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Old October 13th, 2005, 07:42 AM   #121
geoff_diamond
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Thanks for the update bvic! Quick question... is the pedestrian walkway gone yet? It looks, from up here, like something's a bit different down there, but, I can't put my finger on it and I simply haven't had time this week to get down there and check it out.

Thanks.
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Old October 13th, 2005, 10:00 AM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoff_diamond
Thanks for the update bvic! Quick question... is the pedestrian walkway gone yet? It looks, from up here, like something's a bit different down there, but, I can't put my finger on it and I simply haven't had time this week to get down there and check it out.

Thanks.

Yes, the walkway was dismantled this past weekend. The sidewalk is now open.
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Old October 13th, 2005, 07:56 PM   #123
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Thanks for the new pics. Boy they are busy little beavers down there. A lot of work was done. Must be having great weather in Chicago.
This is the most interesting phase of the project. Once they get going on the floors it will be the same thing over and over for a while until one of the setbacks.
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Old October 14th, 2005, 05:27 AM   #124
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I just noticed this today when i was at the construction site with Shawn and Urban Politician. A piece of one of the tower cranes has been delivered to the construction site.



They will probably start to erect the crane within the next several weeks.
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Old October 14th, 2005, 08:30 AM   #125
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BADA BING! That was fun to see today. Can't wait to see that erected and swinging around. Its going to be sweet, just imagine both of Trump's two cranes 1150 feet up when this thing is topping out.
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Old October 14th, 2005, 06:22 PM   #126
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Thx for the speedy answer bvic! Are they still planning on having the viaduct reopened to traffic in November?
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Old October 14th, 2005, 10:16 PM   #127
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Thx for the speedy answer bvic! Are they still planning on having the viaduct reopened to traffic in November?
yes, before thanksgiving.
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Old October 14th, 2005, 11:02 PM   #128
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http://www.midwestconstructionmag.co...0510_cover.asp

Cover Story - October 2005


Trump's Tower

Digging The Donald's Chicago Condominium

by Craig Barner

The $750 million Trump International Hotel & Tower is already an important project in Chicago even though it has yet to emerge from the ground.


When it is finished in three years, the 92-story tower will reach 1,360 ft., said Paul James, senior vice president in Chicago of New York-based Bovis Lend Lease, the construction manager. As a result, it will be the Second City's second-tallest building after only the 1,450-ft.-tall Sears Tower.

Moreover, the Trump will probably be the 12th tallest building in the world, assuming each announced project taller than it is constructed according to plan. Ironically, Chicago-based Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLC, the architect, also configured the Burj Dubai tower under construction but not topped out in the United Arab Emirates. Burj is expected to be the world's tallest building even though its height remains a secret to prevent the announcement of a taller project.

Back in Chicago, Trump will have a major impact on the city's skyline due to its height and location on the Chicago River on the former site of the Chicago Sun-Times. Last fall the newspaper departed the North Wabash Avenue location it had called home for 50 years for the nearby Chicago Apparel Center building, and demolition of its former barge-shaped office was completed in the spring.

Thousands will see the Trump daily because of its location next to the river and landmark Wrigley Building and due to its proximity to the Magnificent Mile district. The celebrity of flamboyant developer Donald Trump is stirring further interest.

The project will contribute greatly to the residential flavor of the Michigan Avenue area, a street that is being increasingly compared to New York's Park Avenue due to the large number of upscale high-rise residential projects that have accelerated since Millennium Park opened in 2004.

Tere Proctor, director of sales in Chicago for the New York-based The Trump Organization, said the Trump will hold 758 units - 472 condominiums and 286 hotel-condominiums.

"Sales are ahead of schedule," she added. Indeed, the tower is 70 percent sold even though construction is expected to last through 2008.


A Bedrock Project

The building expected to make a splash on the Chicago skyline is already having a big impact below grade.

Robert Schock, vice president of Roselle-based foundation contractor Case Foundation Co., said the structure's bearing pressure, 250 tons per sq. ft., is reportedly the highest ever in Chicago.

"The city code normally allows only 200 tons per sq. ft. as the maximum value," he said. "They allow that to be increased with a full-scale load test, which we did here."

Because of the structure's 2.6 million-sq.-ft. size, the foundations are partly seated in bedrock to prevent the differential settlement due to pressure from the huge building.

Schock said 57 rock caissons are to be installed to support the tower's core area. In addition, about 160 of the traditional belled caissons are to be set.

