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Old August 10th, 2003, 02:52 PM   #1
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Churches of Singapore

A sample of churches in Singapore. I've featured mostly the historical churches, most of them are now national monuments.

St Andrews Cathedral

Saint Andrew's Cathedral at 11 St Andrew's Road, is an Anglican Cathedral, located next to the City Hall MRT. Named after the Patron Saint of Scotland, it is the oldest Anglican House of worship in Singapore. It was designed by Lt-Col. Ronald Macpherson, with detailed work done by John Bennet and construction by Indian convict labourers.


by RafflesCity

Saint Andrew's Cathedral is the second church building on the site of the original Church of St. Andrew, a location selected by Sir Stamford Raffles, in 1823. Many books indicate that there were three church buildings, and this arose from the confusion of two different illustrations of the original building, the first without a tower and spire, and the same structure with a tower and spire later added by John T. Thomson.


by Cliff

The foundation stone of the original church was laid on 9 November 1834. The building was designed by George D. Coleman, in his trademark Palladian style, and constructed between 1834 and 1836. It was named after the patron Saint of Scotland because initial financial support came from the local Scottish community. The first church service was held on 18 June 1837 and was conducted by the first Chaplain Reverend Edmund White. The building was subsequently consecrated on 10 September 1838 by Bishop Daniel Wilson of Calcutta. It had a unique church bell with the words, donated by Mrs Maria Revere Balestier, wife of American Consul Joseph Balestier. Carved on the bell were the words "Revere Boston 1843" and thus it came to be known as "The Revere Bell". A tower and spire designed by John Turnbull Thomson was added between 1841 and 1844. It was struck twice by lightning - first on 25 August 1845 and again in 1849. By 1852, the building was considered unsafe and was closed and eventually demolished.

On 4 March 1856, the foundation stone of the present building was laid by the Right Reverend Daniel Wilson, Lord Bishop of Calcutta. Built between 1856 and 1864 using industrial-trained Indian convict-labourers, construction was supervised by Major J. F. A. McNair. The building's English Gothic influence was designed by Lt-Col. Ronald Macpherson, Executive Engineer and Superintendent Public Works Department with the detailed work by a civil and mechanical engineer, Mr. John Bennet (who also designed the Raffles Lighthouse). Mr. W. D. Bayliss was the superintendent. The structure, 68.58 m (225 ft) long and 35.052 m (115 ft) wide, has a nave, side aisles, a north and south porch, and a roof made of teak and slates. The first service was held on 1 October 1861 and this church building was consecrated on 25 January 1862 by the Right Reverend George E. L. Cotton. In 1870, with the growth of the congregation, the church was elevated to the status of 'Cathedral Church of the United Diocese' by Archdeacon John Alleyne Beckles. On 6 February 1889, a peal of eight bells, named St. Matthew, St. James, St. Paul, St. Peter, St. Thomas, St. Bartholomew and St. Andrew was installed as a gift from the heirs of Captain J. F. Fraser. On 20 June 1891, St. Andrew's Cathedral was struck again by lightning, but no serious damage was noted. The north transept, known as the 'War Memorial Wing', was added in 1952 with the generous donation by the late Mrs Loke Yew. The south transept was added on 1983. On 28 June 1973, St Andrew's Cathedral became a preserved national monument.


Church Dedications and Memorials

Stained Glass windows in the apse are dedicated to Sir Stamford Raffles, John Crawford, and Maj-Gen. W. B. Butterworth
Window at the Cathedral entrance erected in memory of its designer and architect, Lt. Colonel Ronald MacPherson. The MacPherson Monument stands outside, within the church grounds.
Tablets on the north wall, and on one of the pillars on the left aisle, remember victims of the 1915 Sepoy Mutiny in Singapore.
War Memorial Wing dedicated to those who died in World War II, added in 1952, was opened by Mr. Malcolm MacDonald, Commissioner General in South East Asia
A memorial plaque unveiled in 1988, commemorates Malayan Civil Service officials who died.
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Old August 10th, 2003, 02:55 PM   #2
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Armenian Church

