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Old October 30th, 2011, 12:39 AM   #1821
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
If there weren't any bad roads, corrupt police officers or border controls, you could drive to China in about 9 - 10 days from Europe. Doesn't sound that far actually. It would be epic to do that some day.
Govt. in general sadly Chris. Otherwise, yeah, I think it would be a hoot to cruise some of those highways.

That said, Some of these routes, especially the last pics are pretty damn impressive. Pic #3 in Derekf1974's post looks a lot like the Park Bridge in Yoho Natl. Park, here in Canada.

I'm curious as to why these motorways are being built in such remote areas. The population levels don't seem to warrant them there. Connections to bordering countries? I can kinda see that, but still...

What is the driving standard, compared to other countries? Is it as chaotic as India, where most driving "rules" are either made up as you go along, or is it better than that.
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Old October 30th, 2011, 01:12 AM   #1822
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Quote:
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I'm curious as to why these motorways are being built in such remote areas. The population levels don't seem to warrant them there. Connections to bordering countries? I can kinda see that, but still...
I've got a feeling that strengthening central government control in remote areas is an important rationale. Western China is frontier country and making it accessible quickly also means that they can be controlled. And that it is slowly but surely converted to Han standards (large groups of Han have already been moved to the area).
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Old October 30th, 2011, 02:19 AM   #1823
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Pino- View Post
I've got a feeling that strengthening central government control in remote areas is an important rationale. Western China is frontier country and making it accessible quickly also means that they can be controlled. And that it is slowly but surely converted to Han standards (large groups of Han have already been moved to the area).
It well depends on how you look at it. Living standards in China are rising and so are costs of manufacturing and other economic activities. Coastal regions (including such manufacturing powerhouses like Shenzhen) are under fast de-industrialization process. Some of those industries will probably move inland where costs are much cheaper. For that they will need good transport links to transport goods cheaply and efficiently. That perhaps sounds like a more logical reason rather than just being able to control it.
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Old October 30th, 2011, 10:15 PM   #1824
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I've just found pics of an expressway that doesn't appear on Google Maps yet! It's the G45 in Hebei, from Beijing border to just South of Bazhou.
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Old October 30th, 2011, 10:56 PM   #1825
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That's the Daguang Expressway. It will form a continuous link from Daqing to Guangzhou, but not all sections are completed yet (most notably in northern China).
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Old October 30th, 2011, 11:04 PM   #1826
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That's freakin' 3500km! Totally badass.
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Old October 30th, 2011, 11:19 PM   #1827
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There are a number of 3000+ km north-south links in eastern China. Most of them have numbers like G015, G025, G035, G045, G055, G065, etcetera. Much like the American Interstate numbering, or the Korean Expressway numbering, increases of 10 indicate long-distance routes, except for G001 - G009 which are radial roads from Beijing.
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Old October 31st, 2011, 06:29 PM   #1828
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I believe they are numbered without the trailing zeroes, so it's only G3, G65, etc. Of course, there are exceptions: the Changsha ringroad is G0401, and the Hohhot one is G0601.

The beltway numbering is confusing me: They always end in 01, so there will be up to 8 G1501s! And two of them in Fujian province!
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Old October 31st, 2011, 06:37 PM   #1829
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNGL View Post
I believe they are numbered without the trailing zeroes, so it's only G3, G65, etc. Of course, there are exceptions: the Changsha ringroad is G0401, and the Hohhot one is G0601.

The beltway numbering is confusing me: They always end in 01, so there will be up to 8 G1501s! And two of them in Fujian province!
Well, the USA has multiple duplicate three-digit interstate route numbers (beltlines/ringroads and spurs) and they don't seem to be confusing. There are no duplications of those numbers within states, though.

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Old November 1st, 2011, 03:30 AM   #1830
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Traditionally U.S. Interstate numbering was as follows:

5-95 (W-E, increasing in increments of 5): N-S highways
10-90 (S-N, likewise increasing): E-W highways

The following prefixes would be appended to the ruling road(s) of a given metro, normally in the same travel direction. I-95 thus gets plenty.

100s-400s prefixes: spur roads
600s prefix: beltways (ringroads and bypasses in EuroSpeak)
800s prefix: alternative routings (rare).

