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Old September 7th, 2005, 12:42 AM   #301
Jaye101
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That's for the Old City of Montreal.....The Old City of Toronto is 7000/km2 HAHAHA still win.

You looked at the wrong listing... If you look at the one u looked at youll see it says Population 1million..... if you look at the one "Communaute Urbaine de Montreal" it says 1.8million and 3,625.1/km2

Toronto's CMA is increasing by 9.8...MTL's is increasing by 3.0,

Montreal's ganna get passed in a few years.

Last edited by JayeTheOnly; September 7th, 2005 at 12:51 AM.
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Old September 7th, 2005, 12:56 AM   #302
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cassius
Just because everyone believes something doesn't make it true. Flat earth?
According to a report based on Statistics Canada info, Toronto has a population of 6841/sq mile while Montreal has 4790/sq mile
http://www.demographia.com/db-canua.htm
Just because someone writes something on the internet doesn't means it true.

The data from that site you linked to is for the CMA, not the city proper. For the city proper, Montreal is indeed the most dense city.

Montreal: 5590.7/km square
Toronto :3939.4/km square

Appearently, just because you repeat something it doesn't mean it's true.
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Old September 7th, 2005, 06:25 AM   #303
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These are the real statistics for both official cities. You can check for yourself on Wikipedia.

Toronto - 2.5 million - 3939.4
Montreal - 1.8 million - 3625.1

As you can see both are very comparable but Toronto still comes out on top. I hate when people make statements that aren't true like Toronto is 'golden ground for suburbia' and Montreal is an urban paradise where dense neighbourhoods spread out to the suburbs. The truth of the matter is both cities have dense inner neighbourhoods and alot of urban sprawl in the outer suburbs. I've been to Montreal and there is plenty, plenty of urban sprawl that is just as bad as Toronto's 'american urban sprawl'.
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Old September 7th, 2005, 08:15 AM   #304
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeicow
Just because someone writes something on the internet doesn't means it true.

The data from that site you linked to is for the CMA, not the city proper. For the city proper, Montreal is indeed the most dense city.

Montreal 5590.7/km square
Toronto :3939.4/km square

Appearently, just because you repeat something it doesn't mean it's true.
Of course, I figured that went without saying. However, the source claimed to use Statistics Canada data (whether or not it truely did is up for debate). However, I can pretty much guarantee you that the Toronto CMA does not have a population density of what I stated above (6841). If anything, you have reversed it and provided the CMA density figure, which, of course, would be much lower than the city proper


Edit:
LOL. You're comparing a small portion of Montreal vs the New City of Toronto.
Size of Montreal: 185.94
Size of Toronto: 629.91

Let's take the actual City of Toronto (pre-amalgamation: 1997) and see what happens.

It's awful easy to make your density figures look larger when the area being measured is so small.

Last edited by cassius; September 7th, 2005 at 08:27 AM.
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Old September 7th, 2005, 10:15 AM   #305
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Montreal has slightly denser core area than Toronto. Recently, I took similar size area from each city and calculated their density (using census tract data).

Rank. City: Area km2 - Population - Population per km2

1. Montreal : 65.24 - 638 702 - 9790
2. Toronto: 66.25 - 574 976 - 8679

Looking at each city's metro though, and counting only census tracts that are built up, it is a whole different story

City: Area km2 - Population - Population per km2

Toronto: 1524.84 - 4,333,791 - 2842
Montreal: 1427.52 - 3,152,247 - 2208

So Montreal is the the sprawlier city, and you might notice that its built area almost the same size as Toronto's, despite having lower population (the site Cassius links to actually claims that Montreal urban area is bigger than Toronto, but that is not true).
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Old September 8th, 2005, 03:16 AM   #306
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^ You know that's completely WRONG.

Holy shit, I posted it above no1 listens to me.

Before amalgamations:
Montreal: 1,039,534
Toronto: 676,352

Area:
Montreal: 185.94 Km2
Toronto: 97.15 km2

Density:
Montreal:5,590.8/km2
Toronto: 6,961.9/km2

Where do u ppl get your bullshit?
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Old September 15th, 2005, 06:54 AM   #307
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bump
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Old June 21st, 2006, 08:38 PM   #308
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Canadian Transit Pass Tax Credit

Here's some info for Canadians. More of an announcement, but discuss if you wish.

-------------
Canada Revenue Agency tells monthly public transit pass holders: Keep your pass!

Ottawa, June 19, 2006... The Canada Revenue Agency is advising transit users to keep their monthly transit passes and receipts if they plan to claim a proposed new tax credit for public transit use on their 2006 income tax return.

