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Old August 31st, 2009, 01:41 PM   #1461
NCT
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The thing is there's no lane discipline in China - people don't drive on the right and overtake on the left - more often than not you've got a slow lorry crawling on the outside lane and faster vehicles have to overtake and undertake like mad. Therefore efficiency on Chinese motorways is low. Then you have official speed limits that are unrealistic, unsystematic and archaic.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 02:29 PM   #1462
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You find that kind of drivers everywhere around the world.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 10:15 PM   #1463
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Quote:
Originally Posted by z0rg View Post
You find that kind of drivers everywhere around the world.
On British Roads you feel as though all the cars are stationary and the road is moving underneath - everyone drives at almost exactly the same speed. Of course you've still got the odd idiot on the road.

On British motorways it's strictly overtaking on the outside lane. On 3-lane motorways if you were on the inside lane and there's someone crawling in the second lane, you would overtake it on the outside lane.

Last edited by NCT; September 2nd, 2009 at 05:51 PM. Reason: code syntax
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 03:57 AM   #1464
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No lane discipline, true, but the impatient drivers weave between the lanes to drive fast...
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 05:26 AM   #1465
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How high are fines in China for traffic offences ?
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 05:58 AM   #1466
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Quote:
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The motorway network in China is expanding at a very impressive speed. I do question though whether such an extensive network is actually necessary. In the remote areas normal roads are underused, all that's needed is to separate pedestrian and cycles from the main carriageway, a few pedestrain bridges, tunnels or crossings, roundabouts or junctions for crossroads, and a by-pass around towns where necessary. Building a whole new road just because of a few hot-spots seem rather unwise.
The same was true about the US before they built the Interstates, and Germany before they built the Autobahn. In time it will become unacceptable to not have a network of expressways.
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 01:56 PM   #1467
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China needs to invest so much in large scale infrastructure simply because they need to provide jobs for the 20m+ young workers than join the job market every year.

Without such huge funds being pumped into the economy, the unemployment rate would skyrocket and Beijing would have a country full of riots on its hands.

That's why China needs roughly 8% economic growth a year, that's the bare minimum needed to provide new jobs for the population.
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Old September 4th, 2009, 08:05 PM   #1468
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Quote:
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The same was true about the US before they built the Interstates, and Germany before they built the Autobahn. In time it will become unacceptable to not have a network of expressways.
I'm not completely convinced by your reasoning.

What I described applies to many truly rural areas where major towns and cities are very far apart - you are essentically talking about an overall density similar to Wales (Yunnan 112 ppl/sqkm, Wales 140 ppl/sqkm), and these areas, usually mountainous, are neither likely or suitable to have significant population rises. In these places it seems to make no sense at all to have 2 (sometimes huge) roads running parallel.

As China is still in the process of developing, it's much easier now to encourage people to use public transport, so it'll never be in the sorry position America is now in, where car-dependency is unsustainably high, ugly roads ruthlessly cut across the countryside and people's minds are set like stone.
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Old September 4th, 2009, 10:29 PM   #1469
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usually they connect two huge cities far apart, such as Kunming and Chengdu, and Wulumuqi and Lanzhou, so there might not be much population between the cities, but that doesn't mean they are useless entirely; I still think there will be significant intercity traffic.
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Old September 13th, 2009, 07:29 AM   #1470
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9.12 Beijing 6th Ring opens

The last section of Beijing 6th Ring road, West 6th Ring is completed and opened on Sep 12 2009.

Total length: 187.6km
Cost: 19 billion yuan
Speed limit 80-100kmph







[IMG]http://i27.************/bh0dxc.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i26.************/im546h.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i26.************/eqvuvd.jpg[/IMG]
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 06:19 AM   #1471
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desert highway in Xinjiang








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Old October 2nd, 2009, 09:26 AM   #1472
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Quote:
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This is interesting. Is it to prevent road being covered with sand?
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Old October 3rd, 2009, 01:39 AM   #1473
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yes, and also to prevent excess desertification.
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Old October 4th, 2009, 02:54 AM   #1474
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Quote:
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desert highway in Xinjiang




How are these "sand stoppers" made and for how long do they stretch?
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Old October 4th, 2009, 11:31 AM   #1475
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These remind me of the rows of piceas we have next to many of our highways. They were planted during Soviet times to prevent blowing snow on the road.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 08:31 AM   #1476
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Quote:
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How are these "sand stoppers" made and for how long do they stretch?
There are different methods. The one there is a woven straw matrix that helps hold down sand and plantings. They can stretch pretty huge distances hundreds of miles. I think the idea for these is that they'll last long enough for the plants to take hold after which the root systems will hold the soil together.
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Old October 12th, 2009, 10:15 AM   #1477
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http://www.shanghaidaily.com/sp/arti...cle_416026.htm
Quote:
City roads renamed in national unity drive

By Dong Zhen | 2009-10-12 | NEWSPAPER EDITION

ALL Shanghai expressways will receive new names and numerical codes over the next five months as part of a nationwide initiative to create a unified naming system for highways.
The city had already started to replace its highway signs and this process would continue until next March, the Shanghai Highway Administration said yesterday.
Drivers may find the new highway codes confusing in the early stages, and officials have taken measures to head off this problem.
Authorities are printing 2 million free illustrated pamphlets, which will be distributed at major toll stations and transport hubs to inform drivers of the changes.
Traffic police have begun setting up temporary signs designed to help drivers understand the changes.
These signs may stay at key highway spots for months or even longer, police said yesterday.
Two around-the-clock hotlines, 5911-5999 and 12122, have been set up to handle driver queries.
Information on the changes is also available on the local construction commission's Chinese Website, www.shjjw.gov.cn or the highway administration's Chinese Website, www.highway.sh.cn.
In Shanghai, eight national expressways and nine provincial-level routes will have new names and codes under the unified standard.
For example, the A11 or Shanghai-Nanjing Expressway, has a new code, G2, as it is part of the Beijing-Shanghai Expressway.
The new standards require all national-level expressways to start with "G."
The changes in road names are necessary as new regulations require that any national route should only be identified by a combination of the names of the cities at the starting and finishing points.
The new system will eventually make things clearer for drivers as fragmented regional names now point to the same expressways that run through different cities and provinces, highway officials said yesterday.
Provincial-level expressways in Shanghai, as well as other parts of China, will have codes starting with "S" as well as improved names in line with the new national standards.
Traffic signs on the city section of the G2 will all be replaced by the end of this month.
The whole campaign would involve building thousands of new signs in the city at a cost of nearly 200 million yuan (US$29.30 million), traffic police said yesterday.
The new nationwide system has red as the logo color for national routes and yellow for provincial expressways.
Highway officials stressed that complete signs carrying both the road names and codes would only appear near toll gates or major entry-exit ramps. Code signs would be scattered along the routes themselves.
"It's crucial that drivers check up on the routes before heading out," Wang Weiheng, a highway administration official, said yesterday. Wang said there would not be as many signs under the new system.
The new naming and coding rules are in three categories - for routes starting from Beijing and for west-east and north-south routes.

Read more: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/sp/arti...#ixzz0Thg7h1yL
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Old October 12th, 2009, 07:34 PM   #1478
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finally!
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Old October 12th, 2009, 07:48 PM   #1479
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Agreed! These things are what plague developing countries a lot in my opinion-- lack of proper standardization and so on. It is essential for China to be developing it at this stage.
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Old October 13th, 2009, 12:54 AM   #1480
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There definitely needs a comprehensive and systematic road numbering system in China. Predictably a lot of Chinese people are dead against this change.
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