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Old February 29th, 2008, 10:47 PM   #1561
4silverrings
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Proposed Downtown Toledo Gateway & Loop

Proposal: Developing a Main Downtown Toledo Gateway from I-75 Highway

Posted from my blog: www.nextsteptoledo.blogspot.com

Quote:
Executive Summary
Downtown Toledo lacks a main downtown gateway road interchange that allows people to easily enter and leave the downtown area. A main gateway should be designed to provide easy access for those who live, work, and visit downtown. In addition to creating simplified driving routes, the main gateway would assist further development of the downtown area. The gateway would fuse the entrance ramps and exit ramps to and from I-75 to the same interchange system. This localization, and creation of a full interchange, will allow investments into businesses and city beautification to be centralized and focused in an effort to increase effectiveness

Proposed Downtown Gateway
The main Downtown Toledo I-75 gateway should provide easy access to the downtown office buildings, 5/3 Field, the future arena, the Seagate Center, the Erie Street Market, and the bridges across the Maumee River. The gateway would need adequate space for a full interchange with as little demolition as possible. The gateway should provide a scenic view of Downtown Toledo and provide simple, efficient traffic flow.

Image Above

The Downtown I-75 Gateway would achieve the goals of the project by being developed south of downtown at the I-75/Anthony Wayne Trail interchange. The Anthony Wayne Trail interchange is classified as a partial interchange as it lacks half of the directions of a full interchange. The location and current road setup make the AW interchange the most desirable. Railroad tracks once took up much of the land heading into the Warehouse District, and with their removal, there is a large amount of available land around the area. The redevelopment of the interchange into a full interchange would allow for traffic from both the Anthony Wayne Trail and I-75 to enter Downtown Toledo and disperse to intended destinations. The gateway area between the interchange and downtown would be renovated and a small park and boulevard developed, with 3 lanes per direction.

Proposed Loop
A downtown loop can then be developed using the streets that connect to the AW Trail, as north Anthony Wayne Trail turns into N. Erie St. loops by the Lucas County Courthouse and returns to South Anthony Wayne Trail via N. Michigan St. The loop itself is already in place and can be advertised as a central investment area. The north loop provides access to downtown condos and lofts, the Warehouse District, 5/3 Field is one block from the loop, as will be the new arena. Serviced by the south loop are the Lucas County Courthouse, administrative buildings, the downtown library, the Greyhound station, S, the Pilkington building, as well as a gas station prior to the I-75 entrance ramp. The loop also provides easy access to The Greenbelt Parkway and thus I-280.

My original goal was provide insight into improvements and renovations that could be done in the Toledo area. This is my first attempt at getting some of my ideas on paper and on screen. Your feedback is greatly appreciated!




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Old February 29th, 2008, 11:21 PM   #1562
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Welcome 4silverrings, thank you for the post in regards to this project. We are all looking forward in providing inputs and learning more about this project.
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Old February 29th, 2008, 11:23 PM   #1563
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Perrysburg: Former Delafoil Redevelopment Project

Perrysburg Delafoil plant sold
By CHRIS MILLER Sentinel Staff Writer
Posted on BG Sentinel-Tribune website 2-29-2008


PERRYSBURG — Something is brewing at the old Delafoil manufacturing facility along Ohio 25, and it could be good news for Perrysburg and the region.
According to recent real estate transfers reported by the Wood County Real Estate Division, the Delafoil facility, a commercial property, has been sold for $7 million to Spring Grove Trading Company, LLC.

The real estate transfer was reported in the House & Home Section of Thursday’s Sentinel-Tribune.

According to the Ohio Secretary of State’s Office, the agent for Spring Grove Trading Company is Michael Cicak. He’s a Perrysburg Township resident and past president of Solar Cells, forerunner of the now-notable First Solar company which produces photovoltaic solar modules at its township plant in Cedar Business Park.

A phone message seeking comment on the recent Delafoil purchase was left at Cicak’s home this morning, but had not been returned by press time late this morning.

Perrysburg city officials acknowledge there is interest in the Delafoil facility, a sprawling 250,000 square-foot manufacturing and warehouse site located on the east side of Route 25, across from the new Harbor Town Place commercial development and about a mile south of Levis Commons. The address of the Delafoil facility is 1775 Progress Drive.

City officials are not commenting on the exact nature of the expected new business.

Will it be a new solar module manufacturing facility, further solidifying Wood County’s status as an emerging hotbed of alternative energy production and usage here in Ohio?

No one is saying publicly just yet.
Rick Thielen, the city’s planning, zoning and economic development administrator, earlier this month said he’s hopeful some “good news will break yet this year.”