The Armenian Apostolic Church of St Gregory the Illuminator, is in the central district, located at Hill Street and bounded by Armenian Street and High Street. It was built by G. D Coleman in 1835, making it the oldest church building in Singapore. It was gazetted as a national monument on 6 July 1973. Although a small community, the Armenians were able to procure land early for the building of this classical structure.


by hyacinthus

The Armenian community in Singapore, which hardly numbered more than 100, had been holding religious services since the early 1820s. With the arrival of the first resident priest Rev. Gregory ter Johannes, in July 1827, a temporary chapel was set up. The first service was held in a room behind John Little & Co. and by September, this makeshift arrangement had moved to a small rented room at Merchant Square. The Armenians collected subscriptions to build a church for themselves in 1827. By 1833, an appeal was made for land to build a church, with the sandy grounds at the foot of Fort Canning finally approved as an ideal site in 1834. The foundation stone was blessed by the Supreme Archimandrite, the Rev. Thomas Gregorian on 1 January 1835 and by 26 March 1836, it was consecrated by the priest Rev. Catchick in a three-and-a-half hour ceremony. It was dedicated to St Gregory the Illuminator, the first monk in the Armenian Church. Built at a total cost of $5,058.30 Spanish pesetas, most of the funds came from the local Armenian community.

In 1909, the Church became the first in Singapore to enjoy the benefits of electricity when it had electric lights and fans installed. During World War II, looters stripped the church of several invaluable items including a large embossed Bible, the priest's vestments and hymn and prayer books printed in the mid-19th century. The grounds were also used by the Japanese for air-raid shelters. After the Japanese occupation, few Armenians remained and services were conducted only once a year by Father Aramais Mirzaian was not based in Singapore.

Today, only during significant events are Armenian services held here including the 150th anniversary of the church held in 1986. However, the church building is still popular with other Christian groups who use it for quiet worship.


by hyacinthus

Description

The church is considered G. D. Coleman's masterpiece cleverly combining the symmetry of Palladian architecture with the practical details of Eastern architecture like louvers and wide verandahs. Its original design is considered a close resemblance to the mother church of St Gregory in Etchmiadzin, Vagarshapat in northern Armenia. Complying with tradition, the chapel faces East but this unfortunately meant that its entrance faced away from the main road. The porticoes are often regarded as one of its outstanding features, held up by Roman Doric columns and pilasters. Originally serving to shelter the gharries of the well-to-do, it was later converted for pedestrians with steps added to it. In 1847, the octagonal cone supporting a bell turret was replaced after the original dome had been deemed unsafe but the turret and steeple was again replaced in 1853 with today's pitched roof and spire, built by George Maddock. Maddock's spire is often criticised for hiding the church's true Armenian features - but its distinctive circular shape is still evident from the interior. Reflecting its original domed roof, the interior is a complete circle, 36 ft or about 11 m in diameter with a semi-circular chancel 18 ft or 5.5 m wide on the east. By the altar stands a painting of the Last Supper while draped to its side are heavy curtains that are drawn across during parts of the rites for Holy Communion. Despite its small size, the church has two vestries and two side rooms for staircases. The bell was cast by George Mears and Co. in 1861 but was likely hung only from 1883.

The original Parsonage, where the priest resided, was built in the northeast side of the gardens. However, this was demolished and a new Parsonage was built in 1905, designed by Tomlinson & Lermit, funded by Nanajan Sarkies in memory of John Shanazar Sarkies, Nanajan's husband. The Church's Memorial Garden hold the tombstones of famed Armenians including Agnes Joaquim
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Old August 13th, 2003, 09:24 AM   #3
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Cathedral of the Good Shepherd

The Cathedral of the Good Shepherd, stands at the junction of Queen Street and Bras Basah Road. It is the earliest Catholic church in Singapore and is today the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese and Archbishop. The foundation stone for the Cathedral was laid on 18 June 1843 and construction was completed by 1847.


