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Old April 6th, 2006, 02:42 AM   #121
Lili
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Old April 13th, 2006, 05:13 AM   #122
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6 nominees sure to receive National Artist award; Palace may add more names
By Gil C. Cabacungan Jr. and Christine Avendano April 13, 2006

MALACAÑANG PALACE yesterday all but confirmed that it would be adding more names to the list of National Artist awardees this year, even as it insisted that the process of choosing the final list of recipients was not yet complete.

In a bid to explain the snafu that followed the Palace move to withdraw the announcement of the awardees only hours after making it public the other day, Executive Secretary Eduardo Ermita clarified that the conferment of the award on the six nominees, led by the late actor-director Fernando Poe Jr., would remain, denying speculations that some of the names would be taken out.

In fact, there might even be more names to be announced, which was why the announcement of the list of awardees was "premature," Ermita told reporters in Baguio City.

Cecile Guidote Alvarez, the presidential adviser on culture, also said "maybe one, two, even three names" could still be added.

Muslim sculptor

Yesterday, Presidential Chief of Staff Michael Defensor indicated who the additional awardee might be -- Muslim sculptor and painter Abdulmari Asia Imao.

Defensor said a group of Muslim cultural groups had been clamoring for Malacañang to give a Muslim artist the National Artist Award, the highest national recognition accorded Filipinos who had made significant contributions to the arts.

He said he "accidentally sat" in on a recent Palace meeting where the Muslim clamor for Imao being recognized was discussed and said this might be the reason Malacañang was "holding back" from announcing the final list of awardees.

Earlier on Tuesday, Malacañang released a list containing the names of six distinguished Filipino artists -- Bienvenido L. Lumbera (literature), Ramon A. Obusan (dance), Benedicto Cabrera (visual arts), Ildefonso P. Santos Jr., (architecture), Ramon Valera (fashion design) and Poe (film) -- who will be conferred the rank and title of Order of National Artist.

Official list withdrawn

Later that day, however, Palace executives scrambled to pull back the memo from public release, claiming that the list was not yet final and the selection process was still going on.

But Ambeth Ocampo, the chair of the joint board of commissioners of the National Commission of Culture and the Arts, told the Inquirer the other day that the selection process had been completed and the list of recommended awardees had been sent to the Palace which confirmed them.

The NCCA jointly administers the awards with the Cultural Center of the Philippines. The two institutions conduct the "committee of peers" review of the candidates and make the recommendations to the President who confirms the awardees and makes the final announcement.

According to sources in the cultural community, the awards have been attended by controversy in the past because of Malacañang's propensity to add names to the list of recommendees made by the selection process although they made clear that Presidents were legally within their rights to do this.

Palace review

Alvarez, who is also executive director of the NCCA, took the Palace line that the selection process was not yet complete. She explained that after the selection body sends its list to the President, there was still a Palace "honors committee" review before the decision was made on the final list.

She said the honors committee had yet to meet on the 2006 awardees. Aside from the President, this committee is made up of Ermita and Joaquin Lagonera, the senior executive deputy secretary. She said she might also be asked to join the committee's meetings.

Alvarez confirmed that Imao was being considered by Malacañang because letters had poured in from Muslim cultural organizations in his behalf after the original six were chosen. She said Imao was on the list of candidates considered by the selection committee but was not chosen.

"He (Imao) deserves it (the award) because he is the first Filipino Muslim to gain international fame for his art," said Alvarez, who refused to call the pressure from the Muslim organizations on Imao's behalf "lobbying."

Imao, who hails from Jolo, Sulu, draws his inspiration from the Tausug and Maranao artistic traditions of Mindanao, particularly the art of the okir wood-carving design, which he interprets in a contemporary idiom.

Proper respect

The President conferred on Imao the Presidential Medal of Merit only in June 2005.

Partisans of Poe, the opponent of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo in the 2004 election, reacted as if Malacañang was taking back the award that already belonged to Poe.