Perrysburg Administrator John Alexander, contacted this morning, confirmed the city has been in contact with “representatives of the new owners” of the Delafoil facility.

“We’re not in a position to discuss the nature of those communications,” Alexander said. “But we believe the general outline, with their business plan, will be beneficial to the region.”

He said the city is “aware of the sale of the building and we’re very pleased it appears it will once again be occupied. We always recognized it as a versatile structure that could be used for manufacturing and warehousing.”

Delafoil was a Pennsylvania-based manufacturer of television components that opened its $46 million Perrysburg facility in 1996. The company produced components used in TV picture tubes, including magnetic shields. It was the largest single industrial investment in Perrysburg at the time.

At its peak it employed about 250 workers. But the company fell on hard times when its main customer, LG Phillips, closed its TV production plant in Ottawa and moved to Mexico.

Delafoil attempted restructuring itself, closing its Pennsylvania facility and consolidating operations here in Perrysburg in 2003. The company cut its workforce, received numerous tax breaks, and attempted marketing its magnetic shielding for automotive and construction applications. Delafoil closed for good in 2005.

Another company, Proline, began using part of the facility under a lease arrangement in late 2005, but closed the following summer. Proline provided bulk food packaging for Campbell Soup and H.J. Heinz.
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Old February 29th, 2008, 11:43 PM   #1564
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Regional Retail Developments

Menards, Wal-Mart open new locations in Oregon, Perrysburg
By Justin R. Kalmes Toledo Free Press Managing Editor
and Duane Ramsey Senior Business Writer
Posted via website 2-29-2008


Two retail giants will open the doors to new properties in the Toledo area this week, adding to the expanding business landscapes in Oregon and Perrysburg.

Wisconsin-based home improvement retailer Menards is set to open its 240,000-square-foot store near Interstate 280 in Oregon March 4 as part of the company's plan to add an estimated 15 stores in 2008, two of which will be in Northwest Ohio. Menards expects to open a location on Alexis Road in Toledo in late spring or early summer. The company's Holland store on Airport Highway opened in 2005.

The world's largest employer, Wal-Mart, is opening its newest store in Northwest Ohio March 5 on state Route 20 in Perrysburg, adding more retail competition to the growing commercial area.

The Perrysburg location is one of four Wal-Mart Supercenters opening in Ohio the first week of March with stores opening in Bedford, Lancaster and Warren. The four new stores will bring 1,265 news jobs and additional tax revenues to the state, Wal-Mart officials said.

The Oregon Menards will employ between 165 and 175 employees, about 50 percent of whom will work full time, said general manager Dave Long. Of the store's total number of employees, about 120 were local hires, he said. Long leads a leadership team that will include two assistant general managers, 10 department managers and 18 assistant department managers.

Long, who worked as general manager of the Holland location for about 18 months before reporting to the Oregon store Jan. 14, said each Menards carries more than 750,000 different items. Though the store specializes in hardware and home improvement and building supplies, it also carries a variety of other products, including clothing and groceries.

“Even though we sell milk and eggs, we're still a lumberyard at heart,” Long said.

The Oregon Menards will feature new displays product lines that will eventually be made available at other locations, Long said. Worth checking out, he said, is the store's patio block display, which showcases five semi-loads of slabs arranged to exhibit several different possibilities.

“It truly gives you a feel of what you can do in your backyard,” Long said, noting Menards does not compete with local contractors by offering installation services like its competitors do.

Other store features of note include a garden center and a design center that allows customers to use a computer to map out their home improvement projects. The technology creates a materials list to match the user's design specifications.

Long said the store's mission is to provide customers with a one-stop shop to purchase everything they need to complete a project.

“We are truly dedicated to service and quality,” he said in reference to the company's motto.

The company's controlled growth throughout the Midwest has set Menards apart from its competitors by ensuring its employees have the knowledge they need to exceed customers' expectations, Long said.

“We have the opportunity to train our team members to make sure they're ready when we open the store,” he said.

Marv Prochaska, vice president of real estate for Menards, said the company's success at its Holland location led to its decision to open two more stores in the area. He said the company would decide if the market warrants more stores based upon the success of the Oregon and Toledo locations.

Gary Thompson, executive director of the Oregon Economic Development Foundation, said Menards is the type of store that has goods people use in everyday life. He said community leaders hope the opening leads to more retailers locating in Oregon.

“It means people living and working here in Oregon can spend their money here in Oregon as well,” Thompson said. “We're always excited about keeping the local dollar in the local economy.”

