daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > Birmingham Metro Area

Birmingham Metro Area For Birmingham, Wolverhampton and the West Midlands.



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 9th, 2005, 04:27 PM   #61
brum2003
Registered User
 
brum2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 2,277
Likes (Received): 52

Thats the way with residents comittees, its usally one busy body that drags everyone else along.....

I have actually had soemones equipment siezed (used to live next to an doss house and had a year of parties going on all night, everynight) it took a year to get the equipment siezed and they were very specific about decibell levels etc, sometimes the dj next door managed to get his noise level just right so it could just be heard but was not too loud


The F&B prob was live bands outside on the canalside !!!
If they F&B were warned the amount of times I was led to believe they must have had plenty of time to sort things out....I think they had financial difficulties also as one partner left and the other struggled ? this is all gossip so may not be accurate !!! and i believe thats why they eventually shut, as they could still have bands etc just not outside

the old git in KEW must have been able to hear loud music though his shut windows ? of they would not have done anything about it, unless of course he was a judge or councillor ????
brum2003 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old September 13th, 2005, 12:48 AM   #62
Tetsuro
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 48
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by morestoreysplease
The south side of the city is crying out for an alternative to the 50 bus service.
I couldn't agree more! The traffic on Alcester Road is horrendous on a morning... especially now the schools are back!
Tetsuro no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 22nd, 2005, 12:34 PM   #63
Nacho
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 33

Where's our £1bn - Mids wants transport money Sep 22 2005
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::.



By Jonathan Walker, Political Editor


Two years after Transport Secretary Alistair Darling promised an extra £1 billion to improve transport in the West Midlands, the region is to ask the Government: where's the money?

It should have gone towards boosting a decaying infrastructure and given impetus to projects like the redevelopment of New Street Station.

Mr Darling's 2003 pledge was seen as a disappointment at the time because the West Midlands Multi Modal Study, which examined transport issues along the M6 corridor between the Midlands and Manchester, warned £7.5 billion would be needed to unclog the region's roads over the next three decades.

But councils across the West Midlands claim that even the promised £1 billion has not emerged and warned that schemes, such as extending the metro or rebuilding New Street station, are in jeopardy.

They have warned they may be forced to divert money from housing or regeneration schemes on the basis that better transport links can improve the local economy, the paper warns.

Transport and civic leaders from the seven metropolitan councils tomorrow will be told by officers: "We need to address the issue of what has happened to our £1 billion."

The warning is in a paper to the West Midlands Planning and Transportation Sub Committee. The body is responsible for presenting transport concerns to the Government and includes councillors from Birmingham, Wolverhampton, Coventry, Solihull, Dudley, Walsall and Sandwell, as well as Centro and the passenger transport authority.

A spokeswoman for the Department for Transport said: "In the past five years we have invested £365 million in transport for the West Midlands, as well as support for specific schemes such as the Coventry bus network.

"This is on top of support for improvements to road and rail which benefits the West Midlands, such as upgrading the West Coast Main Line and the M6 Toll road.

"The £1 billion announced by Alistair Darling was to implement the recommendations of the West Midlands Multi Modal Study, and it was always made clear that it remains conditional on the West Midlands drawing up realistic proposals in the local transport plan which can be implemented.
Nacho no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 22nd, 2005, 02:51 PM   #64
pirlo_21
Scaramouche, Scaramouche,
 
pirlo_21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 2,315
Likes (Received): 85

Alistair Darling is a twat , he should not be in charge of transport in this country
__________________
We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm - George Orwell
http://babbage.cs.qc.edu/courses/cs341/IEEE-754.html
pirlo_21 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 22nd, 2005, 03:21 PM   #65
Blunther
Kebab Whore
 
Blunther's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Brummagem, Weoley Castle
Posts: 3,008
Likes (Received): 1

Minister for Crap Eyebrows.
Blunther no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2005, 01:24 PM   #66
morestoreysplease
Brummie Angeleno
 
morestoreysplease's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Birmingham UK, Los Angeles CA
Posts: 8,057
Likes (Received): 211