by Cliff

Raffles gave land at Bras Basah for the Catholic Church as early as 1822. However, it was only with the arrival of Rev. Fr. J. B. Boucho in 1832 that the the first Catholic chapel was built there. The wood and attap construction was built at a cost of $700, with the money raised through public subscription. The old site at No. 3 Bras Basah Road, was later converted into a school which became St. Joseph's Institution. In February 1843, a dynamic French priest, Rev. Fr. Jean-Marie Beurel managed to convince the colonial government to provide the Catholic Mission with a plot of land diagonally opposite, at the corner of Queen Street and Bras Basah Road. The plot was to become the location for the Church of the Good Shepherd. The foundation stone was laid on 18 June 1843 by John Conolly, a merchant resident in Singapore.

Description

Denis Lesley McSwiney apparently competed with John Turnbull Thomson for the design of this new church, with McSwiney's design chosen because his had apparently been cheaper. It was built at a cost just above $18,000, in Renaissance style with the traditional cruciform plan and Roman Doric pillars. Father Beurel who had helped set up the early classes at the Convent of the Holy Infant Jesus, was also instrumental in establishing this, the earliest Catholic Church. He blessed the church on 6 June 1846.

In 1847, the distinguished water colourist, Charles Alexander Dyce, added a tower and spire which was modelled after the J. T. Thomson spire of the St Andrew's Church nearby. The Antwerp marble paving was added in 1860 and the nave extended in 1888. The Archbishop's Residence was designed by Father Charles Nain. The church was originally part of the Diocese of Malacca. In 1888, with the growing Catholic population in Singapore, the church was raised to the status of a cathedral and on 14 February 1897, the Bishop of Malacca, the Reverend Rene Fee consecrated the church after all bills were settled. The relics of St. Laurent Imbert, the first priest to visit Singapore (later martyred in Korea), are preserved in the Cathedral.
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Old August 14th, 2003, 11:00 PM   #4
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St Joseph's Church

In 1825, Father Francisco da Silva e Maia founded the Portuguese Mission on the site where St. Joseph's Church now stands. The church lays claim to being the first place of Catholic worship in Singapore. Opened in 1912 and replacing the old church building, this architectural marvel is structured in the form of a Latin cross and boasts beautifully crafted stained glass windows. St Joseph's Church was gazetted as a conservation building in 1993.

Every Good Friday, the Catholic community in Singapore commemorates the crucifixion of Christ with a procession through the grounds of this church.


by babystan03


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Old August 18th, 2003, 12:55 AM   #5
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St Theresa's Church


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Old September 23rd, 2003, 04:06 PM   #6
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Kampong Kapor Methodist Church


by RafflesCity

It all began in November 1890, in the downstairs study room of the Deaconess Home in Sophia Room. Upon request, Miss Sophia Blackmore, missionary to Singapore, started a Sunday Malay language worship service. The little group included 25 "native" girls from the mission hostel, boys from Epworth Home and Malay-speaking Christian workers from the neaby Mission Press and the 2 missionaries.

On Thursday 25 January 1894, this little group moved to "The Christian Institute" at 155 Middle Road to function as a church. At 7.30pm that evening, 6 full and 16 preparatory members were organised as the first Malay Quarterly Conference chaired by the presiding elder, Rev R W Munson. The "Malay Church" was formed with (Cpt) Rev William Shellabear undertaking pastoral charge. 3 days later, the sunday school was officially organised with about 40 students. "Sunday" school was carried out on weekdays as well. Work in the Church was clearly evangelistic.

Rev Shellabear and about a dozen young men held street and kampong meetings in Malay. Meanwhile, Miss Blackmore and her team of women as well as women missionaries made a deep impression on Baba women and children as they distributed tracts, sang hymns, visited several hundred "native" Straits-born Chinese women in their homes and held Sunday School for "native" children in their homes and along five-foot ways.