Seating the rock caissons requires drilling shafts to a depth of about 110 ft. where the bedrock starts. About 12 ft. of the bedrock is augered to create sockets that hold the foundations' tips.

A carefully choreographed drilling sequence was implemented to install the casings that form the foundations.

After a drill penetrates the earth, 13-ft.-diameter, 20-ft.-long temporary casings are installed. The bit is inserted through each of the temporary casing, and through them, 12-ft.-diameter, 40-ft.-long second temporary casings are inserted.
The shaft is flooded with water and polymer slurry for thickening.

"Once we penetrate below the hard pan layer into the boulder area [atop the bedrock], that's water-bearing and under pressure," Schock said. "If we were to penetrate that in a dry shaft, it would blow in a hurry." Danger would arise because adjacent structures supported on belled caissons could be undermined by the sudden change in earth pressure.

As a result, water stays in the shaft as the drill is inserted to lengthen the shaft for the installation of the 10-ft.-diameter, 80-ft.-long permanent casings with jagged-tooth bottoms.

Once reaching the bedrock, the down-hole hammers use bits that operate like jackhammers, Schock said. They shatter the rock into gravel-size pieces that are sucked to the surface and collected in canisters for emptying.

"This new application of the down-hole hammer has saved us a lot of time," he added.
Grout is inserted between the rock and casing to eliminate voids and allowed to set and form a seal.

"Now we have a tight, safe hole that's fully sealed," Schock said. "We take the water out of the hold and drill the rock sockets."

The 9.5-ft.-diameter, 12-ft.-deep sockets are drilled, and high-strength, 10,000-pound-psi concrete is poured the full length of the shafts.

A 10-Ft.-Thick Mat
Once the foundations are complete, the remaining key sitework elements include excavating about 35 ft. - where the tops of the caissons are - installing earth retention and pouring a 10-ft.-thick concrete slab. The building's concrete columns will rise from the mat.

"The mat is about 4,500 cu. yds of concrete, so it is good-sized," Bovis' James added.

The building will have a two-level partial basement, and earth retention in the form of sheeting with raker beams will be installed to form it.

Once the sitework is done, the building will start emerging, and two tower cranes will be used, James said. Because of the building's size, about 185,000 cu. yds. of concrete will be poured over the course of the project.


$28 Million Penthouses

There will be a range of prices and unit sizes in the building, and the asking prices for the penthouses are an eye-popping $28 million.

The Trump Organization's Proctor said there are 23 layouts that range from 580-sq.-ft. studios to 6,850-sq.-ft. penthouses, and the units will be located on floors 29 through 89. The studios are $500,000.

The hotel-condominium units on levels 16 through 27 range from $815,000 for a studio to $3 million for a two-bedroom unit, she said. Seventeen layouts range from 526 sq. ft. to 2,245 sq. ft. of space.

Parking will hold 1,000 cars, and amenities include a 60,000-sq.-ft. health club, five-star restaurant, ballroom, conference and meeting rooms, Proctor said. The building base will have additional restaurants and retail spaces of an upscale nature.

A 1.2-acre park will be surround the building base, and the park's three tiers will face a walkway on the river.

Why a Viaduct?

Another key element in the project's early going has been the demolition and reconstruction of the Wabash Avenue viaduct. The Wabash bridge was rebuilt during the reconstruction of Wacker Drive in 2002.

Because the original viaduct dated to the 1930s, the Chicago Department of Transportation had planned to demolish it within a decade, said Bovis' James. The Trump Organization learned about the replacement while it was planning the tower.

"To enhance their property and to ensure the viaduct was replaced in time for their opening, [the Trump Organization] agreed to replace the viaduct at Trump expense but to CDOT standards," he added.

About 400 ft. was demolished in January to avoid disrupting holiday shoppers the previous month. A pedestrian bridge was erected between North Wabash Avenue and the IBM Plaza.

James said 120 belled caissons and columns support the viaduct, and the existing network of streets below will be maintained, including Lower Wabash Avenue, Lower Kinzie Street and Lower East North Water Street.


SIDEBAR ONE

The Trump's Timeframe


The schedule might have been among the biggest issues for the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago.

The foundation work started in February and was completed at the end of August, said Robert Schock, vice president of foundation contractor Case Foundation Co. of Roselle.

"We were signed to a pretty aggressive completion schedule," he added.

