to his guns after declaring, “I hope to God all of us will live to see the day when we will be fishing in the Chicago River.

“There’s no reason why we shouldn’t. It’s a beautiful body of water if we can purify it. We can stock it with perch and bluegills and bass and coho, and you’ll go off on your noon-time and it will be a wonderful thing.

“Maybe some day we can have a bicycle path down the river with connecting parks, and at lunchtime you can ride a bicycle and see ducks, or possibly swans.”

In some ways, the mayor was prophetic. The number of fish species in the river has grown from 10 to nearly 70, according to Friends of the Chicago River. Those include alewife, black bullhead, black crappie, bluegill, brook trout, carp, channel catfish, chinook, coho salmon, creek chubb, largemouth bass and yellow perch.

Dave Newbart
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Old July 8th, 2007, 05:20 AM   #109
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Quote:
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The Chicago River has so much potential. I would love to see it developed more....
george, i'd go as far as saying that our riverfront is as unique as our lakefront. we have the only truly man made canyoned river in the entire world. it should be made to life up to that potential you describe.
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Old July 8th, 2007, 11:19 PM   #110
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I agree with its all potential. The one thing for me that is hard to grasp is when there is how small the spaces are. I really don't see much space have any real or dining space for anything other then some very cozy bars.
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Old August 9th, 2007, 09:20 PM   #111
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Has anyone eaten at any of the riverwalk restaurants yet? I walked by a couple places on my way back from lunch today....it definitely seems like a good place to eat lunch/dinner at on a nice day....
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Old August 14th, 2007, 01:55 AM   #112
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Quote:
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Has anyone eaten at any of the riverwalk restaurants yet? I walked by a couple places on my way back from lunch today....it definitely seems like a good place to eat lunch/dinner at on a nice day....
I have. At the trailer on the west side of the Dearborn Street bridge. I only had a root beer float, but it was very good.

The guys running the joint were very friendly and attentive. There was a huge line, even though it was a Wednesday. Most people were getting hot dogs and fries.

I want to go back and try something on the menu called a "horseshoe." It's a pork chop on top of a pile of fries covered in gravy and cheese.

It looks like the city has hired security to keep an eye on the area and keep the vagrants out. She had an orange vest on and was sitting away from the rest of the crowd half-watching a portable DVD player. Sounds like a good way to keep the place from smelling like urine while also giving jobs to a few people from the city's unskilled labor pool.

Speaking of urine -- they have port-o-johns there. I used one. It wasn't horrible. Not as good as at the Taste, but good enough to get by.
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Old October 2nd, 2007, 12:23 AM   #113
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I've lived in San Antonio for the past 5 years before I moved away recently. First off don't worry about copying the SA river walk, all the chicago renderings look original and it would be hard to copy it anyway, don't think it's copying just due to the fact that you are building a river walk, WACO has a river walk to, although it sucks. I think that fact that chicago has beaches and will have a nice riverwalk, with a world class skyline and great new residential buildings in downtown including the spire is going and as long as you do the river walk right, it'll be an untouchable city. Look at the San Antonio river walk and learn from it, as you walk along you will find ice cream places, tourist shops, chocolate shops, a huge shopping mall that you can enter right off the riverwalk, convention center, many restaurants and some bars, when you're in San Antonio you feel like the city is completely alive with things to do, the only thing San Antonio lacks is a large down town population that lives there and anything close to a real sky-scraper. Also I think chicago should utilize all of it's river front in the river walk eventually. San Antonio is still extending theirs and a public riverwalk park extends into the neighborhoods along the river and it's continuous. Make the park along the chicago river continuous into the suburbs and it'll be world class.
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Old October 2nd, 2007, 12:30 AM   #114
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Make the park along the chicago river continuous into the suburbs and it'll be world class.
Great idea in theory, but very unlikely given that large portions of the riverfront are heavily industrialized.
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Old October 2nd, 2007, 02:12 AM   #115
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A down-the-road, visionary goal would be to extend it north to goose island, and south to roosevelt, maybe as far as cermak on the east bank of the south branch. Going further than that is unnecessary, and not even all that desirable. It'd be cool if in some areas the riverwalk is only on one side, forcing people to cross the river on existing bridges, or even building one ped only bridge somewhere along the river- preferably north branch just two or three blocks north of wolf point.
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Old October 2nd, 2007, 03:02 AM   #116
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The Chicago River is the best urban waterway in the world.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 02:38 AM   #117
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December Landmarks Commission