The church soon outgrew the Middle Road building. As a result a new building was constructed in Kampong Kapor Road. It was completed in 1930 and the church became known as The Straits Chinese Methodist Church (Bickley Memorial). This reflected the largely Chinese membership and the large donation which the family and friends of Bishop Bickley made for the building.

In 1957, the church was renamed Kampong Kapor Methodist Church. She celebrated her hundredth birthday in January 1994.
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Old September 23rd, 2003, 04:06 PM   #7
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Church of the Sacred Heart

[img]http://************/9zt7a0.jpg[/img]
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Old November 9th, 2003, 02:08 PM   #8
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former Convent of the Holy Infant Jesus

CHIJmes in Victoria Street began as the Convent of the Holy Infant Jesus, established in 1852, initially as an orphanage then later as a school for girls. It stands today as a commercial site, but its chapel and adjoining intricately carved buildings have been preserved.

Rev Mother St. Mathilde Raclot (b 1814 - d.1911) and 3 Sisters from the Holy Infant Jesus were encouraged by a French priest, Rev. Father V. M. Beurel to start a school for girls in Singapore in 1854 in Victoria Street. The first class of the Convent of the Holy Infant Jesus was attended by European and Eurasian girls. In 1856, Rev. Father Beurel extended the Convent when he acquired the adjoining Caldwell House, built in 1840-1841 by G. D. Coleman and now, the second oldest surviving building in Singapore. Caldwell House was used for many years as the Sister's workroom with the semicircular upstairs room used for sewing, reading and writing whilst the first storey served as a parlour for visiting guests.

The 2 storey orphanage, built around 1856, was the home of unwanted children. Father Beurel eventually acquired other lots of land between Victoria Street and North Bridge Road, to build the school for girls. Pupils included boys in the early years, most notably David Marshall.


by babystan03

Description
Father Charles Benedict Nain (b.1870 - d.1916) has been credited for designing the Gothic-inspired chapel built in 1903 with later extensions designed by Swan & MacLaren added in 1950 - 1951. The last service there was conducted on 3 November 1983 and it is now used for commercial purposes as Chijmes Hall.

Father Beurel also founded St Nicholas Girls' School which began classes in 1933 which were first conducted in 4 bungalows, part of the 1890s Hotel Van Wijk. These buildings were later incorporated into the convent grounds. St Nicholas Girls' School moved to its own premises in 1913.

Classes at Victoria Convent were conducted until November 1983 when the cluster of buildings within its walls were gazzetted and renamed CHIJmes.

There is a thread on this church and associated historical buildings here:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=227971
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Old November 9th, 2003, 02:08 PM   #9
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Orchard Road Presbyterian Church

The Orchard Road Presbyterian Church, a.k.a. Greja Kechil and the Scots Church, is the earliest Presbyterian church in Singapore. It currently runs services in multiple languages.


by RafflesCity


The East India Company contributed $250 towards a building which became the Mission Chapel. A sizeable proportion of Scots had been worshipping there, thus the Mission Chapel was nicknamed the "Scots Church". In 1822, a meeting was held amongst them with the objective of forming the first local Presbyterian congregation but it was not realised until 1856, when the Rev Thomas McKenzie Fraser arrived in Singapore.

Only on 6 May 1875 was land given upon which the current Presbyterian Church of Singapore was built. The location of the Church's foundation stone laid in 1877 is however not known. The Church was erected in 1878 at a cost of $20,000 and worship began with only 42 members. During the Japanese Occupation, it was used as a supply base for the Japanese and most of its early records were destroyed. After World War II, the Rev Geer who had been interned in Changi, reopened the Church for regular services in 1947. Today, the church holds services in various languages including English, Mandarin, Indonesian, German and Dutch.
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Old November 11th, 2003, 03:12 AM   #10
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Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary


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Old November 11th, 2003, 03:12 AM   #11
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Church of the Blessed Sacrament


by shaoye


Blessed Sacrament Church, with its huge sloping roofs that nearly touch the ground, is fondly dubbed by many as the “origami church.”Its conservaton status was announced by Mr. Mah Bow Tan, Minister for National Development, at the 2005 URA Architectural Heritage Awards Presentation Ceremony at Malay Heritage Centre on Monday, Sep 26. Other post-war buildings approved for conservation are the former Metropole Cinema (now the Fairfield Methodist Church) in Chinatown and the former Jurong Town Hall. When a building is granted conservation status it is protected as a heritage building for people to enjoy today and in the future. This status also ensures that the building is not subject to compulsory government acquisition.

Mr. Mah said that despite their simple forms, these buildings are important for their social and historical significance; they are part of the memories of the post-war generation; they document the evolution of building styles in Singapore, and are fine examples of the work of our pioneering local architects.

“Most importantly, they capture the mood and aspirations of a young Singapore nation,” he added. “Through their conservation, we hope to safeguard symbols of Singapore’s modernizing and industrializing era.”

The URA fact sheet on Blessed Sacrament Church said that its most iconic feature is the slate roof which is constructed in folds in the shape of a tent, symbolising the “tent of meeting” in the Old Testament.

The roof appears to fall to the ground to wrap the interior, with portions touching the ground and
resemble anchoring pegs, it added. These are other interesting features of Blessed Sacrament
Church highlighted by the URA:

– The main service hall is cross-shaped. The exterior brick face wall of the main altar has a Celtic cross.
– The roof has integrated slits of glass panels at the junctions where the four portions of the
cruciform shape meet, creating a dramatic play of light and shadows, which visually draws the eye upwards. This is a clever way of bringing light into the sanctuary.
– The combination of the structural fair-faced brick walls, and the timber ceiling panels create
a warm atmosphere of solidity and strength within the worship hall. The choir is located in the
balcony of the transept, designed to contribute to the ethereal qualities of the religious experience.

The church stands as a signature landmark along Queensway, forming one of the most prominent corners of the neighbourhood, the URA said. Queenstown was developed as
Singapore’s first satellite town in 1952 with shopping and high density public housing. Then-
Archbishop Michael Olcomendy asked for priests from the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts
of Jesus and Mary (Dutch Province) to prepare a parish in this locality.

In 1958, Father van Soest and Father Odo, came to Singapore to serve as priest-in-charge and
parish priest respectively.
The building was designed by Y.G. Dowsett. The parish hall was completed in October 1963 and used for worship. The church building was officially opened in 1965. As the congregation grew, a
new extension was added in 1982 and named as the Damien Centre.
This was renovated in 1992. The word “sacrament” which is used in its name means “the sign
of something sacred and hidden”. In Greek, it means “mystery”.
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Old November 20th, 2003, 12:49 AM   #12
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Church of Our Lady of Lourdes

The Church of our Lady of Lourdes, at Ophir Road, was built in 1888 by father Joachim Alexander Marie Meneuvrier. Located near Serangoon Road, this Roman Catholic church was originally meant for Indian Catholics, particularly the Tamils, but it now caters to Catholics of all races. It is named after the Church of our Lady of Lourdes, located at Lourdes, France.


by hyacinthus

A large proportion of the Indian Roman Catholics in Singapore and South Johore was made up of the Tamils. Father Joachim Alexander Marie Meneuvrier, a French priest, therefore saw the need for a church that catered to the Indian population, specifically with services in Tamil. He thus established the Roman Catholic Church of our Lady of Lourdes for this purpose in 1888. The site at which the church was built is significant, because Serangoon Road has remained an Indian enclave since the 19th century, and the location was considered convenient for the local Catholics to come to church. Subsequently, a Tamil school was founded on the church grounds catering to the education of children from the parish.

During the Japanese Occupation, two bombs fell on the church grounds, causing substantial damage to the school and the presbytery and destroying the upper floor of the parsonage. However, miraculously the church itself did not suffer the slightest damage. Japanese troops occupied the church until their surrender to the British in 1945.