Senate Minority Leader Aquilino Pimentel Jr., claiming to have heard from his own sources that Malacañang wanted Poe stricken off the list, said it smacked of political persecution of the worst kind.

"It's a terrible thing. Now that he's dead, they're still pushing him around like a wet rag," he said.

Marichu Maceda, a close friend of Poe's widow Susan, said in an ANC television interview that Malacañang did not show proper respect for Poe when it bungled the announcement.

Alvarez clarified that the award for Poe was not being withdrawn.

"There's really no confusion. Since 2004, Poe had been nominated. But since the awards are given only every three years, we had to wait till 2006 to give it to him," she said.

Misunderstanding

Explaining how the misunderstanding could have happened, Ermita said the names of the six nominees were forwarded to the President by the National Film Academy under the supervision of the NCCA.

"Upon the approval of the President, it was handed to the Protocol [office] and given to the Office of the Press Secretary, but without knowing that there were still things that need to be done, need to be processed," he said.

He said the process was not yet final because his office had yet to prepare an executive order announcing the awardees.

"We are in the process of preparing that so until such time as we submit it to the President and she signs it, then nothing really is complete," Ermita said.

A lapse

He said "there must have been a lapse somewhere but ... the conferment [of the] awards is in June, so in a maximum of two weeks, everything will be final," he said.

"I don't think it’s anyone's fault. The Protocol and OPS just did not know that the documentation process was not yet finished," he said.

"I don't think there's anything to apologize for. These things happen," Ermita said.
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Old June 20th, 2006, 06:09 PM   #123
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hello, invite ko lang sa mga asa metro manila, lalu na makati ng saturday.

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Old July 20th, 2006, 12:11 AM   #124
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Restoring the Spoliarium

Restoring the Spoliarium

Penman (Butch Dalisay) for Monday, July 17, 2006



CREATING A masterpiece is hard enough, but sometimes restoring or preserving one can be just as tough if not more difficult.

That rare breed of specialists we know as art restorers or conservators certainly know this. It took Michelangelo four years to paint the frescoes on the Sistine Chapel ceiling—now one of the hallmarks of Western civilization—but it took an international team of experts 12 years to restore the work to its nearly-original glory, paring away centuries of grime and soot. And the end of the restoration proved to be only the beginning of a continuing debate over whether it was right, in the first place, to mess with the dark, brooding magnificence of the aged frescoes. (For a quick look at the work in question—before, after, and during the restoration—check out this website.)

Here in the Philippines, we’ve been blessed by the proliferation of gifted and productive artists who’ve left us with a trove of valuable and irreplaceable art—valuable not only in the financial sense but more so in terms of their significance to our cultural and even political history. It’s a far cry from where we are now, but in the days of Jose Rizal (himself an artist of no mean talent), painters and poets were important people, their greatest works held with the same esteem we now reserve for Manny Pacquiao.

One such artist, of course—if not the greatest of them—was Juan Luna y Novicio (1857-1899), a young man whose obvious gift for painting took him to Europe in the 1880s as a government pensionado. In Rome, in March 1884 and after eight months of labor, Luna completed what would become his signature work: the Spoliarium, a massive (almost eight by five meters) oil on canvas painting depicting two dead gladiators being dragged to an ignominious disposal as men and women look on in helpless horror. The word spoliarium itself refers to that part of the Roman Colosseum complex where the corpses of vanquished gladiators were divested of their armor and weapons, for reuse by the survivors.

In May 1884, the painting was exhibited at the Nacional Exposicion de Bellas Artes in Madrid, and won the first of three gold medals, besting compatriot Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo, whose Virgenes Cristianas Expuestas al Populacho won a silver medal. The victory sealed Luna’s reputation as a painter of the highest order, and praise—as well as Filipino pride—abounded.