If a transit pass displays the following information, the pass itself will be sufficient to support a claim for the tax credit:

* an indication that it is a monthly (or longer duration) pass;
* the date or period for which the pass is valid;
* the name of the transit authority or organization issuing the pass;
* the amount paid for the pass; and,
* the identity of the rider, either by name or unique identifier.

If a transit user's pass does not contain all of this information, the Agency advises that transit users also obtain a dated receipt, or retain cancelled cheques or credit card statements, to support the claim. The credit will be available for the portion of the pass that is used on or after July 1st, even if the pass is purchased before that date.


Additional information on how to claim the proposed tax credit for public transit passes will be posted soon on the Canada Revenue Agency Web site at www.cra.gc.ca.

The transit pass credit, announced as part of the May 2006 federal budget, will allow individuals to claim the cost of passes for commuting on buses, streetcars, subways, commuter trains and ferries. In addition to claiming his or her own cost of transit passes, an individual can make a claim on behalf of a spouse or common-law partner, and the individual's children under the age of 19, to the extent that they have not already been claimed by them.




-------------
Additional info from the budget:

Tax Credit for Public Transit Passes

Budget 2006 proposes to allow individuals to claim a non-refundable tax credit for the cost of monthly public transit passes or those passes of a longer duration (e.g., annual passes). Public transit will include transit by local bus, streetcar, subway, commuter train, commuter bus and local ferry. The credit for a taxation year will be calculated by reference to the lowest personal income tax rate for the taxation year (i.e. 15.25 per cent for 2006 and 15.5 per cent for the 2007 and subsequent taxation years). It will be claimable by the individual or the individual’s spouse or common-law partner in respect of eligible transit costs of the individual, the individual’s spouse or common-law partner, and the individual’s dependent children that are under 19 years of age.

Individuals making claims will be required to retain their receipts or passes for verification purposes. Consultations will take place with transit authorities to develop appropriate receipting practices.

This measure will apply in respect of that portion of the cost of public transit passes that is in respect of transit on or after July 1, 2006.

Last edited by zonie; June 21st, 2006 at 08:56 PM.
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Old July 12th, 2006, 09:53 PM   #309
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Canadians Spending More Time Commuting

Commuters spending more time in transit: Statistics Canada
Last Updated Wed, 12 Jul 2006 11:49:09 EDT

The average Canadian spends close to 12 full days a year travelling between work and home, a Statistics Canada study released Wednesday suggests.

The 2005 study found that Canadians spent an average of 63 minutes a day commuting. That compares to 54 minutes in a similar survey in 1992 by the federal agency. "Many Canadians feel that the time that they take in getting to and from work is continually increasing," wrote the study's author, Martin Turcotte, in The Time it Takes to Get to Work and Back.

"The results of this study show that, in many cases, this subjective impression has a basis in fact." Nearly 20,000 people aged 15 and over in the 10 provinces participated in the study, recording their travel times in a daily journal. While commuting times jumped across the country, Torontonians spent the longest time in transit in 2005, spending an average of 79 minutes per round trip, the report suggests.

In Montreal, the average round trip between work and home spanned 76 minutes, up from 62 minutes in 1992. Calgarians spent an average of 66 minutes in round-trip travel.

Travel faster by car

Workers in the Atlantic provinces spent an average of 63 minutes commuting, up sharply from 39 minutes in 1992. Similarly, people in the prairie provinces spent an average of 57 minutes travelling between work and home, compared to 45 minutes in 1992.

The study found that in British Columbia, there was only a marginal increase, with an average commuting time of 60 minutes in 2005, one minute more than in 1992.

The study also revealed that despite the widespread problem of traffic congestion, it is much faster to travel by car than by public transportation. On average, Canadians in cars spent between 51 and 59 minutes on the road, while public transit users endured average travel time of 94 to 106 minutes.

"Above all, the study shows that a sizable gap remains between the two modes from the standpoint of travel times," wrote Turcotte. "It is therefore not surprising that despite higher fuel costs and increased environmental concerns, most workers continue to use mainly their automobile to get to work."
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Old July 13th, 2006, 03:47 AM   #310
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yikes

I am lucky for the last 10+ years I have spent no longer than 15 minutes - usually 10 minutes at most

and thats without ever moving even though my office moved twice from on suburb to another to another

and one job was only a 5 minute walk
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Old July 14th, 2006, 03:00 AM   #311
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Every city except Vancouver
From the Vancouver Sun

"Statistics Canada said average commuting times in all major Canadian cities except Vancouver are getting longer.

The federal agency found commutes in Greater Vancouver take about the same time or a little less than they did in 1992.

But Statistics Canada couldn't explain why that is happening, and TransLink officials were also puzzled.

"We have every indication that traffic volumes have been growing at twice the rate of population growth," said TransLink communications director Ken Hardie. "If you've got more volume it's going to take you longer to get through.""