Menards will host a contractor preview night from 6 to 8 p.m. March 3 and will open to the public March 4. The store's grand opening is set for March 29 and will feature an appearance by former Detroit Tigers outfielder Willie Horton, Long said.

The Oregon Menards will be open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday.

Wal-Mart opens Perrysburg store

The Perrysburg Wal-Mart will employ around 300 associates with the majority of the positions being full time, manager Russell Sporysz said. The national average wage for Wal-Mart full-time associates is $10.65 per hour.

“We think our new associates will find that Wal-Mart is a great place to work and full of opportunity for those looking for advancement and want to make a career here,” said Sporysz, who began his career with the company 10 years ago as a cart pusher at a store in South Carolina.

The 176,000-square-foot store offers more than 175,000 different items with a full line of groceries. Non-food merchandise includes apparel and accessories, fine jewelry, furniture, health and beauty aids, toys, lawn and garden supplies, and electronics.

Another feature is Wal-Mart's “site-to-store” option, which allows customers to order items online and pick them up at the company's nearest location.

Wal-Mart stores also support Ohio manufacturers by carrying products from companies like the Ballerich Chip Company, Keystone Meats, Ole Mexican Products, Ghossian's MidEast Bakery and DiRusso Sausage.

Additional services include a one-hour photo lab, a pharmacy with two drive-through lanes and a Wal-Mart Connect Center for wireless sales. A SmartStyle family hair salon, a branch of Woodforest Bank and a Subway restaurant are located within the store.

The Perrysburg store will be open from 6 a.m. to midnight every day.

The store will host a grand opening ceremony at 7:15 a.m. March 5. It will open for business following the
ceremony.

Grand opening activities planned for the day include product samples, giveaways and character appearances. Sporysz said that grand opening grants from the store would be distributed to nine local organizations that have a positive impact on the community.

Most of the funds will support local educational programs. A total of $18,000 will be distributed to area organizations like the Ohio Division of the American Cancer Society, Miracle League of Northwest Ohio, Young Women's Christian Association, Penta County Career Center, Perrysburg school district and Perrysburg police and fire departments.

“Wal-Mart has a long history of supporting educational initiatives,” Sporysz said.

The Perrysburg store is the fifth Wal-Mart Supercenter located in the Toledo area with other stores on West Central Avenue and Glendale Avenue in Toledo, Navarre Avenue in Oregon and at Spring Meadows in Holland. Wal-Mart also operates stores in Bowling Green, Bryan, Fremont, Napoleon and Wauseon.

Wal-Mart was seeking a site for an additional Supercenter in North Toledo possibly along Alexis Road, a company official said in October.

Discount clothing retailer Burlington Coat Factory plans to open a store in the Airport Square Shopping Center on Airport Highway just west of Reynolds Road.
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Old March 1st, 2008, 12:16 AM   #1565
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Downtown Retail Developments

AH HAAAA!!!! I knew it due to the fact that they are NOT closed despite of the poor reporting from several media outlets indicated they were closed. It's a good thing that not everything is so doom-and-gloom these days. Thank goodness for this website to allow us to post and discuss constructive, positive developmental news.

Jackson's Lounge remains open as banquet facility
By Brandi Barhite
Special Sections Editor [email protected]


Jackie Mullen, office manager for the retired NBA player Jim Jackson, said Jackson's Downtown restaurant is not open for lunch, but is running as a full-service banquet facility, hosting private parties, luncheons, business meetings and special events.

Mullen, who runs the restaurant at night, said recent media reports that Jackson's was closed were made without confirming facts.

“We are not closed,” she said.

Jackson's lunch business was stopped because the person leasing the kitchen for the day left the restaurant, Mullen said. Negotiations are under way to bring in a new person for the lunch hour. Jackson's Lounge, 233 N. Huron St., is open from 6 p.m. to midnight Mondays for “Martini Mondays.” All martinis are $3 and wings are 30 cents.

Jackson's also hosts ballroom, step and line dancing every third Thursday of the month. Starting March 8, the restaurant will host a professional networking event, Mullen said.
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Old March 1st, 2008, 04:35 AM   #1566
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Warehouse District Development

Two media articles in regards the Swan Creek project (WNWO 24 NBC and WTOL 11 CBS):

City plans for downtown river walk
Townhouses, shops to go near Swan Creek
By Matt Trezza
Posted: Friday, February 29, 2008


SWAN CREEK -- Mayor Finkbeiner is unveiling a plan for a thriving river walk community near downtown Toledo. He hopes the Swan Creek development will begin a new renaissance for the city. Today, Swan Creek is lonely, desolate and polluted. The mayor introduced a vision of what the City of Toledo thinks it could be in the not so distant future.