Almost immediately, Filipinos on the verge of a revolution saw the work as an allegory for colonial suffering. Critic Eric Torres reports that “Rizal interpreted the Spoliarium as a symbol of ‘our social, moral, and political life: humanity unredeemed, reason and aspiration in open fight with prejudice, fanaticism, and injustice.’ On another occasion, Lopez-Jaena likewise read political implications in the Spoliarium, as follows: ‘For me, if there is something grand, something sublime, in the Spoliarium, it is because behind the canvas, behind the painted figures… there floats the living image of the Filipino people sighing its misfortune. Because… the Philippines is nothing more than a real Spoliarium with all its horrors.’”

For Luna, it meant a welcome stream of commissions, and entry into some of Europe’s most exclusive circles. His life would take a tragic turn when, in 1892, he shot his wife and mother-in-law to death in a fit of jealous rage (just as outrageously, he was slapped on the wrist and released by a French court that saw the deed as a forgivable “crime of passion”). He died in Hong Kong in 1899 from a severe heart attack (some say he was poisoned), broken by the news of his brother Antonio’s murder back home.

Today we remember Juan Luna not just for the Spoliarium, but also other masterworks such as the Blood Compact (and one of my favorites, the enigmatic green-gowned woman of Despues del Baile). The more practical minded might note, with some cynicism, that Luna’s Parisian Life took a P43-million chunk out of GSIS pensionsers’ funds. But it remains the Spoliarium that we identify most with Luna, and, indeed, with the romantic notion of a Golden Age of Filipino painting, when we proved ourselves equal to the world’s best.

The Spoliarium itself would acquire an interesting if spotted history. After having been exhibited in Rome, Madrid, and Paris, it was bought (while still in Paris) by the provincial government of Barcelona in 1885 for 20,000 pesetas. In 1887, it was moved to the Museo del Arte Moderno in Barcelona, where it remained in storage until the museum was burned and looted in 1937, during the Spanish Civil War. Damaged, the painting was sent by Gen. Franco to Madrid for restoration, and remained there for 18 years. In the 1950s, patriotic Filipinos and sympathetic Spaniards moved for its repatriation to Manila. (“Repatriation” is misleading, since it had never been here before.) Franco heard of these plans and ordered the work restored and donated to the Philippines; restorers worked on it in late 1957, and the painting was turned over to our Ambassador Nieto in January 1958.

And then a curious thing happened. Just before it was shipped to Manila, the Spoliarium was cut into three pieces, with each piece going into its own crate. These pieces were much later received by the Juan Luna Centennial Manila Commission in 1960; Antonio Dumlao performed relining and cleaning, while Carlos da Silva took charge of the mounting, framing, and architectural work. In December 1962, the restored Spoliarium was unveiled in the Hall of Flags of the Department of Foreign Affairs. (And this was where I first saw it, on a high-school field trip.)

It was hardly the best spot for the masterpiece, because, as a reporter would later observe, “Molds caused by the moisture from an air-conditioning unit have eaten away the paint in the lower right hand corner of the huge canvas, and a sizeable area immediately above. The painting's signature today has the appearance of a grayish patch from which the paint has been clumsily scraped away. Furthermore, the inexpert joining of the canvas has begun to show. The new coat of varnish applied to the seam fails to match the old coat so that a broad swath appears to separate a third of the painting from the rest.”

In 1982, the painting was cleaned by the late Suzanno “Jun” Gonzalez, and at some point, the Spoliarium was moved to its present location in the National Museum.

And here begins the vignette of its latest restoration, undertaken by a young but experienced and energetic company called the Art Restoration and Conservations Specialists, Inc. (ACES). Headed by painter June Poticar Dalisay (uhmm, yes, we’re related—and that’s how I got this story), the Spanish-trained members of ACES have worked on a score of important restoration projects since their formal incorporation in 2001, including the ceiling paintings of the 150-year-old St. John the Baptist Church in Jimenez, Misamis Oriental, and a steady stream of works by Botong Francisco, Vicente Manansala, Jose Joya, Anita Magsaysay-Ho, and J. Elizalde Navarro, among other Filipino masters.

