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Old August 25th, 2005, 11:30 PM   #1
pablonis
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Churches of Vilnius, part 2

churches of Vilnius, part 2

The Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

The Church and convent of the Sacred Heart of Jesus or the Visitandine Church together with the adjacent Missionaries' Church form an impressive complex on Išganytojas (Saviour) Hill, which is highly visible from various parts of the city. This church is an important late baroque style structure. Its interior is ornate but was badly destroyed during the Soviet occupation. After World War II, a prison was established there, which has been operating until now.



The Church of St. Raphael the Archangel

The Church of St. Raphael the Archangel and the Jesuit monastery stand on the banks of the Neris. This stylish two-tower late baroque structure was built in 1702 - 1730. In 1773, the church passed from Jesuits to the Piarists and the latter later sold it to the Russian authorities, which established an army barracks and warehouse in it. In 1860, the church was returned to the Catholics again. The interior of the building is interesting: the high altar contains a beautiful picture of the Archangel Raphael by S. Čechavičius (18th century) in addition to many other valuable pictures. The pews from the beginning of the 18th century in the central nave should also be mentioned.



The Orthodox Church of the Holy Mother of God

This Orthodox cathedral stands on the left bank of the Vilnelė. It is thought that Julijona, the wife of Algirdas and the mother of Jogaila, established this church in the 14th century and was buried in it. In 1511 - 1522, Duke K. Ostrogskis rebuilt the almost-ruined old church. The new church was rebuilt in the gothic Byzantine style. In 1609, the church was passed to the control of the Uniates. Finally in 1808, the neglected church was sold to Vilnius University. An anatomy and veterinary museum as well as auditoriums and a library were established in the church. During 1864 - 1868 at the initiative of Muravyov, the cathedral was rebuilt, acquired its present appearance, and again became an Orthodox church. The present fasades and domes imitate Georgian medieval architecture. The interior was recreated during the reconstruction. It is harmonious and has an especially ornate five-tiered iconostas studded with pictures.







St. Parasceve's Orthodox Church

St. Parasceve's (Piatnickaya) Church, according to legend, was built in 1345 on the site of a temple to the pagan god, Ragutis. After it burned down, a brick Orthodox church was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century. In 1611, the church along with the adjacent buildings and almshouse were passed to the Uniates. However, they were bad landlords, not paying the appropriate attention to their property. Only after the occupation of Vilnius in 1655 was the restoration of the building possible.

In 1705 and 1708, Tsar Peter I visited the repaired church and bestowed a special honour on it by making a present of the flags taken from the conquered Swedes. It is also said that Peter I baptised Hannibal, the great grandfather of Alexander Pushkin, here.

During 1794 - 1864, the church stood closed and almost in ruins. After the uprising in 1863 when russification measures were undertaken, an Orthodox church, based on the design of the architect, N. Tchiagin, and fairly larger than its neo-Byzantine predecessor, arose on this site in 1864.



[img]http://photos.reitsma.cx/Lithuania/Vilnius/Churches/StParaskevaChurch/DSC01359.jpg[/im

The Church of St. Peter and St. Paul

A wooden church, destroyed during the 1655 - 1661 War with Moscow, stood in this location since the christening of Lithuania. Hetman M. K. Pacas, in memory of the liberation from Russians, built the brick Church of St. Peter and Paul during 1667 - 1676. The building seems quite severe and restrained from outside. It is in the form of a Latin cross with the dome and two short towers. The fasade is two tiered with columns and a balcony. The church has a unique old picture portraying the plague in Vilnius (1710). This canvas was restored at the beginning of the 19th century.

The fence surrounding the churchyard and four chapels were built in the second half of the 17th century. The square in front of the church is named Jonas Paulius II Square, in memory of the Pope's visit to Vilnius.

The most valuable asset is the church's interior, in which white predominates. White stucco mouldings: sculptures, relief work, and panels cover all the walls of the church as well as the vault, the dome, and the chapels. The human figures and faces are reckoned at approximately 2000 pieces. The human figures are grouped into separate scenes where parts of the New Testament, the lives of the saints and Lithuanian history are portrayed. The sculptured interior décor has undergone almost no changes since the beginning of its creation and has survived until the present day.













the Desecrated Virgin Mary's Church and Franciscan monastery

15th century





they always find smth like this during rebovations in oldtown


St. Theresa's Church and the Discalced Carmelite Cloister

One of the most perfect early baroque buildings of Vilnius is the graceful and tall St. Theresa's Church. It was built during 1633 - 1650 at the initiative of Deputy Chancellor Steponas Pacas and at his expense.

The main fasade is without towers and divided into two tiers. The second tier is fairly shorter than the first and ends in a steep pediment. The building consists of high and wide central nave and two narrow and low side naves with chapels. In the interior space, which is of reserved proportions, the abundant, even fantastic décor, overflowing with a play of images, is astonishing: columns, plaster decorations, and statues of the saints adorn all the altars. A fresco from the second half of the 18th century was restored in 1927 - 1929. Scenes from the life of St. Theresa are portrayed on the vaults of the central nave while emblems have been painted on the vaults of the side chapels. The pulpit, confessionals, and pews are in the rococo style. The buildings of the cloister are in early baroque style, restrained and modest; arches separate the convivial courtyards.

The Discalced Carmelites of Vilnius brewed beer which was famous throughout the city and made candles as well. The cloister supported lay medical students and took care of the elderly and orphans











The Church of the Ascension and the Missionaries' Monastery

On Išganytojas (Saviour) Hill beyond the former city wall near the Subačius Gate, in 1695 the erections of a church and monastery for the Missionaries were begun at the initiative of T. Pliateris and at his expense. Construction was completed in 1753.