Wait for the London Olympics transport requests and the money available then, and watch us get the crumbs. I still can't believe that New St is overlooked in the priority scales compared with the London terminii. New St is THE most important station in the UK - end of.
__________________
Birmingham - TheBigCityPlan.

http://justice4the21.blogspot.co.uk/
morestoreysplease no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2005, 06:11 PM   #67
Nacho
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 33

Back on track Property Week | 23.09.2005Network Rail today unveils dramatic new plans for its development portfolio.
Nacho no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2005, 06:14 PM   #68
Nacho
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 33

Years off but could be interesting for Birmingham too.

Blair pushes forward hover train proposal Building | 23 September, 2005Tony Blair has personally intervened to push forward the scrutiny of proposals for a high-speed hovering train link between Glasgow and London, giving the first clear signal that the government is seriously considering the plans, write Sarah Richardson and David Rogers.
Nacho no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2005, 12:23 PM   #69
pirlo_21
Scaramouche, Scaramouche,
 
pirlo_21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 2,315
Likes (Received): 85

maglevs are never gonan happen
__________________
We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm - George Orwell
http://babbage.cs.qc.edu/courses/cs341/IEEE-754.html
pirlo_21 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2005, 01:38 AM   #70
Martin G
Compulsive : Obsessive
 
Martin G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: GET TO FUCK, WHY DON'T YOU?
Posts: 7,308
Likes (Received): 40

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blunther
Minister for Crap Eyebrows.
Martin G no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2005, 05:26 PM   #71
Biosonic
Second Citizen
 
Biosonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 14,417
Likes (Received): 50

What do people think about the following:

GET RID OF THE RING ROAD!!!!!

I was stuck on this shit heap of tarmac for ages yesterday during rush hour, mianly due to minor shunts and the fact there was an exodus from the city centre. It took me an hour to travel the 9 miles home.

Are ring roads beneficial to a city the size of Brum? Would a series of radial routes not be better at coping with rush hour traffic?

THE MIDDLEWAY IS A MILLSTONE ROUND OUR TRANSPORT NECK, much as the inner ring road was for the city centre.
__________________
Birmingham.Brilliance
Biosonic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 01:14 PM   #72
Steve-e-b
Registered User
 
Steve-e-b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: near Springfield, Birmingham
Posts: 685
Likes (Received): 0

I've always found the ring-road really useful for getting across the city (i.e. by-passing the centre) but I've never used it in rush hour, so that's a completly different kettle of fish.
I don't think doing away with the ring road is the right solution. If traffic on the ring road is crawling, I'd suggest building fly-overs or underpasses for the radial routes so that traffic on the ring-road doesn't have to give-way to traffic filing out of the city-centre.
Beyond that, traffic-flow problems are simply down to the sheer number of vehicles on the road and we need to start thinking about car sharing and better public transport.
Steve-e-b no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 01:25 PM   #73
Dazza
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: A Vibrant Urban Village in Birmingham
Posts: 159
Likes (Received): 0

Councils' £1m road charging research Sep 30 2005




By Campbell Docherty, Transport Correspondent


The seven councils of the West Midlands are to ask for more than £1 million from the Government to research congestion charging in the region.

After months of speculation, the move is being seen as the first step towards bid-ding to become the pilot area for a national, satellite-based road pricing scheme.

The leaders of the seven district authorities are proposing a £1.2 million feasibility study, to take place between autumn this year and next summer, to investigate levels of traffic congestion and examine solutions, including road pricing and public transport improvements.



Story continues




The money for the study would come from the Government’s new Transport Innovation Fund (TIF), a pot of £18 million over the next three years for authorities prepared to investigate bold congestion-busting schemes.


Wolverhampton City Council leader Roger Lawrence, who leads on transport for the joint committee, said the future competitiveness and quality of life in the region was at stake.


“What works today may not be effective tomorrow. Bidding for this money doesn’t commit us to any scheme.