Case is using three of its largest drill rigs to accelerate the work, and normally the company would have used two rigs. A crew of 25 people is on the project; and a typical employee count would have been 15.

And, the newest drilling tools, such as down-hole hammers, are being used also to keep work going.

Even with these measures, progress is hampered a bit, said Paul James, senior vice president in Chicago of New York-based Bovis Lend Lease, the construction manager. The site's location in the Loop means it falls under noise reduction ordinances that restrict work from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

"There are some exceptions, but generally speaking we're working long days," he added. "They often use Saturdays to service cranes and make up a lost day to bad weather."

SIDEBAR ONE

Safety First


Safety is a primary concern. "We pay for a sheriff's deputy to be assigned 24 hours per day, six days a week [whenever crews are working]," Manthey said. "If something happens on the site, everyone knows to contact this deputy." No major problems have occurred.

The project's budget also includes funds for expansion of the WisDOT traffic operations center's hours. The normal operational hours of 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. have been expanded to be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Collins said 95 percent of the project's work is going on behind temporary barriers. A lengthy closure of the southbound lanes of I-43, with southbound traffic routed to share the northbound lanes, has also helped to provide a safe work environment. When the northbound lanes go under construction, traffic will share the southbound lanes.

"We will always have two lanes open in each direction," he said. He added that some system ramps may go out of service during off-peak hours, requiring motorists to make surface-street detours for connections.

Perhaps the greatest safety feature of the project is WisDOT's community outreach program. Using the Internet and frequently updated brochures, WisDOT describes current work and scheduled closures and offers alternate routes to reduce congestion.

SIDEBAR TWO

Removing Obstacles


Below-grade obstructions "were pretty significant" on the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago, said Robert Schock, vice president of the Roselle-based foundation contractor Case Foundation Co.

It was necessary to remove them to clear paths for the drill rigs to install the rock caissons.

The Chicago Sun-Times was the previous tenant, and "the Sun-Times had a pretty heavy foundation because of the weight of the presses and for paper storage," Schock said. "There were extremely thick slabs and mats with piles underneath."
Chicago-based Brandenburg Industrial Service Co. removed most near-grade obstructions. Hydraulic machinery was used to crunch obstacles, and spoils were pulverized for quick removal.

The belled caissons that had supported the Sun-Times had been dug and set by hand in a long-ago construction era. They were about 6 ft. in diameter with flared bottoms up to 15 ft. in diameter. Some were densely packed at about a depth of 80 ft. and could not be avoided during drilling even though a goal in planning the Trump's columns had been to miss obstructions.

About a dozen existing caissons were cored through to create the space for the caisson shafts.

Another obstruction was the boulder layer at a depth of about 100 ft., and it was cleared with the drill rigs.
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Old October 16th, 2005, 04:59 AM   #129
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Yeah, now having seen this construction site alongside Shawn and Victor, I am quite impressed. This is a gargantuous undertaking and I wish I could drop by more often to watch it
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Old October 16th, 2005, 05:11 AM   #130
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Hey UP, how long are you in town for?
__________________

for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
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Old October 16th, 2005, 05:31 AM   #131
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^ I just left today.

I wish I could have met more of you guys.

We'll have to make a meet of it some time--perhaps I'll try to arrange something next time I come to town
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Old October 20th, 2005, 01:40 AM   #132
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Trouble in Trump deal? Condo sales pace slips

October 19, 2005

BY DAVID ROEDER SUN-TIMES COLUMNIST

Condo sales have gotten harder to come by in Trumpville, that big old tract at 401 N. Wabash where Donald Trump is putting up a 92-story building.

Since spring of 2004, Trump and his local sales force have put out an unchanging estimate of the proportion of units in the building that have been sold. It's been stuck at 70 percent, and many in Chicago real estate are wondering what's happening. A few local developers still hope The Donald will stub some toes on a project they insisted he could never complete.

Tere Proctor, who's in charge of sales for Trump, said business has slackened over the last 12 months. Proctor said that was because there was no sales office near the property. The Trump Organization had a showroom in the old Sun-Times building on the site. But after the building was closed for teardown about a year ago, Proctor had to make do with a windowless office at 900 N. Michigan.

Now, the sales staff is on the 20th floor of the IBM building across the street, with a commanding view of the construction site. Proctor, sales associate at Koenig & Strey GMAC Real Estate, said that helps sell the project and that she's executing contracts on about five units a week. She also noted that units were added to the building in early 2004 when Trump scratched plans to provide office space.

