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Old August 23rd, 2005, 02:12 AM   #21
Latoso
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I love the last one. It gives a great heads-up as to what it'll look at from pedestrian level. Absolutely soaring!
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Old August 23rd, 2005, 04:14 AM   #22
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^ That massing model is pretty cool. Tell me, though, what software did you use to build it? Straight ACAD or something fancy schwanky?
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Old August 23rd, 2005, 04:26 AM   #23
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^3D Studio Max, keep in mind that this is far from he final product. I'm currently in the process of drawing and applying textures and the final product will be a physical model 100% to scale with 20+ other buildings in Chicago and around the world.

BTW Isn't the angle from the northeast and southwest really cool? The tower becomes extremely narrow and distorted-looking.

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Old August 25th, 2005, 01:07 AM   #24
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Concrete pump


Worker dropping the concrete from the pump into framework for a sheerwall within the garage below the Wabash Avenue viaduct



Driving down sheet piles to expand the excavtion hole for the tower
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Old August 25th, 2005, 01:20 AM   #25
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^ Damn, this is one complicated ass project!
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Old August 25th, 2005, 02:14 AM   #26
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There are six phases to every project 1) enthusiasm, 2) disillusionment, 3) panic, 4) search for the guilty, 5) punishment of the innocent, 6) praise for the non-participants. - Guy Tozzoli
Build your own Model Skyscrapers** New World Trade Center (2006-) 3D Model ** World Trade Center (1971-2001) 3D Model
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Old August 25th, 2005, 02:32 AM   #27
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It's a beauty!
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Old August 25th, 2005, 08:51 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STR
If only those buildings really were grouped together like that.
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Old August 25th, 2005, 10:51 PM   #29
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^Yeah, it'd totally ruin the 90th floor view someone paid so much for.
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Old August 26th, 2005, 01:04 AM   #30
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^
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C.B.P. - Citizens for Better Planning

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Old August 26th, 2005, 01:05 AM   #31
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I know this is 'neither here nor there' but given that Trump, Jr is in charge here, how do they involve Bill Rancic in this project, or do they?
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Old August 27th, 2005, 02:22 AM   #32
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I read an article on the Apprentice winners a while back. Apparently most of their time is spent at public appearences (and the like) promoting the "Trump" brand and show. I'd be very surprised if Bill Rancic had a serious role in building the project. Its not like the guy had a real estate/construction/developer background when they chose him to "lead" this project.

Trump Jr on the other hand grew up in this business and I'm sure is being groomed for the top job. Besides who better than your son to be the hands on guy for this?
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Old September 1st, 2005, 07:39 AM   #33
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I'm no good at these updates compared to some of the other forumers, but I'll do my best from time to time.

Anyway, I walked past the site again today. I no longer work in the IBM building, so its been a few days since I strolled through whats left of the plaza there. Got a chance to talk with a couple of the guys working on the roadway, which, as you can imagine from the pictures, isn't difficult anymore, since the roadway is less than 8 inches below plaza level. Two weeks was the best guess they all floated for the road to be joined to the bridge proper.

I know less than anything about the construction of major viaducts, and there's only about a foot of space between the exisiting road structure and the bridge, but at least construction is on pace for the November 1st reopening of Wabash Avenue.

In other news: the hole keeps on a growing.

And they're making some great progress at the Vietnam War Memorial, though it might be a bit much to expect them to complete it by veteran's day.
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Old September 4th, 2005, 07:55 PM   #34
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just anouther artical about the trump tower --------------

REAL ESTATE

Giant born among towers

By By Stephanie Murphy, Daily News Business and Real Estate Writer

Sunday, September 04, 2005



CHICAGO — For well over a century, the city and especially the Chicago River captivated the imagination of the world's leading architects, who designed one edifice after another, lining the cradle of the modern skyscraper with now-vintage landmarks.

Under construction since March, the $750 million Trump International Hotel & Tower will be the tallest building in the United States since the Sears Tower was finished in 1974. Designed by Adrian Smith, a partner with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, it also will be the city's first megatower in three decades. Based in the city, the international firm also designed the Sears Tower and the John Hancock Tower in the 1960s.

Also called Trump Tower Chicago, the 95-story skyscraper is being built where the seven-story Chicago Sun-Times building once stood. Earlier this summer, crews began digging 125 feet to bedrock at the site, which flanks the Chicago River at its heavily trafficked Michigan Avenue Bridge.

Some regret that the squat, boxy newspaper building was demolished, but far more say it had outlived a perch at the city's visual hub. The reflective glass and stepped facade of developer Donald Trump's tower was chosen to showcase historic buildings in the vicinity, its designers say, creating a mirrored panorama for the throngs who stroll across the bridge.