Michigan Avenue Bridge and Riverwalk (Michigan Avenue Bridge and
Wacker Drive Esplanade)

Applicant: City of Chicago, owner
John Fried, Ross Barney Architects

Proposal: Proposed construction of an under-bridge walkway connecting south-end riverwalk
levels, and related landscaping and lighting improvements; and replacement of
upper-level bridge railing and flag poles with a more historically-appropriate railing.

Staff recommendation: Staff recommends that the Committee find that project, with the
following conditions, will not have an adverse effect on the
significant historical and architectural features of the landmark
district and approve the project, subject to these conditions and
Landmarks staff review and approval:

1. As proposed, the new railing design for the upper-level bridge
railing will match the historic railing design as closely as possible
while meeting code requirements. The railing handrail may
incorporate built-in lighting. Railing and lighting details shall be
submitted for Landmarks staff for review and approval prior to
permit approval;
2. As proposed, the flag poles on the bridge may be retained and
may incorporate lighting. Flag pole attachment details and
lighting details shall be submitted for Landmarks staff review and
approval prior to permit approval; and,
3. Other bridge and river walk lighting details shall be submitted for
Landmarks staff for review and approval prior to permit approval.
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Old December 13th, 2007, 04:39 PM   #118
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http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/6...walk13.article

Riverwalk cafes to sell booze, Daley proposes
December 13, 2007
BY FRAN SPIELMAN


Chicagoans would be able to stroll along the city's emerging riverwalk with a beer or a glass of wine when the weather turns warm, thanks to a new liquor license proposed by Mayor Daley Wednesday that would allow riverwalk cafes to sell booze.

"Development of the Chicago Riverwalk as a hospitality venue will enhance the image of the Chicago River as an attractive waterfront destination for residents and tourists," the mayor said in a news release.

To qualify for the new license, businesses would have to be licensed to sell food and liquor at another location in Chicago. Booze could be served at cafes along the south bank of the Chicago River between Lake Street, Lake Shore Drive and Wacker Drive between the hours of 11 a.m. and 11 p.m.
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Old December 14th, 2007, 06:10 PM   #119
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Quote:
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http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/6...walk13.article

Booze could be served at cafes along the south bank of the Chicago River between Lake Street, Lake Shore Drive and Wacker Drive between the hours of 11 a.m. and 11 p.m.
Awesome! I love booze!
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Old December 14th, 2007, 09:18 PM   #120
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Quote:
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http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/6...walk13.article

Riverwalk cafes to sell booze, Daley proposes
December 13, 2007
BY FRAN SPIELMAN


Chicagoans would be able to stroll along the city's emerging riverwalk with a beer or a glass of wine when the weather turns warm, thanks to a new liquor license proposed by Mayor Daley Wednesday that would allow riverwalk cafes to sell booze.

"Development of the Chicago Riverwalk as a hospitality venue will enhance the image of the Chicago River as an attractive waterfront destination for residents and tourists," the mayor said in a news release.

To qualify for the new license, businesses would have to be licensed to sell food and liquor at another location in Chicago. Booze could be served at cafes along the south bank of the Chicago River between Lake Street, Lake Shore Drive and Wacker Drive between the hours of 11 a.m. and 11 p.m.
That's a really good idea. By the way I love how they keep calling it BOOZE instead of just alcohol.

I think this would sit very well with both tourists as well as all the office workers. You can get a lot more money and keep people at your cafe's much longer if it's possible to just sit and sip on some cocktails or have beers. This will be especially huge with the office crowd after work on nice days...
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