“Fifteen years from now,” he says, “people will be highly charged, energized about finding a place to live in, have an office in, dine in, be entertained in, or just plain stroll along the waterfront.”

The city is working with Tetra Tech to make it happen. The company which opened a Toledo office helped develop high-profile riverfront projects like the ones in San Antonio and Indianapolis.

“I was proud of the city,” says lifelong Toledoan, Andrew Langenderfer, “when I visited San Antonio and I came back, when I saw Swan Creek I said there's our San Antonio River Walk.”

Over the next year, Tetra Tech will conduct a feasibility study to put together their plan for development along Swan Creek. The city hopes Swan Creek will compliment the marina district being built at the other end of downtown.

“Bring Swan Creek back to the forefront as the natural resource that it is,” says Jeffrey Fleischman, who works for Tetra Tech, “to do that we're going to bring people, activities and an economic engine to the area.”

Mayor Finkbeiner says the city is forming a long-term partnership with Tetra Tech on the Swan Creek project. He says the company is paying for the feasibility study.

One of the barriers to getting it done has been Swan Creek's ecosystem. It would be prohibitively expensive for a private developer to clean-up the water and soil there that's been polluted from years of local manufacturing. Tetra Tech hopes this partnership with the city will help them get government funding to clean the area up and move ahead with the project.



Major revitalization project proposed along Swan Creek
Posted WTOL 11 Website Feb 29, 2008


TOLEDO -- Mayor Carty Finkbeiner announced Friday the city's vision for a major revitalization project along Swan Creek in Toledo's Warehouse District.

The city is focusing on Swan Creek from its mouth at the Maumee River to I-75. News 11's Shelley Brown has the details.

We're talking about a whole new neighborhood surrounding the Erie Street Market along Swan Creek.

But first, millions of dollars in environmental cleanup -- dollars the mayor believes could come from the state and federal governments. It's a project the mayor says the city can't afford to pass up.

In the Warehouse District, the city is hoping to develop 50 to 100 acres along Swan Creek into a vibrant waterside neighborhood. Mayor Carty Finkbeiner explained it as, "A San Antonio-type riverwalk along the Swan Creek, and right in the middle of that is the Erie Street Market."

The mayor adds that it's a chance to improve Swan Creek as a natural resource and provide greater public access to it. "The vision calls for single family homes, townhouses, shopping opportunities, business offices, restaurants, boating opportunities and a pedestrian riverwalk along the Swan Creek."

Tetra Tech, a national planning and engineering firm, is working with the city at "no cost" to study the plan. Jeff Fleischman of Tetra Tech told News11, "We're going to bring people, activities, an economic engine to the area."

But not without significant environmental cleanup first of the water and soil, exposed and contaminated by industry for years. Developer Larry Dillin said "I think it's a compliment to what we're doing at the Marina District." The marina district is set to open next spring and the downtown arena after that.

This project -- if all goes as planned -- would follow. Though planners say it could be a 10 to 15 year project. Bob Rosencrantz of the Erie Street Chowder House said, "We need growth in the city, you know. I hope there's enough bodies to fill all of this proposed project."

The next step?

City council will vote whether to enter into an agreement with Tetra Tech to move forward on a feasibility plan.
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Old March 1st, 2008, 07:22 AM   #1567
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This all sounds too good to be true
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Old March 1st, 2008, 04:26 PM   #1568
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BG: Stroh Center Development

Deleted due to Toledo Blade's request.
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Old March 2nd, 2008, 05:21 PM   #1569
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Port Authority: Transportation Development

Deleted due to Toledo Blade's request.
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Old March 2nd, 2008, 05:23 PM   #1570
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Perrysburg: Commodore Perry Development

Deleted due to Toledo Blade's request.
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Old March 3rd, 2008, 03:47 AM   #1571
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Plans are for construction of the Stroh Center to begin in 2010 and be completed by 2012. It is to have seating for 5,000 to watch basketball and volleyball games, graduation ceremonies, and other events.

What the hell?! 5,000?! That's a joke and no larger than Anderson Arena. OU's Convocation Center holds 13,000 and can fill up for big basketball games and concerts. UT's renovated Savage Hall will hold 9,000 to 10,000 for games and concerts. It too can sell out. Why in the hell is BG building something so small? It seems with a major university and proximity to Toledo, Bowling Green should have a much larger arena. I can't believe they're building something with only 5,000 seats. I mean, shit, Athens is in the middle of nowhere, is 70 miles from the nearest big city, and it has a 13,000-seat arena (even more for concerts). Bowling Green can handle that since it's the same size AND can draw from metro Toledo. I was at least hoping for something with 7,500 seats for basketball and maybe a little more for concerts...

Did the fact there's going to be two large, high-class arenas in Toledo affect their decision? I don't think it should make a difference since most NCAA D1 schools of BG's size have a large arena of at least Savage Hall caliber.

And that rendering looks like crap...really cheap and not very "university." The only positive thing I can say about it is the name is great. "Stroh" will automatically become "Stroh's" since that's one of the staple beers of college keg parties.

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Old March 3rd, 2008, 04:06 AM   #1572
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The 50 to 100 acres could include office space, homes, shops, and a waterfront promenade.

Key to the development would be the idea of a dense, mixed-use development, with residents living there contributing to pedestrian activity and vitality, said Gonzalo Echeverria of the architectural and planning firm Looney Ricks Kiss of Princeton, N.J.

The end result would be much like San Antonio's River Walk, Mr. Finkbeiner said.


This would be awesome, and more fitting for the "River Walk" development like in San Antonio, which is really not a river, but more of a creek or canal.

Toledo has a bona fide river with the Mighty Maumee, and Marina District development should focus on that. I know Carty in the past had proposed digging a canal between Front Street and the Maumee River. Frankly, I didn't see the point since Toledo already has a great riverfront to work with and digging a canal would be overkill. The San Antonio type project is much more fitting along Swan Creek than the Maumee River. Swan Creek is similar in size to what they have in San Antonio. It's narrow and easy to build pedestrian bridges across.
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Old March 3rd, 2008, 10:55 PM   #1573
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Milton Twp: Wind Turbines Development

Deleted due to Toledo Blade's request.
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Old March 3rd, 2008, 10:56 PM   #1574
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Findlay: A. Schulman Expansion Development

A. Schulman plans $18M Findlay expansion
Posted on Toledo Business Journal website
March 2008 Edition


A. Schulman, Inc. plans to construct a 77,000 square foot plastics manufacturing building as well as purchase machinery and equipment to increase operating capacity at its Findlay site. The company facility will be utilized for compounding products used in the additive and film markets. Ohio was in competition with Missouri, Indiana, and Mexico for this $18 million project, which is expected to create 33 positions within the first three years of the project's initial operations.

According to the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD), A. Schulman has been awarded a 40% credit for a five-year term to assist the expansion. The value of the tax credit is estimated at $76,698 over the term, and the company would be required to maintain operations at the project site for 10 years.

A. Schulman’s new CEO, Joseph Gingo, joined A. Schulman late last year, succeeding the company’s former chairman, president, and CEO, Terry L. Haines. Gingo most recently served as executive vice president, quality systems and chief technical officer for The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company. He has also been an A. Schulman board member since 2000.

In a statement regarding his appointment, Gingo commented, “The company is poised for growth, with the restructuring of our North American operations and the launch of InvisionĆ.”

Invision is a compound and resin finish for automobiles (assist handles, console lids, armrests), trucks, recreational vehicles (handles, grips), and appliances (soft touch surfaces).

In early January, Gingo also revealed a 100-day plan designed to improve the company’s profitability and to drive future earnings growth. According to the company, Gingo’s plan covers six main areas of transportation across the firm:

• More efficient and effective utilization of A. Schulman's North American manufacturing facilities, including potential restructuring;

• Enhanced focus on value-added products to drive profitable growth in the polybatch and engineered compounds segments;

• Re-assessment of A. Schulman's North American automotive business to emphasize profitable areas;

• Suspension of further capital expenditures on InvisionĆ until the marketing strategy has been refined to ensure accelerated market adoption of the new multi-layered sheet product;

• Identification of additional efficiencies in the sales and administrative structure of European operations; and

• Ensuring that the proper leadership team is in place to execute upon A. Schulman's strategy.

Gingo stated, “While the special committee of the board reviews external strategic alternatives, we will focus on ensuring that we have in place the best strategy and infrastructure to take the company forward, positioning A. Schulman for success under all circumstances.”

In the March 2007 issue of Toledo Business Journal, Haines discussed the company’s growth plans, including $53 million plans for new construction, machinery, and equipment at Findlay’s Tall Timbers Industrial Park.

At the time, Haines explained that the company was moving away from “commodity” products and toward custom formulated, engineered plastic compounds in an effort to broaden its customer base.

A. Schulman is an international supplier of plastic compounds and resins, which are used as raw materials in a variety of markets. The company’s principal product lines consist of proprietary and custom-formulated engineered plastic compounds, color concentrates, and additives designed to improve the appearance and performance of plastics in a number of specialized applications.

The company has technology centers in North America and Europe. Headquartered in Akron, Ohio, A. Schulman employs approximately 2,500 employees and has 13 manufacturing facilities in North America, Europe, Mexico, and the Asia-Pacific region.
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Old March 3rd, 2008, 10:58 PM   #1575
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Sandusky: Akro-Mils Development Update

Erie County wins petri business
Posted on Toledo Business Journal website
March 2008 Edition


Akro-Mils, Inc. – located in Sandusky and a manufacturing segment of Myers Industries, Inc. – has proposed a plan to invest more than $1.5 million in new machinery and equipment and on-site infrastructure to support the relocation of a Petri dish business from Brampton, Ontario, Canada to the Sandusky facility.

According to Mark Litten, executive director of the Erie County Economic Development Corporation, eight production lines that manufacture Petri dishes will be relocated to Sandusky from Ontario.

“It’s going to create new jobs and it’s a very nice investment in our community by Akro-Mils,” he stated.

The new injection molding lines are designed to complement Akro-Mils’ existing lines and manufacturing processes, and the company plans to conduct both manufacturing and distribution functions at its existing Sandusky facility. Ohio was in competition with South Carolina and Kentucky for the project, which is expected to create 30 jobs and retain 78 positions within the first three years of the project’s initial operations.

Myers Industries is closing three recently acquired facilities in Brampton, Ontario; Lugoff, South Carolina; and Dawson Springs, Kentucky with the company’s other facilities bidding to make the products that were previously produced at these facilities. The Petri dish making operations are proposed to move from Ontario to the Sandusky plant.

“Akro-Mils has facilities around North America. They actually put this out to bid to all of their facilities,” Litten explained. “So, the Sandusky plant management submitted their proposal to bring this business here. And we worked very closely with plant personnel in trying to put together an incentive package to enhance their bid to their corporate board of directors.”

To accommodate the project, Akro-Mils plans to create a semi-clean room operation and install eight additional injection-molding machines. It also plans to maintain its current employment level of 78 full-time equivalent employees and create a minimum of 30 new full-time equivalent job positions.

The Ohio Department of Development (ODOD) has approved a 30% tax credit for a five-year term for the expansion. The value of the tax credit is estimated at $24,070 over the term, and the company would be required to maintain operations at the project site for 10 years.

Additionally, the City of Sandusky has approved a $100,000 Revolving Loan Fund low interest loan to the company. Litten explained that the loan principal could be forgiven if the company reaches its job creation goals for the project.

In 2006, Akro-Mils completed a 165,000 square foot addition to its existing 144,000 square foot facility at Sandusky’s Bayside Business Park. A small part of the building expansion has been used for an existing injection molding operation with the balance of the new facility being used for warehousing and shipping.

Akro-Mils is headquartered in Akron and is one of four manufacturing segments that sells more than 20,000 products under 14 brands to a range of customers and markets. The company conducts its business activities in four segments, including three manufacturing segments and one distribution segment. The manufacturing segments consist of North American material handling, automotive and custom, and lawn and garden. The company designs, produces, and markets both plastic and metal storage, organization, transport, and material handling products for use in industrial, commercial, and consumer markets.

Since 1947, Akro-Mils has provided plastic and metal products for storage and organization for businesses and consumers. Its industrial / commercial products can be used to store nuts and bolts or medical supplies, as Akro-Mils’ bins, carts, and material handling products can be found throughout the commercial and healthcare industries.

Myers Industries is an international manufacturer of plastic and rubber products for industrial, agricultural, automotive, commercial, and consumer markets. The company is also a wholesale distributor of tools, equipment, and supplies for the tire, wheel, and undervehicle service industry. Myers encompasses 25 manufacturing facilities in North America and Europe, 39 domestic and five international distribution branches, more than 20,000 products, and more than 5,000 employees.
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Old March 3rd, 2008, 10:59 PM   #1576
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Findlay: The RightThing Development Update

The RightThing, Inc. expands Findlay operation
Firm establishes global service center headquarters
Posted on Toledo Business Journal website
March 2008 Edition


The RightThing, Inc., an end-to-end provider of recruitment process outsourcing (RPO), broke ground in November to expand its headquarters in Findlay. According to the company, the project is designed to meet increasing client demand, year-on-year double-digit revenue growth, and recent global initiatives in the RPO industry.