"Where Trump is putting his building is the most sensational location," said Marilee Wehman of Palm Beach and Chicago. "That bridge is the absolute center of the city."

Last October, Trump sealed the deal for the parcel. He invested $73 million in prime riverfront land, where neighbors include the historic Wrigley Building, the Chicago Tribune tower and Mies van der Rohe's IBM Building.

The negotiation for that parcel "wasn't easy," Trump said Thursday. "I owned 50 percent and then bought out [the Sun-Times]."

Developing in Chicago is "a much faster, saner process than New York," Trump said. "There's much less bureaucracy, and it's a very positive thing."

The location "has always been the best site in Chicago," he said. "It's a very special building because of the size and the location. But I love 'em all."

The idea of a Trump tower initially drew scepticism among some Chicago architecture critics who expected "glitz" based on the developer's casinos, Smith said. That tension evaporated, especially after Mayor Richard M. Daley won the final round relating to the tower's spire, Smith said.

At the outset, the tower was to be much taller, about 2,000 feet. On Sept. 11, 2001, Smith was preparing to show some ideas to Trump's associates when they heard reports about a plane crash at the World Trade Center. Two weeks later, Smith's revision was 1,362 feet, including a double spire.

"Trump didn't like it. He asked for a stronger spire. Two years went by, and he said he liked it better without the spire. Daley said, 'No,' he wanted the spire. The mayor won, because the plans had been approved with the spire," Smith said. "Donald Trump has his own taste and vision. But he is a pragmatist, also a romantic, to some degree. I found working with him pretty delightful. He listens, and in most cases, he agrees."

Configured at a bend in the river, the tower lines up with the locks to the east, which control the flow of water from Lake Michigan. The building's silhouette also repeats the outline of piers that frame the lock system.

Trump Tower will be a mixed-use building of luxury condominium residences and hotel rooms, shopping boutiques, restaurants, a health club, ballrooms and conference center, indoor parking and a 1.2-acre park with 500 feet of riverfront promenade.

There will be 472 condominiums, and 70 percent of the building has been sold. The project has logged $700 million in sales already, at prices from a $500,000 studio to "as big a check as you can write," said native Chicagoan Bill Rancic, the first winner of Trump's reality TV show, The Apprentice. Rancic's job is coordinating the tower project, and this year he signed on for another year with Trump "because I've learned more in the last year than I would have in the next 20 years." Rancic said the project is "great for Chicago, creating so many jobs." Completion in early 2008 is "very realistic," he said.

The curvilinear, multi-tiered building is on a long, narrow site, rectangular but irregular. "The building is all concrete, one of the heaviest buildings in Chicago," Smith said. The tower's setbacks give specific nods to neighboring structures. The one on its east side corresponds to the cornice line of the Wrigley Building.

"The stepping says to the Wrigley, 'I see you, and I'm pulling back my facade to not overwhelm you.' The second one relates to a residential tower on the north," Smith said. The tallest setback reflects the neighboring IBM Building.

The curtain-wall facade combines light silver reflective glass and a latticework mullion system of outset vertical and horizontal tubes made of stainless steel and anodized aluminum.

Public access to Chicago's waterfront is a right protected by mayoral edict requiring buildings next to the water to have setbacks. Trump Tower accommodates with a three-tier landscaped promenade which lifts its mass by 40 feet. The terraced levels descend to the riverfront, and Trump Tower residents will have their own dog-run in the park.

Lower floors will have retail, restaurants and lobbies, topped with nine floors of parking. The mezzanine level and 60,000-square-foot health club is on the 14th floor, just below ballrooms, conference center and the hotel restaurant. Floors 17-27 will be for hotel-condo use, with 286 guestrooms and one- and two-bedroom suites; floors 29-89 will be residential condo units from studio size to three-bedrooms, plus three-story penthouses with up to seven bedrooms. There will be 1,000 indoor parking spaces with a deeded section for residents.

Historians say the city is defined by its waterways, and Trump Tower will have views of both the river and Lake Michigan. Chicagoans take their architecture very seriously, and Trump Tower has drawn its share of mixed and rave reviews. When Skidmore, Owings & Merrill showed the city its first sketches, some thought it was too wide. Smith's revision fared better, although some thought it borrowed too much from the stacked-box system of the Sears Tower. Smith softened the silhouette with curves, which evokes "a sense of a steaming ship of commerce plowing through the city," according to Glass Steel and Stone.

A bright blue banner across the construction site proclaims the coming of Trump International Hotel & Tower.