Even numbers are always E-W and odd N-S*. Interstates which don't conform to the base-5 grid do not go cross-country. Sometimes two distinct instances of the same bi-numbered Interstate occur, e.g. I-76 (turnpike routing from Philadelphia to Ohio + Rockies routing somewhere out in Colorado), but these are rare.
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*With very occasional exceptions. I-476 in PA is a N-S routing from Philadelphia to Scranton.
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Old November 1st, 2011, 09:24 AM   #1831
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
Traditionally U.S. Interstate numbering was as follows:

5-95 (W-E, increasing in increments of 5): N-S highways
10-90 (S-N, likewise increasing): E-W highways

The following prefixes would be appended to the ruling road(s) of a given metro, normally in the same travel direction. I-95 thus gets plenty.

100s-400s prefixes: spur roads
600s prefix: beltways (ringroads and bypasses in EuroSpeak)
800s prefix: alternative routings (rare).

Even numbers are always E-W and odd N-S*. Interstates which don't conform to the base-5 grid do not go cross-country. Sometimes two distinct instances of the same bi-numbered Interstate occur, e.g. I-76 (turnpike routing from Philadelphia to Ohio + Rockies routing somewhere out in Colorado), but these are rare.
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*With very occasional exceptions. I-476 in PA is a N-S routing from Philadelphia to Scranton.

Actually, odd first digits in three-digit interstate route numbers are for spurs and even first digits are for beltlines and alternate routes.

Mike
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Old November 7th, 2011, 07:06 PM   #1832
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgk920 View Post
Well, the USA has multiple duplicate three-digit interstate route numbers (beltlines/ringroads and spurs) and they don't seem to be confusing. There are no duplications of those numbers within states, though.

Mike
Well, the US is other thing. And why you always sign your posts? I know your name, it's Mike. But you don't know mine.

I cross-post from Chinese forum. This is part of G5 Beijing-Kunming expressway:
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Originally Posted by _Jan_ View Post
The new Guangyuan(广元)- Shaanxi (陕西)highway was opened in May, 2011. It is one of the most important expressways of Sichuan to the northern part of China.

I don't know how to upload pictures here, so I only put the links.







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Old November 8th, 2011, 01:37 AM   #1833
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Looks amaing. I wonder though why didn't they straighten it up a little bit? Of course that would have been some additional work but roads like that are typically meant to be as straight as possible. Is it to save money or to preserve the natural landscape?
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Old November 8th, 2011, 04:14 AM   #1834
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pansori View Post
Looks amaing. I wonder though why didn't they straighten it up a little bit? Of course that would have been some additional work but roads like that are typically meant to be as straight as possible. Is it to save money or to preserve the natural landscape?
One reason may be that a curvy road blends in better with the landscape.
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Old November 8th, 2011, 08:12 AM   #1835
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If only I have a BMW and live nearby.
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Old November 8th, 2011, 10:47 AM   #1836
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Originally Posted by Pansori View Post
I wonder though why didn't they straighten it up a little bit?
1. Pillars are better not to be in the riverbed
2. It is cheaper as such than having numerous tunnels and/or bridges over river
3. I believe there is probably a demanding geology of the surrounding hills, making slope tunnels very expensive.
3. And last, expressway is actually pretty straight:
http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=sl&ll...h&z=15&vpsrc=6
(from March '10; follow dots of the pillars)
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Old November 8th, 2011, 11:40 AM   #1837
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some motorway turns are also needed because of height difference, because the road can't be too steep.
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Old November 8th, 2011, 03:22 PM   #1838
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True, but obliviously not in this case, if you look at alignment.

Interesting note is that according to very short Wikipedia article surrounding district of Lizhou city (subcity?) Guangyuan has 460,000 people and only one junction to this new motorway (and not very big). Also interesting to note is that it looks like parallel two-laned road is access controled with toll stations and marked on GM as expressway (toll road). Other roads in vicinity are mostly dirt roads.

Last edited by keber; November 8th, 2011 at 03:52 PM.
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Old November 8th, 2011, 07:09 PM   #1839
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keber View Post
1. Pillars are better not to be in the riverbed
2. It is cheaper as such than having numerous tunnels and/or bridges over river
3. I believe there is probably a demanding geology of the surrounding hills, making slope tunnels very expensive.
3. And last, expressway is actually pretty straight:
http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=sl&ll...h&z=15&vpsrc=6
(from March '10; follow dots of the pillars)
Tracing that highway the entire distance between Chengdu and Xi'an, all that I can say is "WOW!". I can't even begin to imagine how much that road cost to build



Mike
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Old November 8th, 2011, 07:13 PM   #1840
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China expressways opening map (Purple: 2010, Blue: 2011): http://www.china-highway.com/mapabc.html
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