The new structure, scheduled to open in June, will be located next to the company’s current facility with an enclosed walkway connecting the two spaces. The 35,000 square foot expansion will house up to 320 employees and feature eight conference rooms and a 200-seat auditorium; the auditorium will be a multi-purpose room used for clients as well as to hold events. Other features include a client display room, a large reception area, an open environment without individual workstations, an exposed ceiling, a raised floor, and a backup generator.

Alvada Construction is the general contractor and RCM Architects is the architect for the project. According to Whitney Killinger, public relations, The RightThing, the expansion has been designed to blend in with the existing facility.

With recent global partnerships covering Asia, Europe and South America, the expanded office will play a key role in establishing The RightThing’s global service center headquarters, according to the firm.

“We’re excited about the expansion. It’s evidence of our continued growth and commitment to delivering quality service to our clients,” Terry Terhark, president and CEO of The RightThing stated. “It’s also an investment in our employees. State of the art facilities create a productive environment, which tends to attract the best people.”

The RightThing moved into its current 43,000 square foot location in August 2006. The $3.6 million expansion included the acquisition of an existing building previously occupied by Microsoft Corporation until the end of 2004. According to The RightThing, its move to the new headquarters resulted in it committing to the addition of 114 jobs and retaining of 150 positions over 3 years. Additionally, as a result of the project, Hancock County committed to the improvement of County Road 99.

With exponential industry growth driving triple digit employee expansion annually, according to the company, the building is already at capacity. The RightThing’s development this past year has included the opening of the industry’s first standalone recruitment operations center in Philadelphia last June, which will also serve as The RightThing’s global recruiting headquarters; plans are also in progress for a second center to open in Los Angeles early this year.

Founded in 2003, The RightThing has experienced financial growth at a rate of 250% each year, according to the company. Employee growth has also been strong.

The RightThing is designed to assist organizations in accomplishing their hiring goals and objectives by streamlining hiring processes for large corporations through outsourcing. The company has worked in a range of industries and claims organizations such as Kellogg’s, Merck, Unisys, Cardinal Health, CVS, and US Steel as clients. It is an end-to-end recruitment process outsource provider and, through a customized execution, delivers design, administrative, and consulting services to businesses in such industries as pharmaceutical, financial, consumer, public utility, and transportation.
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Old March 4th, 2008, 06:00 PM   #1577
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The Problem with Toledo

Quote:
Originally Posted by 4silverrings View Post
Proposal: Developing a Main Downtown Toledo Gateway from I-75 Highway

Posted from my blog: www.nextsteptoledo.blogspot.com



My original goal was provide insight into improvements and renovations that could be done in the Toledo area. This is my first attempt at getting some of my ideas on paper and on screen. Your feedback is greatly appreciated!




Bonjour, this was too good not to share. I haven't posted on ToledoTalk in several years, but I remember the biggest problem I have with Toledo.

It's general pessimism coupled with the audacity to whine about it while sitting on your ass contributing 205 articles and 901 comments.

Quote:
I would imagine this should be low on the priority list unless it's a headstone and accompanying flowers for the future economic development of the city.

As everything I know about urban development can be traced to the Sim City, we need to rebuild after natural disasters like tornadoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis, which are allegories for artificial disasters like mortgage scams ,housing bubbles, unfair trade policies with protectionist nations, etc.

It might be better to address more functional needs then aesthetic wants.
Toledo obviously has individuals that think that solutions to economic problems and increases in business development are mutually exclusive.

I feel your role is different, where as you talk about ideas and current business development. Others prefer to complain about mortgage prices, ask what a house value really is, and want kites to power boats.

While probably buying groceries from Wal Mart and paying rent to a landlord who paid a huge mortgage for the apartment complex.

I don't agree. But then again, I'm not a communist.

Comments about Urban Active Fitness
Quote:
They seem to prey on the naive, insecure, and people who want to look like someone else.

I would like to check the place out. But I'd probably prefer running or biking in a more peaceful environment than a meat market with handiwipes.
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Downtown Toledo Master Plan, Improvement Ideas, Design Concepts, Renovations, News, and more...
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Old March 5th, 2008, 01:47 PM   #1578
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Southwyck Mall Redevelopment UPDATE

Deleted due to Toledo Blade's request.
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Last edited by Bonjourtoledo; May 27th, 2008 at 01:42 AM.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 11:14 PM   #1579
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Marina District/East Toledo Development Updates

River East to sell six buildings including landmark to satisfy debt
Article by John Szozda 3/5/2008
Posted on The Press Newspaper website


One of the biggest landlords in East Toledo is getting out of the property management business.

River East Economic Revitalization Corporation is selling some of the most well known buildings in East Toledo including the Weber Block, the 1888 landmark it helped save from the wrecking ball in the late 1980s.

The six buildings have a market value of $1.8 million. They include: The Jobst Building, the E & C Manufacturing Building and the Steger-Showel Building. The Friedman Block, which once housed J.C. Penny’s, recently sold for $225,000, according to Brad Peebles, executive director of River East.

The only building not for sale is the old O’Rourke Buick dealership building at 715 Front Street. River East invested $1.2 million to accommodate a tenant, B.E.C. labs, which at its zenith, employed more than 100. When the company lost a large client and downsized, it fell behind its rent. Today, the building is worth less than the mortgage, Peebles says.

Kent Myers, president of the board, wants River East to get back to its roots—economic development, not property management. That means stabilizing and redeveloping the Starr-Main business corridor, writing business plans for small businesses and facilitating industrial development.

Peebles agrees. He said, “It’s not been the mission of River East to be property managers. We’ve been ineffective…We need private investment, not more public investment.”

Peebles immediate goal is to pare down $1.5 million in debt including more than $50,000 in back taxes. He’s attempting to stay one step ahead of the creditors. Two recent lawsuits have been settled. The Colyer Family Limited Partnership won a judgment of $45,046 and has agreed to a monthly payment plan. And, Volunteer Energy Services, which sued to recoup $66,817 in unpaid gas bills, agreed to settle.

The sale of the buildings is crucial to survival. The federal government has reduced community development block grant money to the City of Toledo, which, in turn, has reduced funding to River East. Peebles said River East received $245,000 seven years ago and just $101,000 this fiscal year. Deeper cuts are expected this June for the 2008-2009 fiscal year.

So, how did the lead agency for economic development in East Toledo get in such dire straits?

In the 1990s, River East was the city’s most successful community development organization. So successful that in 1993 its director Don Monroe was named Ernst & Young’s national recipient of its Supporter of Entrepreneurship award. Its accomplishments included:

Redeveloping the Weber Block, which in 2003 housed seven business employing 50;

Creating a small business incubator in partnership with the University of Toledo;

Converting the Andrews Building into a multiple business center;

Developing The Docks restaurant and entertainment complex, which in 2000 employed more than 600 and generated some $1.3 million in payroll and sales taxes;

Acting as the lead agency to complete the first brown-field development in the state which resulted in $4.4 million in investment and the saving of 204 jobs.

But, the economy changed. Jobst left for North Carolina and River East bought the building in hopes of finding a tenant. Then, when E & C Manufacturing ran into financial trouble, River East bought that building and leased it back.

Peebles said River East charged low rents to keep and attract jobs. But, as businesses downsized or went under and couldn’t pay rent, River East was forced to liquidate assets.

Peebles is optimistic the 34-year-old organization will be around to see development of the $250 million Marina District project. He wants to dispel rumors he was brought in to close it down. “I told the board, I would agree to a six-month commitment to get the organization to become a viable entity again…I told the board I wouldn’t jeopardize my career with a floundering organization.”

Peebles is in the seventh month of his six month commitment. He can see the light. He has a pending offer for the Weber Block; a Detroit company purchased E & C Manufacturing and a five-year lease is in place and overhead was reduced when River East left the city-owned Andrews Building and its annual utility bill of more than $65,000.

The potential sale of the Weber Block concerns local historians Ron Mauter, president of the East Toledo Historical Society, and authors Larry Michaels and Jeff Eversman. The building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, is being sold without any deed restrictions, which means someone could buy it, raze it and put up a drug store.

“It’s the most important property they own as far as the future of East Toledo goes. They have a responsibility to that future,” says Michaels.

If we can get beyond these issues, the opportunities are abundant,” Peebles says. River East is working with a number of other business, civic, and government organizations to redevelop commercial and residential property in East Toledo’s central business district and the Garfield Neighborhood. The group, called Connecting the Pieces, was awarded a $200,000 grant to create a development plan.

Meanwhile, construction on a residential project featuring 160 row houses at the Marina District is expected to start in late 2008 or early 2009. The new city-owned marina and passenger terminal have been built.
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Old March 6th, 2008, 05:19 AM   #1580
Pilliod Njaim
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I haven't posted on ToledoTalk in several years, but I remember the biggest problem I have with Toledo.

It's general pessimism coupled with the audacity to whine about it while sitting on your ass contributing 205 articles and 901 comments.


Don't judge Toledo by ToledoTalk, since most people on there are not even Toledoans. Many are suburbanites or people who moved to the area who have a vendetta against they city. No single website accurately describes a city, whether it be Toledo or any other place else.
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