No, Beng (that’s what I call June) and her team didn’t restore the whole painting—that will need vastly more time and resources—but they were brought in to address a relatively small but potentially critical problem that had developed. Sometime last year, the Spoliarium had to be moved in its entirety by three-and-a-half meters to make room for another painting, but even the best care—which we’d have to assume was taken—couldn’t prevent cracks from forming in the joints and on the canvas itself.

ACES prides itself on its scientific approach and its respect for the artwork and its creator—it won’t take on a job if all the owner wants is a coat of varnish and some dabs of pigment to make a painting “look new”—and it responds to every assignment as a team, usually comprising a painter, an art historian or scholar, a chemist, and an architect. The Spoliarium was their most challenging task to date because of its historical importance, but the job itself was easily broken down into predictable and manageable phases, from detailed photo documentation (before and after), grid-laying, data recording, and a thorough discussion of the problems and options, to the actual repair, which consisted of mechanical cleaning, testing the solubility of the damaged paint layer, consolidation, removal of the facing and excess glue, and retouching.

Working almost daily on wiry scaffoldings that brought them nose-to-nose with the painting, the ACES team finished the job in four months, and is now completing its report (from where much of the data here was taken). But even more interesting to me, as a distant kibitzer (I never even got past the door, so strict were the conditions), were Beng & Co.’s personal observations:

“My team of scientific conservators and I were in awe the first time we set foot inside the Great Hall of the Masters. We stood inches away from the painting, a magnificent work of art that takes one's breath away. Its size stupefied us while the drama and energy that emanate from the powerful images on canvas affected us profoundly and transported us to Luna's studio in Rome….

“Many questions came up as we studied the physical condition of the painting through our magnifying glass. We knew very little about it and we needed to know its story so we could better understand its present condition. How did it find its way to Madrid? Who took care of the painting? How and where was it hung or kept? What were the circumstances surrounding its journey to the Philippines? Was it restored before it was returned to the Philippine government? Who restored the painting? Who and how was it mounted and put up in its present site?

“Gathering information and data on the Spoliarium proved difficult. The National Museum tried its best to help but could not furnish us with any kind of documentation. Some individuals had stories to tell about the painting, but we needed hard data. Finally, Ricky Francisco, who was a member of the conservation team, found a report on the Spoliarium, while Roberto Balarbar, a conservator with the Chemical and Conservation Laboratory of the National Museum, also found a copy of a research paper among his files. These data proved very valuable and helpful for they answered many of our questions and filled in many gaps in the history of the painting.

“However, some questions remain unanswered at this point. One issue that continues to puzzle us is Madrid's decision to cut the painting into three parts. Did Madrid inform the Philippine government about this decision? Who decided this? Is there a document to prove that the Philippine government gave Madrid permission to do so? Did the size of Spoliarium make loading it into a ship truly impossible? Was there not any ship capable or willing to accommodate a painting of such length? What kind of ship was it loaded on? Did anyone from the Philippine government accompany the Spoliarium as it traveled from Madrid to Manila?

“We hope that in the future, an art historian will come along and accept the challenge to dig deeper into the history of the Spoliarium and uncover other stories that surrounded the painting while it was in Rome and Madrid.”

And let me add that if you or anyone you know has any of the answers to these questions—or corrections to make to the painting’s history as ACES knows it—do let me know and I’ll pass it on to them.

Much more work needs to be done on the rest of the Spoliarium, and credit has to be given to National Museum Director Cora Alvina for her tireless campaign to seek support not just for the Spoliarium but the many other priceless pieces of our heritage in her safekeeping.