"Actually, the sign is kind of small, considering whose name is on it," quips a river-tour docent as she points to crews at work, noting "those machines are not going up, they're digging down." They were setting the tower's caissons, or concrete columns sleeved with steel, which transfer the tower structure's load down to bedrock.

Someday, Rancic might be part of changing the Chicago skyline on his own, maybe collaborating with Trump. As he said, "My goal is to take what I've learned and go out on my own. It's not out of the realm to do a project with him."
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Old September 5th, 2005, 07:33 PM   #35
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another article in todays Trib.




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chicagotribune.com >> Leisure >> Tempo
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

TEMPO UPDATE: THE TRUMP TOWER SITE

A SPECTACLE IN PROGRESS
Little things make construction site a home

By Mike Conklin
Tribune staff reporter
Published September 5, 2005


It's 7:59 a.m. on a Tuesday. In one minute, when work starts in this Chicago location -- and not a minute sooner due to noise ordinances -- 500-horsepower engines roar, trucks belching clouds of exhaust pour through gates and hammers, drills and saws add more, piercing sounds to the blue-collar symphony.

This is how an average weekday at the Trump Tower construction site jumps to life. Thousands of pedestrians subsequently stream by, giving the busy, noisy project cursory glances from the IBM Plaza and the specially built walkway over the 400 block of North Wabash Avenue.

There's much more than meets the eye, however. This is a workplace for hundreds of trades people, who, just like the passersby on their way to offices and shops, make it their home away from home.

Barely obvious: It's not as apparent to observers, but the project enjoys a special relationship with the adjacent Chicago River. "This is the best location I've been on," said Debbie Kehle, a caisson laborer. "I worked at McCormick Place before this, but it doesn't compare. The river makes this more fun."

Boaters and early morning kayakers occasionally pull up alongside the retaining wall for closer looks and, before 8 a.m., chats with those on the job. Late on one, hot Friday afternoon, a yacht full of partyers motored by and several women on the top deck mooned the stunned workers.

Table for four, please: Every workday at 7 a.m., 10 a.m., and noon, the canteen truck from Triple-A Services -- affectionately called the "roach coach"-- pulls up on Kinzie Avenue's lower level for those who didn't bring food. The workers get 30 minutes for lunch, plus two 15-minute breaks, and most prefer not to waste time standing in lines in nearby fast-food restaurants.

The truck has assorted baked goods, egg sandwiches and coffee available for breakfast. Lunch offerings include Chinese and Mexican food in addition to sandwiches, barbecued shish kebab chips, Hostess cakes, yogurt and cold drinks.

Pizza, at $2.25 a slice, is the most popular item, according to Rafael Mondragon, who has worked the Trump site from the start. "These guys can be big eaters," he said. "I've seen some spend $15 for lunch."

Thomas Donnell, 38, has been in construction 20 years. While he hasn't spent his entire career operating the huge cranes that dominate the Trump site's skyline, every once in a while it must seem that way.

Donnell has worked 12- to 13-hour shifts almost since the project's start, with only a few days off for bad weather. "In this business, you get in as many hours as you can, when you can," he said.

Sitting at the controls of one of these big monsters, Donnell has to remain perfectly focused operating a set of gears, joysticks, and levers that allow him to pick up and drop -- seemingly on a dime -- heavy items attached to the 30- to 40-foot cables dangling from an equally long boom.

This is precise stuff. He lines up loads -- metal caissons used in the foundation, mostly -- so the boxlike structures can be fitted perfectly into pre-measured holes. He's spent most of the summer on the site in sweltering conditions in his cab, where only a small overhead fan provides circulation. "You get used to it," he said.

As it turns out, Donnell spends a lot more time than this operating a vehicle every workday. He lives in Joliet, a commute of about 100 miles he makes daily by car. "I leave at 5 [a.m.]," he said. "It's not so bad. I've got air conditioning."

California dreamin': While many workers live in distant suburbs such as Plainfield and Grayslake and get to their jobs on the train or in cars like most Loop employees, others, including Bovis Lend Lease (the general contractor) supervisor Archie Smith, travel even longer distances. Smith commutes from Southern California for the few months he's been on the Trump project.

The company puts him up in one of the River North condos leased for such specialists. Every few weekends, he flies to San Diego on Friday night to be with his family, and he returns on Sunday. "My wife and daughters came here for Father's Day," he said. "It was a nice surprise. There's a lot in downtown Chicago to do."

White Sox fans only? Look closely at one of the tallest cranes on the site, and there is a Sox logo painted on a block attached halfway down its long, dangling cable. Workers insist there are Cubs fans in the ranks -- the insignia, they explain, is merely a sign of support for the city's most successful team. Earlier in the year, when the University of Illinois basketball team was making its run in the NCAA basketball playoffs, a Fighting Illini logo adorned this same spot. "Maybe we'll get to paint a Bears logo there this season," said one laborer.