“If we are successful it simply gives us the means to assess which options will work for the West Midlands and which ones won’t.”


While the seven districts are not yet publicly committing to road user charging, it is understood the West Midland business community’s vocal support for the idea has helped overcome political concerns.


Simon Murphy, chairman of professional sector lobby group Birmingham Forward, said the region “doing nothing about congestion is simply not an option”.


“We support the decision of the joint leaders. It is vital the region is involved in shaping how the system goes forward,” he said.


John Lamb, spokesman for the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce, said: “It is sensible to go for this, to ignore the opportunities that road pricing carries with it would be to the detriment of the West Midlands as a whole.”


Transport Secretary Alistair Darling is courting the West Midlands as his preferred pilot area for a future national scheme.


The pilot region will also have access to the lion’s share of the TIF fund, which is predicted to reach £2.5 billion a year by 2015, for substantive public transport improvements.


Congestion in the West Midlands is estimated to cost the local economy £2.5 billion every year.


Traffic levels are also predicted to have risen by 15 per cent between 2001 and 2011.


The TIF bid will be formally considered at a meeting of the Joint Committee next Friday.


If agreed, it will be submitted to government that day, with a decision expected in November.


Coun Gary Clarke, chairman of the West Midlands Passenger Transport Authority, said: “If there are major new sources of funding on the horizon, let’s look at the opportunity to position our region to be among the first to benefit.”
Dazza no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 01:46 PM   #74
Biosonic
Second Citizen
 
Biosonic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 14,417
Likes (Received): 50

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-e-b
I've always found the ring-road really useful for getting across the city (i.e. by-passing the centre) but I've never used it in rush hour, so that's a completly different kettle of fish.
I don't think doing away with the ring road is the right solution. If traffic on the ring road is crawling, I'd suggest building fly-overs or underpasses for the radial routes so that traffic on the ring-road doesn't have to give-way to traffic filing out of the city-centre.
Beyond that, traffic-flow problems are simply down to the sheer number of vehicles on the road and we need to start thinking about car sharing and better public transport.
Public transport is the key, and you're right - the problems are due to the sheer number of vehicles on the road.

Flyovers/underpasses won't work because they are anti-pedestrian. Radial route underpasses might work I guess.

My opinion is that the road network should be organised so that traffic leaves the city centre as unhindered as possible. Once the road delivers people to their local 'centre' eg Yardley, Erdington, Selly Oak, Handsworth etc then the roads cater for the move to suburbia. Basically we have too much traffic crossing over the main radial routes, creating stop-start traffic.

An alternative is to build huge MSCP's for park & ride schemes. I would like to see this happen on the site of Selly Oak Hospital when it moves to the new QE building, but I suspect it won't. If people can park securely and get a return train/tram/bus into town for £2.50 I think they will. That is the only way the authorities could even entertain introducing congestion charging too.

I wonder what might happen to traffice flow if/when the Aston Uni/Central Fire Station flyover is dropped?
__________________
Birmingham.Brilliance
Biosonic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2005, 02:00 PM   #75
Nacho
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 33

Government innovation fund sought to boost public transport and tackle West Mids congestion

EMBARGO: Not for publication or broadcast before 00.01 hours, Friday 30 September

Public transport bosses in the West Midlands are planning a joint bid, with local councils, for Government money to look at new ways of cutting congestion.

The conurbation is hoping for preliminary ‘pump-priming’ money from the government’s Transport Innovation Fund (TIF). This new fund is providing up to £18m over the next three years to local authorities prepared to investigate bold schemes – including road pricing – to tackle congestion.

“West Midlands leaders have clearly stated that we want to be at the forefront of the debate to find innovative ways to tackle the growing problem of congestion,” says Cllr Gary Clarke, chairman of the Passenger Transport Authority. “If there are major new sources of funding on the horizon, let's look at the opportunity to position our region to be among the first to benefit.”

“This first stage would be about investigating options before any decisions are made – but it is clear there is already broad agreement that any solution will need to include ways that, with Government support, we can bring about significant improvements in public transport,” he says.