Not incidentally, Beng and I recently attended a benefit concert at the National Museum sponsored by the Museum Foundation of the Philippines, featuring the opera “Spoliarium,” with music by Ryan Cayabyab and libretto by Fides Cuyugan-Asencio. It was a marvelous musical treat, worthy of its subject, and proof positive that, as in Juan Luna’s time, we have what it takes to compete with the world’s best. Ryan’s score convinced me that I had heard the work of a future National Artist—of a much gentler bent than Luna, but certainly no less talented. Mabuhay ang Pilipino!
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Last edited by sugarboy; July 20th, 2006 at 12:16 AM.
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Old July 20th, 2006, 01:48 AM   #125
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Thanks for reviving this thread @Sugarboy with no less than an interesting piece by Butch Dalisay on Juan Luna's The Spolarium.

It is heartening to know that careful work and restoration are being done by young but experienced and energetic company called the Art Restoration and Conservations Specialists, Inc. (ACES) on this work of major historical significance in Philippine arts, particularly that this group prides itself on its scientific approach and its respect for the artwork and its creator.

There are many interesting questions posited in that article and I do hope that the history of the Spolarium will be further revealed by our researchers and art historians: particularly that it had to be cut in 3 parts to ship it back to Manila and that Generalissimo Franco actually agreed to give it back to the Philippines.

Imbedded in that article are mentions of other Philippine artists including the writer himself Jose "Butch" Dalisay, composer Ryan Cayabyab and coloratura Fides Cuyugan Asencio.

Last edited by Lili; July 20th, 2006 at 01:55 AM.
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Old July 20th, 2006, 01:53 AM   #126
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you're welcome @lili. actually, i was googling for some items on butch dalisay to post on the science high thread. then i stumbled on this.
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Old August 6th, 2006, 05:53 AM   #127
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Philippine National Heroes

Jose the Rizal - Jack the Ripper?

http://news.inq7.net/opinion/index.p...d=66981&col=80
By Ambeth Ocampo
Inquirer

URBAN legends in Philippine history fascinate me. While some people search for the "White Lady" of Balete Drive or Robina Gokongwei's "snake twin" lurking in department store dressing rooms, I try to find the elusive "kapre" that lives in an ancient mango tree near the Emilio Aguinaldo house in Kawit town or Andres Bonifacio's love child from a place aptly named Libog (now Santo Domingo) in Albay province. It was thus stupid of me to presume that the most incredible Jose Rizal urban legend was that he was the father of Adolf Hitler, the result of an indiscretion with a prostitute in Vienna. The most current urban legend is that Rizal was Jack the Ripper!

Textbook history tells us that Rizal was in London from May 1888 to January 1889, in the British Library copying "Sucesos de las islas Filipinas" by hand because there were no photocopying machines at the time. Jack the Ripper was active around this time, and since we do now know what Rizal did at night or on the days he was not in the library, some people would like to believe Rizal is suspect. They argue that when Rizal left London, the Ripper murders stopped. They say that Jack the Ripper must have had some medical training, based on the way his victims were mutilated. Rizal, of course, was a doctor. Jack the Ripper liked women, and so did our own Rizal. And -- this is so obvious that many overlooked it -- Jose Rizal's initials match those of Jack the Ripper!

For someone who wrote a great deal on the most ordinary things, Rizal only made passing reference to Jack the Ripper in an essay on the Guardia Civil he wrote in the April 30, 1890 issue of La Solidaridad. Can this be added to the flimsy but growing list of circumstantial evidence to make Rizal a suspect?