In 1958, a new school called Our Lady of Lourdes English School was constructed within the church grounds. In 1974, the church authorities gave up the status of being an Indian Roman Catholic Church and chose to serve Catholics of all races and languages. The Indian influence on this charming more-than-a-century old church, however, is apparent as religious services are still conducted in Tamil and English. In 2000, two centres were set up at Marymount Convent in the church's premises to help the less fortunate upgrade or pick up a new skill. Maids of different nationalities, are trained here by self-help groups in jobs ranging from cooking to secretarial duties.


Description

The church is built in the mould of the Basilica at Lourdes, France. The neo-Gothic building with fine trimmings and grand arches underwent renovation work twice; in 1958 and in 1986. In 1958, alongside the construction of the English school building, electronic bells and French stained glass windows depicting the fifteen mysteries of the Most Holy Rosary were set up. In 1986, the building was repainted in a shade of white with the windows highlighted with two shades of blue. Two brass tablets have been set up at the church in remembrance of the services rendered to the church by two priests; Father Joachim Alexander Marie Meneuvrier and Father Louis Burghoffer. Father Meneuvrier was the first missionary to Singapore who was exclusively put in charge of the Indian Catholics here, and Father Burghoffer who succeeded Father Meneuvrier, put in 34 years of effort and valuable service for the growth of this church.


by RafflesCity
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Old November 24th, 2003, 08:25 AM   #13
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Church of St Peter and St Paul

The Church of Saints Peter and Paul was built in 1870. Located on Queen Street, the church is historically associated with the growth of the Chinese Catholic community in Singapore. Besides funding from the French Catholic community, the local Chinese Catholics also contributed to the church's establishment. The church was gazetted as a national monument in 2003.



by Cliff

To serve the religious needs of the Chinese Catholic community, a small chapel was erected at the site of the current St. Joseph's Institution in Bras Basah Road in 1830. Soon, the chapel proved too small for the growing number of worshippers. With the planned construction of the Cathedral of the Good Shepherd nearby, the Chinese congregation joined the worshippers at Cathedral. With growing needs of various linguistic goups plans were made for a new church to be built nearby for the Chinese and Indian Catholics. This new church was the Church of Saints Peter and Paul whose construction was completed in the 1860s. The church was gazetted a national monument in 2003.


Description

Built by Father Pierre Paris between 1869-1870, Emperor Napolean III was supposed to have paid for the cost of the compound wall of the church. Locally, Pedro Tan Neo Keah contributed significantly to the construction of the church and also encouraged people to donate to the cause. The original Church proved too small after some time and was enlarged twice; once between 1891and 1892 by Father F. Vignol and again between 1910 and 1911. The 1891-1892 expansion saw the erection of three marble altars, a new transept and sacristy and the 1910-1911 expansion resulted in the entrance porch and choir loft being decorated. Father Paris, who laboured to see the church flourish, is remembered for his gift of three fine bells that are still being used today. Another significant contributor to the Church was Joseph Chan Tek Yi, who built 11 houses in 1897 at his own cost to accommodate widows, catechists and the aged. This became the St. Joseph's House. Joseph Chan Tek Yi together with Low Gek Seng bore the cost of the 1910-1911 expansion work of the church.

The church is built in the tropical Gothic style, a popular architectural style amongst the other churches built during the colonial period in Singapore. One striking feature of the church is the presence of the statues of Saint Peter and Saint Paul that Father Paris placed on either side of the facade. At the time of writing this, the Church is undergoing redevelopment work and is in the middle of a fund-raising drive to raise an estimated $7 million. This work will add a new Parish building, a Columbarium and Adoration rooms to the Church.
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Old November 24th, 2003, 12:33 PM   #14
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Telok Ayer Methodist Church