The West Midlands’ TIF bid is proposing an in-depth feasibility study, to take place between autumn this year and next summer, to fully investigate levels of traffic congestion and examine a range of solutions, including necessary public transport improvements.

The West Midlands has already ruled out the possibility of a London-style ‘cordon’ congestion charge. The funding bid to be submitted to Government next week commits the local councils and Centro-PTA to investigating the role of road user charging, but not to implementing any scheme.

Congestion in the West Midlands is an urgent problem which currently costs the local economy £2.5bn every year. Traffic levels are likely to rise by 15 per cent in the decade to 2011 and a recent poll showed drivers rate congestion as a more serious issue than health, education and housing, and second only to crime as something they want tackled.

“Future competitiveness and quality of life in the West Midlands depends on finding effective long term solutions to our congestion problem,” says Wolverhampton Leader Councillor Roger Lawrence, transport lead on behalf of all the Metropolitan Authorities. “What works today may not be effective tomorrow. Bidding for this money doesn’t commit us to any scheme. If we are successful it simply gives us the means to assess which options will work for the West Midlands, and which ones won’t.”

Chair of the Metropolitan Authorities, Solihull Leader Ted Richards, adds: “This isn’t just about transport, this is about looking at how best to tackle a congestion problem that threatens our competitiveness and limits the growth of new jobs and housing in the conurbation, the wider region and the UK as a whole. This is not a commitment to adopt any particular congestion scheme, but it is a recognition that we must look in-depth at congestion – and potential ways of tackling it.”

Substantive TIF funding is due to become available from 2008/09 and is likely to reach £2.5bn nationally by 2014/15.
Nacho no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2005, 12:52 PM   #76
pirlo_21
Scaramouche, Scaramouche,
 
pirlo_21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Birmingham
Posts: 2,315
Likes (Received): 85

expanding local rail routes would help,
__________________
We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm - George Orwell
http://babbage.cs.qc.edu/courses/cs341/IEEE-754.html
pirlo_21 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 10th, 2005, 01:35 PM   #77
Nacho
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 33

Day one for transport revamp Oct 10 2005







THE first phase of the ambitious Wolverhampton Interchange Project was getting under way today.

The £17 million project will bring road, rail, bus and Metro services brought together on a single site in the city centre to enable passengers to make easy transfers.

The Wolverhampton Interchange Project will involve new road accesses to the rail and bus stations, widening Railway Drive, and limiting access to public transport, pedestrians, cyclists and taxis.


* A high-quality covered walkway to link the bus and rail stations;


* An extension of the Midland Metro route from Bilston Street to the Interchange;


* Refurbishment of the multi-storey car park at the rail station;


* Refurbishment of the rail and bus stations; ..TEXT * A state-of-the-art information system to help passengers plan journeys.


Initial work will involve improving the main access to the future Interchange area through the creation of a left only lane and local widening of the Ring Road St Davids / Horseley Fields junction, and improvements at Corn Hill junction.


This includes traffic signals and pedestrian crossing facilities, to provide extra capacity and improved safety.


The phase beginning today is due to be completed next March.


Coun Milkinderpal Jaspal, Wolverhampton City Council's cabinet member for transportation, said: "The work will only be carried out in off-peak hours - between 9.30am and 3.30pm - until November 14.


"From November 14 until January 9, to minimise disruption, work will be carried out overnight between 9pm and 6.30am."


A temporary speed limit of 20mph will be imposed on the southbound Ring Road carriageway within the vicinity of the works for the safety of road users and the workforce.


Horseley Fields will be closed for about ten weeks for the diversion of underground services from January 2006. A diversion route - Bilston Road island, Middle Cross and back on to Horseley Fields - will be signposted.
Nacho no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2005, 07:37 PM   #78
Nacho
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 33

Pilot project will reward people for not using cars Oct 12 2005
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



By Paul Dale, Chief Reporter


A pilot project to reduce peak-time traffic congestion in Birmingham and the West Midlands will be based on rewarding people for not using their cars rather than penalising those who do want to drive.