His name is Dave Morse, but everyone calls him "Crazy Dave." A New Hampshire native, he once had his own computer business but now has been in construction for six years.

On this project, Morse, 53, a member of the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 150, is doing caisson work. He serves as an extra set of eyes for the crane operator, perching just outside the cab to make sure nothing collides with the heavy, swaying loads lifted in and out of the holes.

He commutes by bus from his apartment on Marine Drive, which, as it turns out, is an appropriate address for him: Few workers seem to get as big a kick out of the site's closeness to the Chicago River.

"It's amazing the amount of traffic that goes back and forth on the water," said Morse. "Sometimes we can hear the tour boats telling their passengers all about us. That's a kick. Once in a while, when the big sailboats are waiting for the [Michigan Avenue] Bridge to go up, they'll come up next to us for a closer look."
While other workers may appreciate the adjacent river, once in a while Morse takes it a step farther: He has been known to toss a fishing line into the water to see what's biting. "So far, I've pulled out three carp and two catfish," he said.

Chain of command: Tucked from public view are two important command centers. One is in a nondescript, seven-story building a few doors north of the site on North Wabash Avenue where Bovis Lend Lease rents an entire floor. That's where the project's top brass -- general supervisors, vice presidents -- work in offices and conference rooms, and that's where Donald Trump comes to get progress reports.

The other post is in an air-conditioned trailer on the project's east edge. The inside looks like a cluttered, battlefront war room, its walls posted with blueprints and maps.

This is the domain of Bovis Lend Lease administrative assistant Mary Ellen Hyde, who handles ground-level paperwork, relays orders and is a liaison with City of Chicago agencies for unforeseen hang-ups. "I have to anticipate a lot of little things that might not be that obvious," she said. "My husband's a Chicago police officer, so this is up my alley."

How will Dan Bien, a project manager on the Trump effort, spend his Labor Day holiday? At home, "demolishing our master bathroom," he said.

Bien works for Case Foundation Co., a sub-contractor. He's one of the managers you might see carrying a clipboard on the site. It's his job to "communicate with the schedule," make sure the right materials are on hand for each task, track quantities and, in general, serve as a liaison with the general superintendent.

"This is like any corporation, really," said Bien, 31, who lives in Grayslake with wife Carey and their four kids. "You have ambitions. You want to work your way up the ladder."

A graduate of Marquette University, where he earned a degree in civil engineering, and Illinois Institute of Technology, where he earned an MBA, Bien has been interested in architecture and engineering ever since his high school days at Downers Grove North.

"Some day, after the Trump Tower's finished, it'll be very cool to walk by and know you had a role with one of the world's tallest buildings," he said. "I thought it was great when I knew I'd be on it. I brought my 10-year old son down here one day just to show him."

Tree Grows in Brooklyn Dept.: At one corner of the project, near the Bovis Lend Lease trailer, grows a small patch of tomatoes. This is the effort of Giuliano Alciomani, an engineer who's using special seeds imported from Italy. But he's disappointed in the results.

"The plants aren't doing so well," he said. "I think all the vibrations in the ground disturb them."

----------

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Old September 6th, 2005, 12:19 AM   #36
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excellent article - gives the whole construction industry a little more of a human face. Am off to NYC in two weeks for a long weekend, but planning to visit Chicago next year to see how its come on since my last visit in 1998. My Dad lived in Arlington Heights for a year in the late 1980s, so my time there combined with memories of Ferris Bueller's Day Off has given me one hell of an affection for Chicago.
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Old September 6th, 2005, 06:24 PM   #37
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1998? You won't even recognize it
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Old September 7th, 2005, 09:23 PM   #38
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Old September 7th, 2005, 11:55 PM   #39
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Nice work.
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Old September 9th, 2005, 03:41 AM   #40
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Update 09-08-2005

The hole is getting massive, and should be wrapping up work within the next three weeks as these crews are moving fast. Over half of the soil required for excavation has been removed from the site. After excavation is finished, the concrete mat will be poured and our baby will start to rise.


Twisting rebar together on the viaduct


gap between the viaduct and the drawbridge



Parking garage levels below the Wabash Avenue viaduct


notice how far below the water level the pit is now.





Next 3 from from the top of the adjacent Kinze-State-Wabash Self Park Garage.

The last big gap in the viaduct has been caped and is covered in rebar.



Looking east, with Regatta rising in the background

And now the TRENCH a la TRUMP...


tops of the caissons unearthed
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