The building's 758 units include 286 hotel-room condos. Proctor said the residential and the hotel condos are selling at about the same rate and that no one is backing out of contracts, which would require them to forfeit earnest money.

Trump talked about completing the building in late 2007, a schedule some thought was unrealistic. Proctor now says residential buyers are being told not to expect delivery until 2008 or maybe early 2009 for the top floors. The hotel units, which are on the lower floors, are still due in late 2007, she said.
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Old October 20th, 2005, 01:45 AM   #133
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Yeah, that article is very stupid. Almost not worth posting even
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Old October 20th, 2005, 01:56 AM   #134
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^ Spyguy, is that wishful thinking? Trump has some serious competition now with 50 East Chestnut, Fordham, etc. So there are about 230 units (condos and hotel condos) left for sale. At 5 a week, they'll be out by this time next year, but I wouldn't write this story off so easily. Might there be good reasons why the real estate community is skeptical of Trump? I wonder whether the higher priced units are better sellers or not....
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Old October 20th, 2005, 02:03 AM   #135
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I'm not saying that this article is completely off. I'm sure sales have cooled off a bit, but considering that he DOES have 70% with such fierce competition with no backouts is quite impressive. So he has to sell roughly 30% of the building in 3 years and is selling about 5 a week. That isn't as much of a disaster as the article makes it seem like.
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Old October 21st, 2005, 12:03 AM   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy999
I'm not saying that this article is completely off. I'm sure sales have cooled off a bit, but considering that he DOES have 70% with such fierce competition with no backouts is quite impressive. So he has to sell roughly 30% of the building in 3 years and is selling about 5 a week. That isn't as much of a disaster as the article makes it seem like.
^I would agree. The important thing is that Trump has already received financing and it will still be another 2 years before the tower is completed. So there's plenty of time to sell those units.

Trump is the last of my worries. My bigger concern is for the well-being of the Waterview Tower, MoMo, and Fordham Spire projects
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Old October 21st, 2005, 01:32 AM   #137
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^ I would agree -- I 'm not too worried about Trump. I'm not concerned with MoMo, because I think the city is simply giving them a hard time to try to push them back into negotiations with Joffrey. I'm a bit more concerned about what this story says about the demand available for other high-end buildings.

Trump must have been pissed off about this story. Even if it isn't true, the story has the power to be a self-fulfilling prophecy. As soon as there's some doubt about a project, potential buyers might reconsider as they don't want to make a commitment to something that might not happen. So Carley and others have to create enough hype to create as much of a self-fulfilling prophecy in the direction of more sales. It is impossible to be a developer of such a major project and not project absolute confidence. I'm glad there's a niche for the super-sized egos in society where they can better it!
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Old October 21st, 2005, 01:50 AM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BVictor1
Okay, okay, geezzzzzz.......Aren't we demanding?

I took these yesterday (10/11/05)

Pouring concrete that will help to form the walls of the core - 2005-10-11


View into the construction site - 2005-10-1


Excavating dirt, clay and other debris from the site - 2005-10-11


Iron workers installing and tying steel rebar - 2005-10-11


Excavators digging out more of the site - 2005-10-11


Workers spreading recently delivered gravel - 2005-10-11
WOW! This thing is growing fast!
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Old October 21st, 2005, 05:19 PM   #139
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoLover
^ I would agree -- I 'm not too worried about Trump. I'm not concerned with MoMo, because I think the city is simply giving them a hard time to try to push them back into negotiations with Joffrey. I'm a bit more concerned about what this story says about the demand available for other high-end buildings.

Trump must have been pissed off about this story. Even if it isn't true, the story has the power to be a self-fulfilling prophecy. As soon as there's some doubt about a project, potential buyers might reconsider as they don't want to make a commitment to something that might not happen. So Carley and others have to create enough hype to create as much of a self-fulfilling prophecy in the direction of more sales. It is impossible to be a developer of such a major project and not project absolute confidence. I'm glad there's a niche for the super-sized egos in society where they can better it!
Good point, Shawn. It seems like that author of that article really should shut the **** up and not try to ruin a good thing. But 5 purchases a week doesn't sound bad to me
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Old October 21st, 2005, 06:37 PM   #140
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Don't I remember seeing somewhere a while back that the cost of the building had already been covered by the units that were sold? That's all we should be concerned about. As long as all the loans get repaid... the building will be completed; the Donald can worry about selling remaining units, and reaping some profit, after completion.
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