If you open the Jack the Ripper website, you will find Rizal's name on the long list of suspects. There is even a forum dedicated to Rizal, (*http://forum.casebook.org/showthread.php?t=199*) begun by a certain "Amateursleuth" who signs in allegedly from Canada and signs the postings "Karen." Her first posting lists the following data:

"In 1888, he was staying with the Beckett family at 37 Chalcot Crescent in Camden [London]; He was a doctor (ophthalmologist); He was good with weapons (was called 'the swordsman'); He was a Malay; He was proficient in the martial arts; He would have been 27 at the time of the Ripper killings; He was short, had dark skin, dark hair, and dark eyes; He came from a well to do family, was well dressed and looked respectable; He came to London on May 24, 1888 on the ship City of Rome; He left London in January of 1889, and the Ripper killings stopped; He was multi-talented (could speak many languages, was a writer, poet, author, sculptor, artist); He was executed in the Philippines on December 30, 1896 at the age of 35; Had a romantic relationship with Gertrude Beckett-the daughter of Charles Beckett; He wrote letters to his friend Blumentritt from London, however there were no letters written to his family or friends from July 1888-Nov. 14, 1888; After he died, his mother tried to procure his assets which consisted of some pretty nice jewelry, including gold cuff links and other baubles of diamonds and amethysts (gold chain with a red stone seal?); I think this man warrants further investigation, which I intend to do."

She provided a photo of Rizal from an Argentine website leading a certain Glenn Andersson, writer and historian, to remark:

"An interesting character; good luck with the research and come back with more when you can. With such South American features, I doubt that he fits in well with the possible sightings, but then on the other hand, we can't be sure that any of those witnesses saw the Ripper anyway. After all, foreign suspects from those parts were under investigation by the police at the time."

Then somebody remarked that Rizal was in Paris at the time one of the victims, Annie Chapman, was cut up leading "Karen" to reply:

"OK, maybe he didn't kill Annie Chapman, but he had a friend called Dr. Antonio Regidor who could have killed her. Rizal stayed with him in London prior to moving in with the Becketts. Dr. Regidor was also from Manila. They were quite close."

It was also noted that one of the Ripper victims was buried in the same cemetery where Regidor and his family presently lie in peace. Karen later added:

"Since Dr. Rizal was in Paris between Sept. 4 and Sept. 10, 1888, it is therefore impossible for him to have killed Annie Chapman. However, after some digging, I discovered that Rizal had a good friend named Dr. Reinhold Rost who lived approximately 1 block from the Becketts' at 1 Elsworthy Terrace, Camden."

The most incredible piece of information-and absolutely untrustworthy-is that some time in January 1986, the present owners of the London apartment Rizal stayed in discovered a trunk in their attic that contained a diary where Rizal confesses to the Whitechapel murders and a glass jar with half a human kidney preserved in alcohol!

All these tales are ridiculous, but in life and death Rizal continues to fascinate, and tales continue to be spun around him, keeping him current and interesting a century after his execution.
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:09 AM   #128
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That is a funny link about Jose Rizal being a suspected Jack the Ripper. And AmateurSleuth is even dead serious about his/her investigation. He/She listed the following findings:

"20th January 2006, 04:21 PM
AmateurSleuth Posts: n/a

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have been doing some research on Dr. Jose Rizal. This is what I have found out so far:

- In 1888, he was staying with the Beckett family at 37 Chalcot Crescent in Camden
- He was a doctor(opthalmologist)
- He was good with weapons(was called "the swordsman")
- He was a Malay
- He was proficient in the martial arts
- He would have been 27 at the time of the Ripper killings
- He also took up fencing and was quite good
- He was short, had dark skin, dark hair, and dark eyes
- He came from a well to do family, was well dressed and looked respectable
- He came to London on May 24, 1888 on the ship City Of Rome
- He left London in January of 1889, and the Ripper killings stopped
- He was multi-talented(could speak many languages, was a writer, poet, author, sculptor, artist)
- He was executed in the Philippines on December 30, 1896 at the age of 35
- Had a romantic relationship with Gertrude Beckett - the daughter of Charles Beckett
- He wrote letters to his friend Blumentritt from London, however there were no letters written to his family or friends from July 1888 - November 14, 1888
- He was working at the British Library at the time
- After he died, his mother tried to procure his assets which consisted of some pretty nice jewelery including gold cuff links and other baubles of diamonds and amethysts(gold chain with a red stone seal?)
I think this man warrants further investigation, which I intend to do

Here is a photo of Dr. Jose Rizal:

http://www.buenosairespe.com.ar/images/rizal.jpg"

Last edited by Lili; August 6th, 2006 at 06:19 AM.
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:18 AM   #129
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yah... she was really serious about it lol
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:26 AM   #130
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hey wasnt Jose Rizal also suspected as Hitlers Father?
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:28 AM   #131
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^ Yup! lol. What is the next urban legend?