It's still faster for me to bike to work than to drive or transit though....
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Old July 15th, 2006, 10:26 AM   #312
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Commuters spending more time in transit: Statistics Canada
Last Updated Wed, 12 Jul 2006 11:49:09 EDT
The study also revealed that despite the widespread problem of traffic congestion, it is much faster to travel by car than by public transportation. On average, Canadians in cars spent between 51 and 59 minutes on the road, while public transit users endured average travel time of 94 to 106 minutes.

"Above all, the study shows that a sizable gap remains between the two modes from the standpoint of travel times," wrote Turcotte. "It is therefore not surprising that despite higher fuel costs and increased environmental concerns, most workers continue to use mainly their automobile to get to work."
I would be very quick to question that stat, because what would be the distance relationship between car-commuters and railway commuters? I am not arguing that a bus would be faster than a car, that's idiotic, but if you get on a GO Train in Oakville and race someone on the Express to Union (non-stop, there's quite a few of these in the morning) to their car on the QEW/Gardiner, I guarantee you that that GO Train will kick serious ass in commute times. I'd like to see that travel time for public transit users divided into bus (mixed), busway, train (urban), train(commuter), streetcar(mixed), and streetcar (ROW). Mixed trips can use station to station marks for dividing the stat, but need to calculate transfer times separately from the distances covered between stations in the time calculations, because otherwise it will not accurately reflect the real speed of the service (because not all users transfer, so the figure could become greatly distorted).
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Old July 15th, 2006, 10:37 AM   #313
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Personally, I think transfer times can be quite important and shouldn't be left out, since I know that on a bad day I can spend a total of 15 or 20 minutes waiting for connections. Because face it, very few people live and work both within walking distance of a station.
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Old July 15th, 2006, 10:46 AM   #314
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Quote:
Originally Posted by invincible
Personally, I think transfer times can be quite important and shouldn't be left out, since I know that on a bad day I can spend a total of 15 or 20 minutes waiting for connections. Because face it, very few people live and work both within walking distance of a station.
Actually, for the same reason, I think it is important to separate them. I was never suggesting that transfer times be neglected but segregated. This allows one to not only find an average time of transfering, but can also be used to help pin point bad transfers that desperately need improvement. I think bad transfers can be particularly rampant in some systems. Transfers are arguably among the most important factors in a system but at the same time they can be easily overlooked, especially if the transfer is serviced by competing companies. Special laws governing the planning criteria of transfer stations to make them as smooth as possible within the site and design conditions is something I would love to see.

At the same time, I don't want to statistics of trip times to be obscured by transfers though, because those are inefficiencies of a different nature. It is not the bus or train that is slow, but the transfer between the two that sucks. That's what I want to make clear, otherwise people will be wondering how to make the bus or train faster when in reality they need only look at the transfer.
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Old July 17th, 2006, 08:10 AM   #315
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63 minutes a day commuting?
Does it mean 31.5 minutes from home to work?
It's not bad at all then.
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Old July 17th, 2006, 08:39 AM   #316
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Actually the GO train is painfully slow. If you have ever been on one. In no way could a GO train kick a car's ass if travelling downtown from North York - say at Oriole station. It takes 45 minutes to an hour to get downtown by GO train versus 15 minutes by car.

That's why the majority don't even bother with public transit. It is not very efficient at all in Toronto. We just don't have the money for world class infrastructure.
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Old July 17th, 2006, 08:20 PM   #317
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^ Well .. it doesn't help either when rush hour trains only come every 30 minutes and a replacement bus runs off-hours, with no service on weekends.
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Old March 23rd, 2016, 05:17 PM   #318
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From Rail Journal:

Quote:
http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=535

Canadian infrastructure plan to fund urban rail investment
Wednesday, March 23, 2016



CANADIAN finance minister Mr Bill Morneau announced details of phase 1 of the federal government's new infrastructure plan, which was unveiled as part of the 2016 budget on March 22

The budget allocates $C 3.4bn ($US 2.6bn) in federal funding over the next three years to "upgrade and improve public transit systems across Canada" in a bid to satisfy the need for "immediate investment" in public transport

...

The government says the funding could be used for infrastructure upgrades on the Montreal metro; new metro trains and trams for Toronto Transit Commission; and accelerating design and implementation of major projects, including new light rail lines in Greater Vancouver and Ottawa

...
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Old March 23rd, 2016, 08:09 PM   #319
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Funding from the Fed this budget year.
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Old August 6th, 2016, 05:11 PM   #320
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Players line up for light rail, old rail

Nova Scotia landlords are jumping into the transit debate to push their vision of a green, light-rail future for metro Halifax[...]
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