Mike Whitby (right), leader of Birmingham City Council, said the region's seven metropolitan councils were not interested in imposing a financial penalty on drivers.

Coun Whitby (Con Harborne) was explaining Birmingham's commitment to a pilot study into road pricing, which could see the West Midlands become the first English region to experiment with methods aimed at reducing road usage.

If chosen by the Government, Birmingham and the West Midlands would be able to access a £2 billion fund for public transport improvement - raising hopes that major projects including the rebuilding of New Street Station and the extension of the metro network could be accomplished.


Coun Whitby told a meeting of the Birmingham cabinet: "The leaders of the seven councils are quite clear that they have ruled out workplace levies and cordon-style congestion charging. These are old fashioned methods and aren't seen as tomorrow's world.


"We are only interested in reward-led reform. There will be no ordering around and people will choose what they feel comfortable with. Nothing will be forced on us."


Coun Whitby said the region's approach, rejecting financial penalties in favour of compensating drivers for leaving their vehicles at home, had the backing of Alastair Darling, the Transport Secretary. It was the intention that motorists would be charged for the actual use of their cars.


He was backed by Councillor Paul Tilsley (Lib Dem Sheldon), deputy council leader, who said: "Anything we can do to get away from the very old fashioned technology of placing a cordon sanitaire around a city is the way forward."


David Bull, head of transportation strategy for the city council, said the region's local authorities would look at ways of developing innovative road pricing schemes in an attempt to reduce the annual £2.5 billion cost of congestion.


Mr Bull added: "This is about managing demand for travel in order that we can have successful regeneration."
Nacho no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2005, 07:48 PM   #79
Nacho
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 33

Hall Green train station fails on basic public facilities Oct 12 2005







A suburban Birmingham train station has been named in a report detailing those that have the worst facilities in the country.

The Rail Passengers Council watchdog visited 60 of the largest stations in Britain and a crosssection of 60 small and medium stations.

Hall Green was among the stations that did not boast a telephone while the survey found many other traditional facilities associated with the railway system such as waiting rooms, luggage trolleys, toilets and clocks had disappeared since privatisation.

The report states: "Many also did not have features a passenger might reasonably expect to find, such as a public telephone (which was absent at 15 stations) or a clock (absent at 34 stations), while few had self- service ticket machines."


In particular, the survey reveals many of London's terminals had replaced waiting rooms with commercial cafes - though they are making a comeback at Euston, and Paddington is getting a refurbished waiting room for first class passengers.
Nacho no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 17th, 2005, 01:45 PM   #80
Nacho
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,934
Likes (Received): 33

Delays in £8m railway revamp Oct 14 2005
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



By Adam Smith, Birmingham Mail


RAIL passengers face a month of disruption as the line between Birmingham New Street, Redditch and Bromsgrove gets a £8.7m revamp.

For the next four weekends customers will be forced to board buses or be diverted with journeys taking an extra hour via Kidderminster as construction work takes place at Selly Oak, Lifford, Kings Norton and Barnt Green.

Peter Strachan, Network Rail route director, said: "This major investment in the West Midlands involves the renewal of over four miles of rail as well as new ballast, sleepers and points in large sections of the area.


"The project is part of our commitment to improving the rail infrastructure in the region to provide a more reliable service for passengers."


The rail boss said he hoped the disruption caused would be minimal to rail passengers.


He said: "By doing this work at weekends we hope to keep passenger disruption to a minimum and have worked with train operating companies to provide alternative travel arrangements."


"We would like to thank rail users and our line-side neighbours for their patience while these track renewals are carried out."


During the four consecutive weekends between October 15 and November 6 buses will replace Central Trains services between Birmingham New Street, Redditch and Worcester Shrub Hill and Virgin Cross Country services to the South West will be diverted via Kidderminster.
Nacho no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
centro, network west midlands, roads, trains, tram, transport, wolverhampton metro

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu