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Old January 28th, 2008, 02:15 AM   #1381
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It has been sold but is awaiting developement i do believe. Had anyone noticed the article of office space in the area this morning in the Blade. It just kind of proves my point that the blade never says anything nice about Toledo on the front page...
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Old January 28th, 2008, 03:42 AM   #1382
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I think a Chinese restaurant would be a nice addition to the already varied themes at the Docks.

Also, has the triangle building on S. Erie and Lafayette just been sold or have I been blind for a while?
The Triangle Building have been going through a prepping phase in the past few months, they've closed up all the windows while working and cleaning inside. I've seen vast amounts of debris and junk being hauled out. I also believe it's a historic-designated building so they could perhaps be getting a 6tax credit to develop it as well. There have been numerous of past posts of articles about this development in this thread.
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Old January 28th, 2008, 03:46 AM   #1383
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It has been sold but is awaiting developement i do believe. Had anyone noticed the article of office space in the area this morning in the Blade. It just kind of proves my point that the blade never says anything nice about Toledo on the front page...
This is the exact reason of why we have a Toledo Development thread to counter the negativities, half-truths, mis-truths, lies, and lack of information that is shown by our local media (newspaper, television, radio, and internet). However, most of them do a good job of reporting the development news, but we have to be objective and positive to look at the projects from both sides of the story. I like the in-depth discussions of this thread which many of the articles usually lack.
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Old January 28th, 2008, 03:50 AM   #1384
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Deleted due to Toledo Blade's request.
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Old January 28th, 2008, 03:52 AM   #1385
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I think that this region could support another PF Changs and the perfect location for it is at the former Oasis downtown at the Docks. The Docks already draws people from all over the metro area. Look at PF Changs, this resturaunt drawls people from all over also. The Docks have a wide variety of food from Italian, to Seafood, to Meditranian food. Chinesse would be a major addition to the Docks. The PF Changs at Fallen Timbers is too small. People are always waiting and never getting food. The former Gumbos offers a 2-story building with a sectacular view at downtown Toledo's skyline. Another plus to having that down there is that soon the Marina District will be booming into the region drawling people from all over as well. Dont forget about the new Arena also comming soon to Toledo in 2009. Downtown is about to be changed forever and i really think PF Changs would do well downtown.
Either a Japanese or Thai restaurant would be much better IMO, because it's more classy and the food is cooked lighter which would fit the Docks theme well. P.F. Chang Bistro would be good, I ain't being picky!
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Old January 28th, 2008, 11:34 AM   #1386
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I have the blade from 1-20 i found it in a stack.it does have a pic its not very big kind of sketchy i can try and scan it later when i can get to my scanner It looks pretty cool though, the Column towers over a cool lookin open plaza with trees lining it. not sure how the quality will be... not even sure how im gonna post it on here
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Old January 28th, 2008, 04:29 PM   #1387
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I have the blade from 1-20 i found it in a stack.it does have a pic its not very big kind of sketchy i can try and scan it later when i can get to my scanner It looks pretty cool though, the Column towers over a cool lookin open plaza with trees lining it. not sure how the quality will be... not even sure how im gonna post it on here
When I save pictures or scan pictures, I upload them through Photobucket in order to post the pictures on this site. Here is a direct link: http://photobucket.com/, and it works well for me.
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Old January 28th, 2008, 04:32 PM   #1388
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CSX Intermodal Development Project UPDATE!

This project looks like it's a go since it beat out other locations throughout the midwest region.

CSX buying property for rail yard
By JOY BROWN Posted on FIndlay Courier website


NORTH BALTIMORE -- CSX has bought most of the farmland it needs for an intermodal rail yard between North Baltimore and Hoytville, representatives say.

“Everything is going forward as planned,” said CSX Public Projects Director Dan Murphy.

Records show Paducah, Ky.-based Evansville Western Railway, a CSX affiliate, has bought several parcels along Deshler Road between Range Line and Liberty High roads.

For instance, Gene Barker sold 65 acres at the corner of Deshler and Potter roads to the railroad for $487,500 in September. More than 130 acres to the west, owned by Esther Wagner, were sold for $805,260.

Premiere Partners III, an agricultural asset management firm, also sold eight parcels, including some south of Deshler Road. In April, Premiere CEO Murray Wise had criticized the railroad for “starting off on the wrong foot” with low offers, but later resumed negotiations.

Ken and Zel Uhlenhake, whose property at 2264 Rangeline Road sits on the western edge of the project, were critical a year ago and attempted to unite others in opposing it. They were unsure whether they’d remain in their third-generation home.

But when contacted last week, Zel Uhlenhake said they are negotiating with CSX.

Murphy said the railroad expected to close on four more properties soon.

The purchases make the project all but certain.

Since fall 2006, CSX has been attempting to buy more than 500 acres near its main line that runs east and west between Chicago and the East Coast to construct an intermodal block swap yard.

It initially brokered land options with owners that included nondisclosure clauses.

After The Courier reported the railroad had its eye on the area, forums were held to give the public a general idea of its intentions.

Parts of those forums were hostile. Several residents claimed they were wary of increased traffic in the area and were concerned about safety and the environment. Disappearing farmland and the potential draw to transients and prostitutes were also mentioned.

Some thought CSX might try to acquire land through eminent domain, a practice that allows government and others to buy land without landowners’ consent for public use.

CSX explained the yard will cost up to $75 million, create as many as 100 jobs and add four extra trains per day.

It will serve as an intermodal hub for cargo in large containers. The containers are placed on flatbed trucks and flat rail cars. The yard would also inspect coal cars.

Murphy said North Baltimore is desirable because of its proximity to Interstate 75 and because of the “ability and openness of the area to attract other business,” like warehouses.

Murphy said the company expects to formally announce project details “this spring or late summer.”

“The design process is under way and we’re working on the engineering and drawings,” he said.

CSX spokesman Garrick Francis said construction will start by the end of this year, and it will be operational during the first half of 2010.

Utilities, traffic coordination and potential grants are also being discussed with government, Francis said.

The Wood County Commissioners have already permitted portions of Wingston and Potter roads to be vacated. Murphy said CSX has also been talking with township and North Baltimore officials about “developing an emergency response facility” near the site.

The railroad doesn’t intend to host more forums as it did last winter, but Murphy said through community groups and government leaders, “any forums and meetings they would like to have we’d be delighted to participate in.”
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Old January 28th, 2008, 09:35 PM   #1389
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It's pretty amazing to me that Toledo supports three large universities, all roughly the same size: UT, BGSU and Owens

Ah, Owens is not a UNIVERSITY (meaning four-year, accredited, degree actually matters, etc.). Still, UT and BG is a lot for a metro Toledo's size. Most metros Toledo's size (and even larger) only have one large university.

Owens is terrible for the metro area. It gives kids false hope and is sucking thousands of students away from UT and BG. They would be much better off at a real college and there is absolutely no substitute for that experience. Owens is horrid- no social scene, few clubs, no campus population since it's a community college, joke classes, mostly joke instructors, etc., etc.

This whole community "college" thing is terrible for the universities in Ohio.
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Old January 29th, 2008, 01:00 AM   #1390
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It's pretty amazing to me that Toledo supports three large universities, all roughly the same size: UT, BGSU and Owens

Ah, Owens is not a UNIVERSITY (meaning four-year, accredited, degree actually matters, etc.). Still, UT and BG is a lot for a metro Toledo's size. Most metros Toledo's size (and even larger) only have one large university.

Owens is terrible for the metro area. It gives kids false hope and is sucking thousands of students away from UT and BG. They would be much better off at a real college and there is absolutely no substitute for that experience. Owens is horrid- no social scene, few clubs, no campus population since it's a community college, joke classes, mostly joke instructors, etc., etc.

This whole community "college" thing is terrible for the universities in Ohio.
I have two degree's from Owens, one in Information Technology and one in Computer Programming. That's after I had gone to school at UT for a year and a half, and I learned well more at Owens in their hands-on approach to learning -- at least in their IT. Now, I do intend on going back to UT this fall for my Bachelor's in Computer Science, but thats' because I'd like to go for more of a research purpose.
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Owens has its' niche in the community, in workforce development. Not to mention, most of its' 20,000 students go because its' cheaper than going to UT, BG, OSU, or UM taking Comp I and II. So most of those people do get to experience the college experience.

A lot of the Owen's instructor's are people out in the field already. My first "real" tech job was through an Owens instructor who owned his own company, and I worked as a Mainframe RPG programmer. I now work as a System Administrator in downtown Toledo.

An education is what you make of it. Your looking down on Owens in the same manner people look down at UT or BG with the thinking a degree only counts if its' from prestigious colleges like Boston College, UCLA, etc.

As far as the experience, I give you that. However, while many of my friends are still in college and unsure of their future, I'm out with a nice home, a beautiful wife, a good-paying job, all while meeting new people and having a busy social life. My college debt is minimal.
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Old January 29th, 2008, 04:30 AM   #1391
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I have two degree's from Owens, one in Information Technology and one in Computer Programming. That's after I had gone to school at UT for a year and a half, and I learned well more at Owens in their hands-on approach to learning -- at least in their IT. Now, I do intend on going back to UT this fall for my Bachelor's in Computer Science, but thats' because I'd like to go for more of a research purpose....

...As far as the experience, I give you that. However, while many of my friends are still in college and unsure of their future, I'm out with a nice home, a beautiful wife, a good-paying job, all while meeting new people and having a busy social life. My college debt is minimal.
OK, so Owens isn't technically a "university" - it's a community college. I think Owens does a very good job at its mission - associate's degrees, primarily focusing on technical training, and as a stepping stone to more traditional colleges and universities. I have seen that some students here at BGSU from Owens and other places are not quite as well prepared as the students who started here, but I also find them to be more motivated, grounded and serious about their studies when they do come here. There is plenty about BG and other "universities" that I would love to change - the focus on athletics, Greek life, and drinking. This is my beef with most American universities, not just BG.

Still, there is a sizable youth demographic in Toledo that is has not been identified. Granted, many want to leave NW Ohio and check out greener pastures - which I wholeheartedly encourage - but I often find that people do come home.

Pilliod, you're too condescending toward Owens and other non-traditional schools. I don't know if that is because of your current status as a student at what I recently saw referred to as the "Harvard on the Hocking"?!??! or just a general characteristic, but the people who attend Owens are much more likely to be the ones who establish and nurture roots in cities like Toledo, and keep the manufacturing and services humming along.

[/two cents]
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Old January 29th, 2008, 05:30 AM   #1392
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amen
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Old January 29th, 2008, 05:32 PM   #1393
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Fremont: Crown Battery Co. Expansion UPDATE

Deleted due to Toledo Blade's request.
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Old January 29th, 2008, 05:36 PM   #1394
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Findlay: Thayer Group Development UPDATE

Mayor pans land deals
By JOHN GRABER STAFF WRITER
Posted on Findlay Courier website


New Findlay Mayor Pete Sehnert doesn't like "situations I've inherited" that mix public property with private interests.

He'll have to live with some of the deals former mayor Tony Iriti put in place, but Sehnert intends to block one land use proposal.

Findlay City Council voted last year to give a Lexington, Ky.-based developer, Thayer Group, what could amount to a 99-year lease for the former Brandman tire dump and Swale Park. Thayer plans to build a $90 million development on the city-owned properties.

"That's pretty much a done deal," Sehnert said.

He finds it odd that Thayer Group President Brad Burgess hasn't even touched base with him, though.

"I don't know if he's waiting for the honeymoon to be over or if he's just giving me some time," Sehnert said.

Work on the project, which is supposed to create a cultural corridor between the University of Findlay and downtown, was supposed to begin last month. However, that got pushed back to June because the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is requiring more soil studies.

Another project that Sehnert figures he will have to live with is the new park planned for the downtown intersection of Main and Sandusky streets.

Council is expected to vote during its Feb. 5 meeting on a five-year lease agreement with the owner of the Revolver restaurant, who will pay $1,560 annually for 780 square feet at the park.

Mike Bulkowski, owner of Revolver, intends to set up a small outdoor cafe on the property.

"I just don't think we should be renting out city property," Sehnert said.

In fact, Sehnert doesn't think the city should own that land at all. During his campaign, he openly criticized the decision by council and Iriti to spend $100,000 to purchase and demolish a burned-out building there. Some called it a bailout with public money, because the owner of the building did not appear to be insured.

Meanwhile, Sehnert plans to reverse course on another project.

Local investors hoping to build an $8 million indoor arena for soccer, volleyball and basketball next to the Cube may not get the land lease they were looking for.

City Council voted last month to give the group a one-year option to lease the necessary property, but Sehnert has no intention of following through with the agreement.

"I hope they want to buy (the land) because I'm not going to lease it to them," Sehnert said.

Chuck Bills, president of the investment group, hasn't heard anything to that effect from Sehnert but said his group has other options.

"We have plenty of land, it just made sense for the community there," Bills said.

Some other property situations just need to be clarified, Sehnert said.

The University of Findlay's baseball and softball teams will be playing at new city diamonds next to the Cube this spring, in return for maintenance of the fields, but Sehnert wants everyone to know the university will not have sole access to those fields.

"There's a rumor going around that they are going to be in charge and they are not going to be in charge," Sehnert said.

A University of Findlay spokesman did not return a call for a comment Monday afternoon.

The same goes for two soccer fields being built by the Afternoon Rotary Club on the south end of Emory Adams Park.

"Our plans are to have lighting, a scoreboard, irrigation ... bleacher seating," said Michael Lewis, chairman of the Rotary community projects committee and the boys' competitive director of the Findlay Soccer Club.

That all sounds fine to Sehnert, but he wants to make it clear that everybody will have access to the new soccer fields.

"If they say we want to be the only one using it, well our Rec Department is in charge of that," Sehnert said.

That has been clear since the beginning of the project, Lewis said.

"These fields would be completely at the discretion of the city for use by the public," Lewis said.
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Old January 29th, 2008, 09:29 PM   #1395
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Pilliod, you're too condescending toward Owens and other non-traditional schools. I don't know if that is because of your current status as a student at what I recently saw referred to as the "Harvard on the Hocking"?!??! or just a general characteristic, but the people who attend Owens are much more likely to be the ones who establish and nurture roots in cities like Toledo, and keep the manufacturing and services humming along.

My problem with Owens is simple: It's hurting UT and BG. There is no argument to counter that. UT is not full, not anywhere near full, and BG sometimes struggles to maintain its population. All the while, Owens has exploded. Community colleges compete with universities, and it's gotten vicious judging by the commercials I've seen in Toledo.

Community colleges suck students away from universities, and students can never have the "college experience" at a school like Owens, period. While it's great some people are doing well with their associates and technical degrees, that doesn't change the fact that it's a cheap alternative to real college and their presence at Owens is a vacancy at UT or BG. Price is its selling point, but it's cheap for a reason. I'm not one to put too much stock into degrees (ANY degree), as I think even most bachelor's degrees are jokes these days, certainly ones from schools in Ohio. When you explore markets like LA, New York, Chicago, and Boston, you'll find your degree from Ohio State, Miami, Ohio, Cincinnati, Toledo, etc. doesn't carry nearly as much weight as it does in Ohio. The reason for this is because Ohio is one of the most uneducated states in the country and even if a school is hard to get into, our reputation for academic rigor is lukewarm at best. You always here the horror stories of employers asking "Did you regret going to <insert school's name> in Ohio?" Undergrad at ANY public university in this state is not too challenging unless you pick a hard major like organic chemistry or mechanical engineering (which are hard anywhere you go). We are widely known as a football (OSU in sports magazines) and party (OU in Playboy) state. We also have a reputation as a teacher factory, which is an insult. Education majors are amongst the easiest on earth. Paying for school (and sometimes working while a full-time student) is what makes things challenging. School itself is not the problem. All the pressure put on kids these days is the problem. What's a student who has to pay for classes, health insurance, food, and housing supposed to do? Take out $75,000 for undergrad?! The high costs have fueled this community college explosion. Of the kids I know at Owens, most would prefer to be at UT and BG, but can't afford it. The reason Ohio struggles is due to its community college mentality, which have made Owens and CSCC two of the largest schools in the state. Owens and CSCC should be nowhere near their size. Sure, more people from UT and BG (and every other university in this state) move out after graduation, but that's because their degree gives them more options, or at least gets them into a grad school, which is where academia becomes more challenging. Owens kids are much more likely to stay in Ohio because their credits are far less likely to transfer to schools in other states. It's pretty simple.

"Harvard on the Hocking"

Almost everyone from OU has a superiority complex and hatred for the other schools in the state, because once you see how ugly and boring other schools can be, you appreciate OU that much more. The nickname, however, comes from the architecture and historic green which was modeled after Harvard's, not academics. It's more of a joke really since OU is a party school before anything else, albeit a party school that looks like it belongs in the Ivy League.

Still, there is a sizable youth demographic in Toledo that is has not been identified.

I certainly agree. The fact it's largely overlooked is precisely the reason so many kids leave after graduation. This MUST change. Still, even Columbus bleeds just as many college grads as the other cities in the state (they are just lucky enough to offset this by pulling from the other cities in the state). Out-migration from OSU is no different from Toledo, Bowling Green, OU, Miami, Cincinnati, etc. Kids just want to get the hell out of Ohio, myself included since I need a warmer climate due to asthma.

An education is what you make of it.

Well, obviously, but you're also getting a label attached to yourself. How far a degree travels is based on a school's reputation, whether it's fair or not. It also affects your ability to get into other schools down the road. Owens will not be given much, if any credit outside the state of Ohio. Can someone from Owen's be successful? Of course. You don't need ANY education to be successful, and success should really be based on internal goals, not the mandates of mainstream society. Can someone from Owens get into Michigan? That's about as likely as me marrying Jessica Alba. Really, Owens can just make future academic pursuits more challenging and time-consuming as opposed to having started a degree at a univeristy.

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Old January 30th, 2008, 03:25 AM   #1396
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Pilliod, you're too condescending toward Owens and other non-traditional schools. I don't know if that is because of your current status as a student at what I recently saw referred to as the "Harvard on the Hocking"?!??! or just a general characteristic, but the people who attend Owens are much more likely to be the ones who establish and nurture roots in cities like Toledo, and keep the manufacturing and services humming along.

My problem with Owens is simple: It's hurting UT and BG. There is no argument to counter that. UT is not full, not anywhere near full, and BG sometimes struggles to maintain its population. All the while, Owens has exploded. Community colleges compete with universities, and it's gotten vicious judging by the commercials I've seen in Toledo.

Community colleges suck students away from universities, and students can never have the "college experience" at a school like Owens, period. While it's great some people are doing well with their associates and technical degrees, that doesn't change the fact that it's a cheap alternative to real college and their presence at Owens is a vacancy at UT or BG. Price is its selling point, but it's cheap for a reason. I'm not one to put too much stock into degrees (ANY degree), as I think even most bachelor's degrees are jokes these days, certainly ones from schools in Ohio. When you explore markets like LA, New York, Chicago, and Boston, you'll find your degree from Ohio State, Miami, Ohio, Cincinnati, Toledo, etc. doesn't carry nearly as much weight as it does in Ohio. The reason for this is because Ohio is one of the most uneducated states in the country and even if a school is hard to get into, our reputation for academic rigor is lukewarm at best. You always here the horror stories of employers asking "Did you regret going to <insert school's name> in Ohio?" Undergrad at ANY public university in this state is not too challenging unless you pick a hard major like organic chemistry or mechanical engineering (which are hard anywhere you go). We are widely known as a football (OSU in sports magazines) and party (OU in Playboy) state. We also have a reputation as a teacher factory, which is an insult. Education majors are amongst the easiest on earth. Paying for school (and sometimes working while a full-time student) is what makes things challenging. School itself is not the problem. All the pressure put on kids these days is the problem. What's a student who has to pay for classes, health insurance, food, and housing supposed to do? Take out $75,000 for undergrad?! The high costs have fueled this community college explosion. Of the kids I know at Owens, most would prefer to be at UT and BG, but can't afford it. The reason Ohio struggles is due to its community college mentality, which have made Owens and CSCC two of the largest schools in the state. Owens and CSCC should be nowhere near their size. Sure, more people from UT and BG (and every other university in this state) move out after graduation, but that's because their degree gives them more options, or at least gets them into a grad school, which is where academia becomes more challenging. Owens kids are much more likely to stay in Ohio because their credits are far less likely to transfer to schools in other states. It's pretty simple.

"Harvard on the Hocking"

Almost everyone from OU has a superiority complex and hatred for the other schools in the state, because once you see how ugly and boring other schools can be, you appreciate OU that much more. The nickname, however, comes from the architecture and historic green which was modeled after Harvard's, not academics. It's more of a joke really since OU is a party school before anything else, albeit a party school that looks like it belongs in the Ivy League.

Still, there is a sizable youth demographic in Toledo that is has not been identified.

I certainly agree. The fact it's largely overlooked is precisely the reason so many kids leave after graduation. This MUST change. Still, even Columbus bleeds just as many college grads as the other cities in the state (they are just lucky enough to offset this by pulling from the other cities in the state). Out-migration from OSU is no different from Toledo, Bowling Green, OU, Miami, Cincinnati, etc. Kids just want to get the hell out of Ohio, myself included since I need a warmer climate due to asthma.

An education is what you make of it.

Well, obviously, but you're also getting a label attached to yourself. How far a degree travels is based on a school's reputation, whether it's fair or not. It also affects your ability to get into other schools down the road. Owens will not be given much, if any credit outside the state of Ohio. Can someone from Owen's be successful? Of course. You don't need ANY education to be successful, and success should really be based on internal goals, not the mandates of mainstream society. Can someone from Owens get into Michigan? That's about as likely as me marrying Jessica Alba. Really, Owens can just make future academic pursuits more challenging and time-consuming as opposed to having started a degree at a univeristy.
Don't blame UT and BG's lack of growth to Owens. Perhaps UT and BG need to look further into attracting students from outside the region, as about 90% of the students that go to those schools are commuters. UT, especially, needs to market itself more as a true research university, and perhaps it can continue to grow with the momentum they have from the merger.

By the way, I have three friends that attended Owens for 1 year to take some of the basic courses and bump their GPA up. Two went to Ohio State and one is at Michigan State.
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Old January 30th, 2008, 05:00 AM   #1397
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^Ohio State accepts Owens credits. Most universities in Ohio do. Michigan State would be so-so. It would depend on the major. MICHIGAN (the toughest public school in the Midwest) would probably not accept anything.

Still, there are a hell of lot of major tracks where going to Owens would be just a waste of time. Many credits would not transfer or would be viewed as electives. For university programs that have a full four years of major classes, Owens is just tacking on another two years. Some easy majors (like education) only have two years of major courses, but that's not the norm. Any difficult major will have three or four years of major-only courses. Nothing from community college can substitute. In short, if you go to Owens, do your research ahead of time. It really depends on what program you're looking at and what school it is. As schools become more specialized, fewer Owens credits are transferring except as electives.

Perhaps UT and BG need to look further into attracting students from outside the region, as about 90% of the students that go to those schools are commuters.

Ah, no. This is not Cleveland State. Fewer than half of UT students are commuters, and very few BG students are commuters. The vast majority of BG students now come from the Cleveland area.

UT has a history as a commuter school, but that's not accurate anymore. It is roughly equal to Ohio State's or Cincinnati's commuter percentage. 5,000 students live on the Bancroft campus alone. While that's less than a school like OU with 10,000 on the main campus (literally almost every single freshman and sophomore), that's over half of the freshman and sophomores. UT has gained students on campus and in adjacent neighborhoods. Bowling Green is more similar to Miami or OU- it's a true college town. The vast majority of students live on campus or adjacent to it.

Kent State, Cleveland State, Wright State, and Youngstown are the true commuter schools in Ohio. The majority of kids at those schools are commuters. Cleveland State is the highest with a full 80% of its student population hailing from Cuyahoga County. Even Ohio State only has 24% of its student body living on campus. That's the same as UT, and far, far less than OU which has nearly half the school living on campus. Every Ohio school except OU (least number of commuters), Miami (second least), and Bowling Green (third least) has a large commuter element. At some schools, commuters are the majority. Luckily, UT is no longer one of those schools.

Perhaps UT and BG need to look further into attracting students from outside the region

UT does this in spades. They go for Michigan students. They offer in-state tuition and many scholarships for kids hailing from the Southeast Michigan area. UT also has a large international percentage when compared to other schools in the state.

Last edited by Pilliod Njaim; January 30th, 2008 at 05:24 AM.
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Old January 30th, 2008, 05:29 AM   #1398
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OK so how about getting back to DEVELOPEMENTS!
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Old January 30th, 2008, 09:31 AM   #1399
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Whats wrong with JUCO? not all of us can afford "real college" like all these rich Cleveland kids at BG. Most of my graduating high school class started at Owens. I had a few friends get scholarships for sports and a few ended up transfering to 1A schools. Is Lourdes College also bad for UT and BG? Davis? I just read in the paper the other day that UT's enrollment was up.

And on some development........ Has anyone been to the new indoor water park in Maumee? I havent really heard much about it but I know its open. Admission Rates and any other kind of info would be cool....
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Old January 30th, 2008, 01:42 PM   #1400
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mudhen419 View Post
Whats wrong with JUCO? not all of us can afford "real college" like all these rich Cleveland kids at BG. Most of my graduating high school class started at Owens. I had a few friends get scholarships for sports and a few ended up transfering to 1A schools. Is Lourdes College also bad for UT and BG? Davis? I just read in the paper the other day that UT's enrollment was up.

And on some development........ Has anyone been to the new indoor water park in Maumee? I havent really heard much about it but I know its open. Admission Rates and any other kind of info would be cool....
I have multiple pictures of the construction project for the indoor water park in previous posts of this thread. Here is the direct website of "Splash Bay Resort": http://www.splashbayresort.com/

I know the family who owns it personally, they are very good people and the business locally-owned.
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