He came from the Merovingian line?
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:40 AM   #132
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nyahaha, kung anu-ano na lang..
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:43 AM   #133
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just sharing the knowledge... i think new threads is enough for the day hehe
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Old August 6th, 2006, 06:44 AM   #134
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but further discussion about this subject is welcome
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Old August 6th, 2006, 07:43 AM   #135
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oops, baka you got me wrong Isaric..hehe, i meant kung anu ano na lang na urban legend ang nagiging product ng fertile imagination ng tao..hehe.
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Old August 6th, 2006, 07:55 AM   #136
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LOL Jose The Rizal...
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Old August 6th, 2006, 07:58 AM   #137
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The killings stopped when he left?! Uh oh...
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Old August 6th, 2006, 11:53 AM   #138
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pinoys could be a schizophrenic lot at times. take the case of our dear kiretoce, punching his friend for no apparent reason (see other thread on Unforgettable Events in High School/College) . so what makes us think JR wasn't capable of such? maybe he was really out to collect female eyeball samples to examine and study meticulously before he finally operated on his mom

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lili
That is a funny link about Jose Rizal being a suspected Jack the Ripper. And AmateurSleuth is even dead serious about his/her investigation. He/She listed the following findings:

"20th January 2006, 04:21 PM
AmateurSleuth Posts: n/a

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have been doing some research on Dr. Jose Rizal. This is what I have found out so far:

- In 1888, he was staying with the Beckett family at 37 Chalcot Crescent in Camden
- He was a doctor(opthalmologist)
- He was good with weapons(was called "the swordsman")
- He was a Malay
- He was proficient in the martial arts
- He would have been 27 at the time of the Ripper killings
- He also took up fencing and was quite good
- He was short, had dark skin, dark hair, and dark eyes
- He came from a well to do family, was well dressed and looked respectable
- He came to London on May 24, 1888 on the ship City Of Rome
- He left London in January of 1889, and the Ripper killings stopped
- He was multi-talented(could speak many languages, was a writer, poet, author, sculptor, artist)
- He was executed in the Philippines on December 30, 1896 at the age of 35
- Had a romantic relationship with Gertrude Beckett - the daughter of Charles Beckett
- He wrote letters to his friend Blumentritt from London, however there were no letters written to his family or friends from July 1888 - November 14, 1888
- He was working at the British Library at the time
- After he died, his mother tried to procure his assets which consisted of some pretty nice jewelery including gold cuff links and other baubles of diamonds and amethysts(gold chain with a red stone seal?)
I think this man warrants further investigation, which I intend to do

Here is a photo of Dr. Jose Rizal:

http://www.buenosairespe.com.ar/images/rizal.jpg"
next urban myth, JR was a transvestite
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Old August 6th, 2006, 12:01 PM   #139
amigo32
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Si Jose Rizal daw ay dios nagkatawang tao. tama ba ako Mr. Ecleo?
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Old August 6th, 2006, 04:09 PM   #140
Lili
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarboy
pinoys could be a schizophrenic lot at times. take the case of our dear kiretoce, punching his friend for no apparent reason (see other thread on Unforgettable Events in High School/College) . so what makes us think JR wasn't capable of such? maybe he was really out to collect female eyeball samples to examine and study meticulously before he finally operated on his mom
But decided instead to collect female uteruses. Did he know he was "baog"?
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