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Old August 26th, 2005, 11:03 PM   #41
Rational Plan
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Over the next ten years BAA is spending £3 billion on reconfiguring the existing terminals. All the terminals will be able to handle A380's as each terminal will be dominated by one of the airline alliances. Heathrow will be the only hub in the world where all three groups will have a significant presence. The terminals most likely to see significant change is terminal one and two. Options are bieng studied to reconfigure the piers into a more efficient toast rack pattern like T5. The landside areas might also be heavily rebuilt.

The first phase sees the main terminal and one satelite open in 2008 with the other in 2011. A third smaller satelite can be built as demand dictates.
When BA shifts from T4 and T1. a phased shuffling of airlines will follow as bits of their terminals are gradual refurbished and rebuilt. Some terminals will see passenger levels fall by 40% relieving the grimy refugee feel that Heathrow can get at the busiest weekends.

While Heathrow does have a lot of widebodies, a majority of aircraft carry less than 200 passengers. The new runway is supposed to be 2000 m (I think) about half the length of the exisiting runways. I'm not sure about just what the maximum size of the aircraft that could use the new runway would be. But it would be big enough for nearly all the aircraft that connect European cities.
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Old August 26th, 2005, 11:07 PM   #42
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a piece of masterwork
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Old August 27th, 2005, 04:55 AM   #43
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@Cheese M.: I think you may be talking about Marston or somethings like that. It's not a new airport, but it is southeast of London (quite a bit) in Kent. I think they are just trying to lure some traffic away from the closer London airports.

I've seen their ads in Air Cargo World where they have gone on about how great their facilities are.
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Old August 27th, 2005, 10:17 AM   #44
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Kent International Airport is also trying to get some traffic. EUJet, a LCC flies in there.
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Old August 27th, 2005, 10:19 AM   #45
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i thought EUjet collapsed
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Old August 27th, 2005, 04:50 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pricemazda
Also T5 went through the longest and most expensive planning inquiry in British history lasting 10 years even before it was approved let alone when it was initally announced and designed. Chances are the design with modifications was designed before Toronto.

BA will be moving ALL its Heathrow Operations into T5, with like you said its One World buddies like Qantas and Cathay Pacific.

But when talking about London airports you have to mention Gatwick and Stansted. Stansted is earmarked for expansion of an additional 2 runways which when realised will mean Stansted will handle more passengers than Heathrow. Heathrow is also earmarked for a possible 3 runway if BAA can sort out pollution issues, one assumes that a further terminal would serve that runway as well meaning a possible T6.

London truly is the worlds busiest air centre.
?? Do you think the Toronto terminal was designed, approved, and built
in a couple of years? No matter how much civic pride one has, it has
to be admitted that this terminal looks highly influenced by the Toronto
one.
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Old August 27th, 2005, 05:22 PM   #47
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I'm a fan of UK development. And I'm sure the terminal will be spectactular.

But the design definitely mimics Pearson, which by the way (contrary to an earlier slag posted here) is one of the most extraordinary new buildings in North America.
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Old August 27th, 2005, 06:23 PM   #48
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Yeah a lot of airport developments in the last few years have been a variation on a theme. Chep Lap Kok, Kansai, Terminal 5, Barajas, Stansted. All have a big outer envelope with a flowing roof that allows for greater natural ventilation. The upper level is inevitably the departures level, while arrivals is buried below. All we are really talking about her is the scale of the development and the shape of the roof.
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Old August 27th, 2005, 06:49 PM   #49
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You have to see terminal 5 to appreciate it, it looks huge and is a fantastic structure (at least from the M25).
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Old August 27th, 2005, 07:16 PM   #50
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i just went to london,, the airport is really old yea? but i havent seen the new ones.. would like to see it though,,
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Old August 27th, 2005, 07:46 PM   #51
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yeah right now heathrow airport sucks specially T1
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Old August 27th, 2005, 10:56 PM   #52
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Does anyone know what will be done with T4 when BA moves to T5?
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Old August 28th, 2005, 04:10 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rational Plan
terminals most likely to see significant change is terminal one and two. Options are bieng studied to reconfigure the piers into a more efficient toast rack pattern like T5. The landside areas might also be heavily rebuilt.
Is there any good info. about these future projects? Yeah cause if they could put in the "toast rack" pattern throughout the middle of Heathrow, it'd be one incredibly fabulous airport.

Mmmmmmmm toast.

:toast:
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Old August 28th, 2005, 04:11 AM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick in Atlanta
@Cheese M.: I think you may be talking about Marston or somethings like that. It's not a new airport, but it is southeast of London (quite a bit) in Kent. I think they are just trying to lure some traffic away from the closer London airports.

I've seen their ads in Air Cargo World where they have gone on about how great their facilities are.
Yeah I think you're right, thanks!
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Old August 28th, 2005, 04:26 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by london-b
You have to see terminal 5 to appreciate it, it looks huge and is a fantastic structure (at least from the M25).
Indeed it looks enormous from the M25. Going to be one huge structure when complete.
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Old August 28th, 2005, 07:19 AM   #56
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Hey, I hate to beat a dead horse but does anyone know what airlines get to use T4 when BA moves all ops to T5??? I'm asking because T4 is light years better than T1-T3.
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Old August 28th, 2005, 03:57 PM   #57
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I've copied some parts of the Masterplan below.

6 Heathrow development strategy
(within existing limits)
Heathrow Airport interim master plan | June 2005 26
6.11 Phase II of Terminal 5 is due to open in Spring
2011. This phase adds more stand capacity by virtue
of a second satellite located to the east of the first
satellite. Both will be connected to the core terminal
building via an underground transit system.
6.12 During this period (April 2008-2015) our main
challenges will be to:
● facilitate the growth in larger aircraft;
● enable the three airline alliances to provide
competitive services;
● ensure that independent airlines are able to grow
their businesses;
● complete Terminal 5 Phase II as cost effectively
as possible; and
● ensure there is effective connectivity across the
airport.
Development strategy
6.13 Our approach is to make the best use of the
airport facilities and satisfy alliance aspirations by
co-locating airline alliances in different parts of the
airport. The current plan is that:
● British Airways moves to Terminal 5 where the
capacity will be available to locate all of its
operations, alongside its alliance partner Qantas,
which will move from Terminal 4 to Terminal 5;
● Star Alliance airlines locate in Terminal 1 / Eastern
Apron in a phased manner;
● One World airlines locate in Terminal 3 / Western
Apron in a phased manner;
● Skyteam airlines locate in Terminal 4 as soon as
is practicable;
● Virgin Atlantic remain in Terminal 3; and
● Other independent or non-aligned airlines locate on
a ‘dovetail’ basis. Some of the airlines that are
planning to operate the A380 or other large aircraft
may be better suited to Terminal 4 where there is
likely to be more apron and terminal space.
6.14 We have secured agreement with three of the
main five alliances/airlines, namely British Airways,
Star alliance and Virgin Atlantic. Discussions with the
Oneworld and Skyteam alliances are progressing well.
In addition we have already had preliminary talks with
other non-aligned airlines at Heathrow.
6.15 These discussions, and the subsequent
memoranda of understanding MOUs, have focused
on how Heathrow can provide airlines with a first
class, competitive product in terms of improved
facilities, over a three year period from the opening of
Terminal 5 Phase I in March 2008 to the opening of
Terminal 5 Phase II in Spring 2011.
6 Heathrow development strategy (within existing limits)
Terminals Alliance airlines at Heathrow
(current members)
T1 and T2 Star Alliance
Air Canada
Air New Zealand
All Nippon Airways
Austrian Airlines
Asiana
bmi
LOT Polish Airlines
Lufthansa
SAS
Singapore Airlines
South African Airways
TAP Air Portugal
Thai International
United Airlines
Varig
T3 Oneworld (excl BA, Qantas)
Aer Lingus
American Airlines
Cathay Pacific
Finnair
Iberia
T4 Skyteam
Air France/KLM
Alitalia
CSA Czech
Korean Air
T5 Oneworld
British Airways
Qantas
27 Heathrow Airport interim master plan | June 2005
6.16 This strategy has the following main features:
● Eastern Apron remodelled to: accommodate more
larger aircraft, including the A380; improve
congestion associated with aircraft ground
movements; achieve physical solutions for the
segregation of passengers; and significantly
enhance the ambience of piers (through a
combination of the construction of new piers and
the rejuvenation of existing piers); ;
● Terminal 1 remodelled and refreshed to deliver a
competitive product for Star Alliance airlines;
● Western Apron developed to support more A380
and short haul flights;
● Terminal 3 refreshed to deliver a competitive
product for One World airlines and Virgin Atlantic;
● Southern Apron reconfigured to accommodate
more A380 operations; and
● Terminal 4 refreshed to deliver a competitive
product for Skyteam airlines.
6.17 The next section describes in more detail the
changes to airport facilities which could arise between
2005 and 2015 as a consequence of this development
strategy. Drawing 3 shows an illustrative on-airport
layout plan overlaid with land use categories and, as
such, represents the current version of a layout in line
with a potential ‘end game’ for Heathrow operating
within its existing limits. The character and pace of
growth in traffic will dictate the timing, phasing and
ultimate shape of this layout. Therefore Drawing 3
should not be construed to be either a final layout or a
2015 layout. As in Chapter 4 and for ease of
reference, the airport facilities have been grouped
under principal land use category headings.
Land use
Airfield
6.18 One of the most significant changes in the
airfield facilities will be the widening of the runways
and taxiways to accommodate the introduction of the
A380 and other new generation larger aircraft.
Heathrow is currently widening the southern runway
and associated taxiways ahead of the introduction
into commercial service of the A380. The northern
runway is already wide enough to handle the A380,
with the exception of its western end and this section
will be widened shortly. All taxiways will be widened
to accommodate the A380, with the exception of
those located to the north of the CTA. Widening of
the northern CTA taxiways would require the
demolition of Piers 4 and 4a and reconfiguration of
their associated stands. We consider this work would
only be justified if the overall taxiway congestion
levels reach unacceptable levels.
Aprons and Piers
6.19 A gradual trend towards increasing aircraft size
and associated taxiway widening will require the
progressive redevelopment of apron and pier facilities.
Although the number of stands will not increase
much above the 166 available in 2005, the area that
the stands will occupy in 2015 will be more than in
2005 (see Figure 6 below).
6.20 By 2015, there may be a requirement for
between 180-190 stands, depending on various
combinations of stand sizes. While Terminal 5 Phases I
and II would provide a total of 66 stands, these
additional stands are offset by the need for bigger
aircraft stands and wider taxiway infrastructure to
accommodate the growth in larger aircraft. Table 7
below sets out two ranges of demand for stand sizes
in 2015, based on our current forecasts and 90-95%
pier service levels for passengers.
6.21 Within these overall numbers there are two
categories of stands – pier served or contact stands,
which by definition are connected to a pier; and non
contact stands, which have no connection to a pier
and require the use of coaches to ferry passengers
to/from the terminals. Non contact stands play an
important part in the overall stand capacity
calculations because they allow aircraft with a layover
of a few hours to be parked away from pier served
or contact stands, releasing pier served stands for
other flights.

NB. The ranges shown above reflect the fact that
highest end is reached for say the A380 (JX) stand
size, then it is likely that there will be a lower
number for either the Jumbo or large stand sizes.
Eastern Apron
6.22 In order to deliver this development strategy,
the Eastern Apron will need to be substantially
remodelled after Terminal 5 opens. The piers will
need to be remodelled to segregate departing and
arriving passengers; and the stands, which are
currently sized predominantly for smaller aircraft, will
need to be enlarged. Based on the current terminal
occupancy strategy, there could be a potential need
in 2015 for around 15 additional stands that are
jumbo sized or larger on the Eastern Apron,
compared to 2005.
6.23 Various concepts have been developed for
the Eastern Apron over the last couple of years.
Of these, a north-south rectilinear concept
(known as the ‘Toast Rack’) is currently favoured by us
and the airlines. This is because its apron and pier
design mirrors that of Terminal 5 and enables more
efficient north-south taxiway routings for aircraft.
This concept is similar to one referred to by the
planning inspector in his Terminal 5 report.17 Drawing 3
shows this concept incorporated into an indicative ‘end
game’ layout for Heathrow within its existing limits.
It also shows other possible ‘end games’ for the
concept (Schemes B&C) each of which is driven largely
by differences in the pace of growth in aircraft sizes.
The ‘end game’ incorporated into Drawing 3
(Scheme A) envisages the Europier connector is
replaced by a bridge akin to the Pier 6 bridge at
Gatwick. We do not currently believe this bridge would
be required to support a development strategy for
Heathrow within existing limits.
Western Apron
6.24 Prior to Terminal 5 opening, the main focus
of work on the Western Apron will be the
redevelopment of Pier 6 to create four A380 (JX)
stands in time for the introduction of the A380 in
Spring 2006. Pier 7 needs to be truncated during that
time period to allow for A380 taxiway clearances.
6.25 Following the opening of Terminal 5, the 14
‘early release’ stands which are located on the
Terminal 5 site, but will be in operational use before
Terminal 5 opens, will no longer be available for use
by Terminal 3 airlines because the Terminal 5 airlines
will be using them. Our terminal occupancy strategy
seeks to solve this problem by relocating some of the
airlines, which contribute to the peak stand demand
in the Western Apron, to the Eastern and Southern
Aprons, in a phased manner after Terminal 5 opens.
6.26 Initial requirements for further large aircraft
stands, including A380, beyond those created
before Terminal 5 opens, could be accommodated
through some minor alterations to Pier 5.
6.27 Any further demand for large aircraft stands
after Terminal 5 opens is likely to require further
development of Pier 6, together with some
realignment and reconfiguration of Pier 7. A study is
underway to develop the Western Apron. At this
stage, only the Pier 5 and initial Pier 6
redevelopments are shown on Drawing 3.
Southern Apron
6.28 With a predominant mix of long haul stands,
the Southern Apron lends itself to the redevelopment
of stands for larger aircraft, particularly the A380.
The terminal occupancy strategy outlined above
assumes a number of non-aligned airlines which are
planning to operate the A380 are located on the
Southern Apron after Terminal 5 opens.
6.29 The forecasts associated with the terminal
occupancy strategy assume that the Southern Apron
would have a surplus of stand supply after Terminal
5 opens. This means that the predominantly short
haul operation of the current Heathrow airlines in
the Skyteam alliance can be accommodated on the
Southern Apron with only minor redevelopment.
Heathrow Airport interim master plan | June 2005 28
6 Heathrow development strategy (within existing limits)
Table 7: Forecast stand demand (2015)
Stand sizes Totals
Range A Range B
A380 (JX) 35 - 37
Jumbo 84 - 80
Large 31 - 42
Medium 37 - 30
Small -- --
17 In accepting that Heathrow Airport could reach a
passenger throughput that exceeds 90 mppa with
Terminal 5 (paragraph 8.6.3 of the Terminal 5
Main Report), the Terminal 5 Inspector recognised
that the provision of additional aircraft stands on
the Eastern Apron, which was not part of BAA’s
Terminal 5 public inquiry 80 mppa case,
represented a possible avenue for
accommodating such growth (paragraph 8.2.52 of
the Terminal 5 Main Report).
29 Heathrow Airport interim master plan | June 2005
6.30 For all apron areas, the growth in the numbers
of larger aircraft, with associated longer turnaround
times, will mean an appropriate supply of remote
stands will be essential to the achievement of pier
service levels.
Passenger terminals
6.31 The projected distribution of travellers across
the five terminals in 2008 and 2015, based on the
current terminal occupancy strategy, shows that the
terminals located in the Central Terminal Area (CTA)
and Terminal 4 are forecast to operate at throughput
levels which are below those for 2004 and 2007
(see Figure 7 below).

6.34 The rejuvenation of the current terminals
at Heathrow will be approached as follows:
Terminals 1 and 2
6.35 Given its age, and the fact that currently it
predominantly supports short haul flights, Terminal 1
will be remodelled and refreshed to offer the Star
Alliance airlines a premium product. Initially this will
require changes to the check-in area to
accommodate the self-service product; some
additional reclaim belts; and a significant
improvement to the terminal environment.
6.36 Options to cater for growth beyond 2011/12
are currently being studied. This will examine how
to maximise the utilisation of the terminal and
forecourt facilities on the eastern side of the CTA.
Pending the results of this study, the existing
curtilages of Terminals 1 and 2 and Queens Building
are shown on Drawing 3.
Terminal 3
6.37 Terminal 3 should have enough processing
capacity to support the Western Apron capacity
after Terminal 5 has opened. There are sufficient
numbers of check-in desks, although as in Terminal
1, some changes to the check-in hall to
accommodate self-service facilities will be required.
In addition, the forecourt for Terminal 3 will need
to be remodelled. The recently completed arrivals
reclaim project which delivered 3 additional reclaim
belts will provide enough capacity, up to the point
where additional reclaim capacity or belt lengths
may need to be provided in support of the above
mentioned Western Apron study.
Terminal 4
6.38 Terminal 4’s occupancy strategy, after Terminal
5 opens in 2008, can only be explained by an
understanding of the high levels of utilisation by BA.
BA’s current operation accounts for 82% of the total
numbers of passengers in Terminal 4, with around
40% of those passengers transferring aircraft at
Heathrow. These transfer passengers do not use the
landside check-in and reclaim facilities in Terminal 4
and do not require surface access services to get
to/from other locations in the UK.
6.39 The aim is to locate the Skyteam alliance and
some non-aligned airlines to Terminal 4. This is likely
to lead to lower utilisation rates of check-in desks
and reclaim belts. It is also likely that there would be
lower numbers of transfer passengers.


Heathrow Airport interim master plan | June 2005 30
6.40 Although the current numbers of check-in
desks should suffice for the terminal occupancy
strategy, the main issue is likely to be arrivals reclaim
capacity, most of which relates to the operation of
A380 aircraft in Terminal 4.
6.41 The rail connections at Terminal 4 will change
after the opening of Terminal 5. The plan is outlined
in Chapter 8, however we are currently assessing
options to provide a suitable rail service to Terminal
4 after Terminal 5 opens.
Connections
6.42 The overall number of transfer passengers is
forecast to increase moderately after the opening of
Terminal 5 (see Figure 8 below). The distribution of
the transfer passenger trips across the airport will
change because airlines will be located in different
terminals.
6.43 Alliance aspirations to maximise intra-terminal
transfers should allow some passengers and bags
to connect with flights in the same terminals.
However, there are still likely to be significant
volumes of inter-terminal transfer passengers
and bags. We need to assess how we can support
connections traffic in a manner which ensures that
Heathrow continues to be a successful international
‘network’ hub.
6.44 The key issue for transfer facilities after
Terminal 5 is open is the need for an effective
transfer baggage product between Terminal 5,
Terminal 3 and Terminal 1 to ensure that service
levels, as expressed by Minimum Connect Times
(MCTs), can be delivered. Discussions continue with
the airlines about the options available..

to release land value in the Central Terminal Area
(CTA), will be undertaken. This will review the
activities currently located in this area and consider
them against future passenger requirements. Given
the success of the hotel next to Terminal 4 and the
demand for a hotel at Terminal 5, the potential for
a hotel development in the CTA is being considered.
6.48 The amount of area required for airport
ancillary activities could increase compared to 2005.
Our strategy for 2015 is consistent with BAA’s case
at the Terminal 5 inquiry – namely, that any
additional requirement for airport related
development will be accommodated without
requiring additional non-airport land. We currently
estimate that for the airport to operate within its
existing limits, there is likely to be approximately 8
hectares of surplus on-airport land available for
future ancillary developments in 2015.
Surface transport
6.49 Terminal 5 creates the need for the westwards
extension of the Heathrow Express (HExEx) and the
Piccadilly Line (Piccex) from the Central Area. In
addition, Terminal 5 will be connected to the M25
motorway, via the M25 Terminal 5 Spur road.
6.50 As part of the CTA landside review, we are
planning to introduce a high frequency landside bus
service providing connections for passengers and
staff to travel quickly between the five terminals,
and other facilities such as remote car parks and car
rental areas. This high frequency bus service could be
a forerunner to possible new driverless transport
6 Heathrow development strategy (within existing limits)

Figure 8: Heathrow Airport - forecast transfer
passengers
31 Heathrow Airport interim master plan | June 2005
systems. One such system BAA is currently
investigating is the Personal Rapid Transit (PRT).
These systems are not anticipated to require a
material increase of the current landside road system.
6.51 We are assuming Heathrow will operate
within the 42,000 Terminal 5 car parking cap
condition for the airport within existing limits.
Currently, there are 34,719 on-airport spaces under
our control. In 2016, the 42,000 spaces Heathrow
is permitted is likely to be distributed according to
the plan contained in Appendix D, which has been
approved by the London Borough of Hillingdon.
Surface water



6.57 The development strategy outlined in this
section is based on a set of forecasts and associated
assumptions that may change. Outlined below are
some changes that have most significance or pose
most risk to the strategy, together with an overview
of BAA’s strategic response to them.
Larger aircraft
6.58 A pivotal factor for our traffic forecasts is
the future airline acquisition of A380s, 777-300s
(stretched version), A340-600s, Boeing’s 747
advanced and the new generation ‘250 seater’
aircraft (for which Boeing’s 787 and Airbus’s A350
are the leading candidates). To a greater or lesser
extent, most of these aircraft types have apron facility
requirements which differ from today’s facilities:
● A380s require increased taxiway clearances and
larger stands;
● 777-300s and A340-600s require larger stands
than standard jumbo aircraft; and
● some variants of the ‘250 seater’ aircraft
(e.g. the long haul 787) have a larger wingspan
than the aircraft that it will replace
(e.g. B767 & B757) and will require wider stands.
6.59 As well as the impact on stand facilities,
the number of new generation larger aircraft
(NGLA) that airlines ultimately operate will affect
future passenger growth rates at given levels
of aircraft movements.
6.60 We are looking to provide additional facilities
for larger aircraft in an incremental manner. Further
information and greater certainty surrounding future
airline acquisitions of larger aircraft will influence the
pace and scale of delivery.
Alliance composition
6.61 Changes to the future composition of airline
alliances might pose a risk to this approach.
We have sought to mitigate this risk by ensuring
generic apron and terminal facilities are prioritised
above bespoke developments.
‘Open Skies’ – EU/US bilateral negotiations
6.62 In principle, BAA supports the notion of an
‘Open Skies’ deal for the EU/US, where it promotes
and protects UK consumers’ interests. Assuming such
a positive outcome, we will look to facilitate, to the
extent we can, the outcomes of such an agreement.
6 Heathrow development strategy (within existing limits)
Heathrow Airport interim master plan | June 2005 32
6.63 In undertaking our initial analysis, we have
assumed that slots operated by smaller aircraft
would either be traded or transferred to the new
EU/US services. This is particularly important for
Heathrow operating within its existing limits
(ie. the 480,000 cap is in place).
6.64 A full study will be undertaken to assess
what facilities and what strategies will be required
to support this scenario should it occur before
Terminal 5 opens.
6.65 Should an EU/US ‘Open Skies’ deal happen
after Terminal 5 opens, we would seek to use the
available capacity on the Southern Apron and in
Terminal 4. This is particularly pertinent because,
assuming the current alliance composition, it is likely
that the Skyteam alliance could gain proportionately
more flights under this deal, and airlines such as
Northwest, Continental and Delta could gain access
to Heathrow. Initial estimates suggest that in
addition to further development of the stands,
check-in and reclaim areas, particularly for the
Southern Apron and in Terminal 4, there may also
be a need to increase the capacity of the Heathrow
Connect service.
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Old August 28th, 2005, 08:25 PM   #58
Cheese Mmmmmmmmmmmm
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^ That's great stuff Rational Plan, could you post the link to the site you got this from? Thanks!
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Old August 28th, 2005, 08:47 PM   #59
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T5 reminds me of T5 O'Hare too.
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Old August 28th, 2005, 09:18 PM   #60
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Just go to BAA.CO.UK and look in the publications section. There are stacks of reports on transport strategy, masterplans, environmental reports for all the major London Aiports. They are all rather large though.
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