Telok Ayer Church ranks as the oldest among Methodist Chinese speaking churches. Deep in the heart of the old Chinese settlement, the church was the base from which the Methodist pioneer missionary, Dr. Benjamin West, reached out to the migrated Chinese. It was in 1889 when Dr. West rented a shophouse in Upper Nanking Street (now no more in existence) to practise medicine and to work as a missionary. He started 2 services on Sunday in August that year at the shophouse, preaching to a congregation of 30 people, speaking in Malay which was translated into Hokkien.



by RafflesCity

In 1905, the shophouse structure was falling apart, but the Church found a new worship place at No. 12 Japan Street (now Boon Tat Street). In 1913, the Church bought a piece of land at the junction of Telok Ayer Street and Cecil Street. A tent was erected on the site. The Church continued to grow but the tent was soon in a dilapidated state. The Church had to move temporarily to Fairfield Methodist Girls' School at Neil Road. Meanwhile, a zinc hut measuring 6m by 10 m in floor area was constructed on the same site and in September that year, the Church resumed its worship at Telok Ayer. In 1921, more land was acquired at an adjoining site. The zinc hut was demolished and a three-storey building was built on the larger land by a French firm, Bross and Mogin. The architect was Swan & Maclaren. The building was completed and the sanctuary was dedicated on 11 January 1925. In 1935, Dr. John Sung, a well-known Chinese evangelist from China, conducted revival meetings in the Church. World War II broke out in 1941 and Singapore fell into Japanese hands on 15 February 1941. The Church was used as a refuge for about 300 people. Countless members continued to be encouraged at the weekly Sunday services which did not stop throughout those difficult and trying years.


Amazingly, after so many years, the church building has kept to the original design with little alteration to the exterior look. The basic design is western: a rectangular main body sitting on arch colonnades. But the architecture added an open pavilion on the roof at the front of the building. The roof of the pavilion is carved in the traditional Chinese manner. By this addition, the basically Roman styled building is given a Chineseness that will speak to the migrant Chinese and be identified with them. The Church sanctuary is located at the second storey level. For country churches, it is natural to have the sanctuary on the first storey, but for city churches, it is more practical to have a second storey sanctuary. At the time of building, it was common for European city churches to locate the sanctuary on the second storey. In Singapore, Telok Ayer Church could be the first church building to adopt this design.
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Old January 22nd, 2004, 07:36 PM   #15
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St George's Church

The St. George's Church, is an Anglican church built in 1911. Located at Minden Road, the church has a rich history related to the British Military presence in Singapore. It began as a garrison church in 1911 and was built to replace a 19th century church that had stood at a nearby site. It had been used as a dumping place for ammunition in the World War II. Its red brick architecture also makes it a unique building, earning it the status of a gazetted national monument in 1978. A bronze plaque was put up at the monument to mark its history in 1992. Today, the St. George's Church remains an active civilian church with a largely expatriate congregation.




The church began as a garrison church for the British troops stationed in the Tanglin Barracks which was established in 1861. The St. George's Church was constructed in 1910 and completed in October 1911. It stands on what was once a nutmeg plantation land that was owned by Colonial Treasurer William A. Willans. Before the church was built, services were held privately in the barracks. Only from 1871 was there a colonial chaplain who conducted authorised services within the barracks. Between 1870-1890, a church was built but its exact date is uncertain the Rev. H. G. Marshall served as the first St. George's chaplain when the brick building was completed.

During World War II, the Japanese used the premises as an ammunition depot and the Chaplain's Quarters became home to one of the Japanese commandants. The chaplain did not survive his incarceration as a prisoner-of-war. After the war, a rededication ceremony was held on Sunday, 10 November 1946.

St. George's Church was transferred to the Anglican Diocese of Singapore at the time the British Forces withdrew on 25 October 1971, becoming a civilian church. In 1973, it became a parish church in its own right. Bruce Winter served as its first full-time clergyman until 1978 when he was replaced by Bob Robinson. Today St. George's Church is an active civilian church with a largely expatriate congregation.


Description

St. George's Church was designed by William Henry Stanbury (b.1866 - d.1948) who was a member of the Royal Engineers and a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects. It is a fine example of classical Romanesque architecture. The style is reflected in the squat, compact shape of the church with its stone-vaulted naves and an absence of a tower or spire. It is also built for a tropical colonial setting, where the bricks remain unplastered and the walls having gaps to allow sunlight and air to filter through. The bricks themselves form the detailing on the church. These include the "egg-and-dart moulding" and the "dentil moulding". In the egg-and-dart moulding detail rows of eggs with arrow heads carved into the brick. "Dentil" means teeth in Latin, and these refer to the arches of bricks in the wall which create openings for a light breeze to flow through.

The church's original stained glass windows were packed away by the chaplain sometime before the fall of Singapore, for fear of it being destroyed by fighting forces. An intensive search after the war, failed to produce any clues to the whereabouts of the hidden windows, the chaplain having perished. Some suggest that they are buried at Changi whilst others say that they were bombed in the godown where it was being readied to be shipped to Australia. Despite an official enquiry, the location of the glass windows remain uncertain. New windows were installed and unveiled on 10 July 1955. On it are the verses "Be of good cheer, I have overcome the world."

The "Lich Gate" was built in 1942 by British 18th Division who were interned in Changi for the Changi Camp Cemetery. When the graves were moved to Kranji War Cemetery, the gate was brought to St. George's Church. With the withdrawal of British Forces from Singapore in 1971, the gate was sent to Britain and located at the Queen's Division Depot at Herfordshire. Today a Lich Gate replica stands as the original gate did in front of the church.

The church has a seating capacity for 650. The church was gazetted as a National Monument on 7 November 1978.
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Old January 22nd, 2004, 07:36 PM   #16
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Wesley Methodist Church

Methodism in Singapore began in early 1885, after the arrival of the Reverend William Fitzjones Oldham (b.1854 - d.1937) who became the first resident Methodist missionary. The first worship services were held at the Town Hall (today's Victoria Memorial Hall) and the Christian Institute (at the corner of Waterloo Street and Middle Road, the building still stands today!) until December 1885. This English Church, as it was then called, had its first chapel at Coleman Street, which was dedicated on 15 December 1886. The congregation expanded over the years, and in 1907, Singapore Government granted a 3,530 sq m site at Fort Canning for a new Church. The first worship service at this new Methodist Episcopal Church was held on Christmas Day 1908, and on 4 February 1909, it was dedicated by its Singapore founder, the Reverend Oldham, now Bishop William F. Oldham. On 7 January 1910, the church was renamed Wesley Methodist Church after John Wesley, the founder of Methodism.




Description

It is an English style Gothic building with exposed brickwork, designed by architect D. McLeod Craik. In 1910, the church was renamed Wesley Methodist Church.
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Old February 11th, 2004, 03:28 AM   #17
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Prinsep Street Presbyterian Church

The present church was constructed in 1930. Founded in 1843, it was then known as the Malay Chapel. It was the first Straits Chinese church in Singapore. The chapel was replaced with the present Romanesque style building and dedicated in 1931. The Singapore Boys’ Brigade was founded here.



The Prinsep Street Presbyterian Church was designed by architect C.J. Stephens of Swan and Maclaren. Its most notable features are the deep red bricks and raised brickwork on the tower and belfry.

At the front of the church, lightly modelled brickwork rises high in gable formation expressing the shape of the roof and culminating in a bell tower, now housing a loudspeaker. Buildings within the enclosure are all rendered and painted.
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Old February 11th, 2004, 03:28 AM   #18
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Church of The True Light

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Old December 26th, 2004, 04:24 AM   #19
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21 DEC 2004 (To add variety...)

Catholic Church of St Ignatius



International Baptist Church



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Old December 26th, 2004, 04:26 AM   #20
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I've got a picture of one that looks like a origami. Would post it.
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