The church belongs to the most delicate and graceful late baroque buildings in Vilnius while its two high towers and vestibule are in rococo style. With its light and proportional towers, sleek corners decorated with the decorative vases, lattices, and openwork crosses, it stands out clearly from the city panorama. The Missionaries' Monastery, built during 1640 - 1650, is located near the church. The Vilnius Diocesan Seminary, which was famous for its library, operated there during 1773 - 1844. It is thought that it was the largest library among all those of Vilnius's monasteries. Beginning in 1803, a parochial school operated there. In later times, the monastery's purpose changed many times. At present, a hospital is operating there.



St. George's church

15th century









The Church of the Discovery of the Holy Cross

The Kalvarijos chapels form the Stations of the Cross, which were created in thanksgiving to God for the liberation of the country from the Russians. The founder of the Stations was Bishop Jurgis Belazaras. Work began in 1664. The Church of the Discovery of the Holy Cross (or Kalvarijos Church) and 35 wooden chapels for the Stations of the Cross (Kalvarijos) were built. These are the second oldest Lithuanian Stations of the Cross according to their founding dates, and in the past were the most famous. Pilgrims and processions of the believers visited them.

After the wooden chapels burned down, in the 18th century, 19 brick chapels were built in this location. Later 31 chapels were blown up in 1963 at the order of the Soviet authorities. But the people persistently used to mark and take care of the chapel sites and the tradition of visiting them was not interrupted. At present, the Vilnius Stations of the Cross are being restored and, in 2000, seven chapels were consecrated.

The church is in the rococo style with two beautiful towers. The monastery's mansard roof is of interest. At present, the building reflects the late baroque style: the central nave is decorated with 18th century frescoes and the sacristy is decorated with 18th century relief sculptures. The rococo style pulpit and font are especially worthy of attention.





St. Nicolas's Orthodox Church

St. Nicolas's Orthodox Church is in the gothic-Byzantine style. It was built in 1514 by the Grand Hetman of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Konstantinas Ostrogiškis.

During 1609 - 1827, the church belonged to the Uniates, and in 1827; the Orthodox priests took it over. During fires in the 18th century, the old gothic church burned down and in 1845 was restored in the late baroque style. In executing a russification program, in 1865 the church was reworked in the Russian Byzantine style at the direction of Muravyov. Nevertheless, the vaults, the fasade, and the entire interior retain many gothic style elements



part 3 tomorrow
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Old August 25th, 2005, 11:41 PM   #2
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Great churches again
The Virgin Mary's Church and Franciscan monastery really needed a restoration.
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Old August 25th, 2005, 11:50 PM   #3
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I was... I saw...

beautiful Churches! beautiful City !

City with beautiful hostory
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Old August 26th, 2005, 11:17 PM   #4
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Nice photos. The church of St Peter and Paul is gorgeous
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Old August 27th, 2005, 12:32 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chukchi
Nice photos. The church of St Peter and Paul is gorgeous
yes, some are nice, but they are not mine (forgot to mention while creating thread, pictures of Holy Cross Discovery church are by Vaidas and others are from various places on internet)
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Old August 29th, 2005, 02:53 AM   #6
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Why didi you errase my honest opinions?
It is your mentality,as a Lithuanian,or lack of knowledge?
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Old August 29th, 2005, 02:56 AM   #7
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Half of the names in this thread written in Lithuanian way,people.And those people weren't Lithuanians.Conclusions:beautiful churches,but incompetent and insuficient information about it.Shame.
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Old August 29th, 2005, 03:18 AM   #8
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Not incompetent but done for a reason, notice how they kept Russian or German names unchanged while lithuanized Polish names. They are just affraid to say that 90% of these churches were built by Poles and by Polish catholics hence the need to fabricate names that never appeared in history.

Of course keep in mind that the lithuanian government (supposedly democratic) to this very day forbids Polish people (who are citizens of Lithuania) to spell their names correctly, not to mention engages in pathetic attempts at falsifying history. What are they affraid of ? Don't they know that forbidding people their basic right will sooner or later backfire on them ? Don't they know that falsy history is like a house of cards and bound to collapse sooner or later ?

It's quite funny that Pushkin didn't become Pushkinas while John Paul II became Jonas Paulius, Pac becomes Pacas while Muryavyov doesn't become Muryavyovas, Cechowicz becomes Cechavicius etc.

All of a sudden hethen and pagan Lithuania is full of Piarists, Carmelites, Jesuits etc. Maybe they came from Mars.

Very beautiful POLISH churches and RUSSIAN temples.
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Old August 29th, 2005, 03:24 AM   #9
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^the only one who came from Mars is you. You really need to see the doctor, to check your mental health
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Old August 29th, 2005, 03:27 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacek
Not incompetent but done for a reason, notice how they kept Russian or German names unchanged while lithuanized Polish names. They are just affraid to say that 90% of these churches were built by Poles and by Polish catholics hence the need to fabricate names that never appeared in history.

Of course keep in mind that the lithuanian government (supposedly democratic) to this very day forbids Polish people (who are citizens of Lithuania) to spell their names correctly, not to mention engages in pathetic attempts at falsifying history. What are they affraid of ? Don't they know that forbidding people their basic right will sooner or later backfire on them ? Don't they know that falsy history is like a house of cards and bound to collapse sooner or later ?

It's quite funny that Pushkin didn't become Pushkinas while John Paul II became Jonas Paulius, Pac becomes Pacas while Muryavyov doesn't become Muryavyovas, Cechowicz becomes Cechavicius etc.

All of a sudden hethen and pagan Lithuania is full of Piarists, Carmelites, Jesuits etc. Maybe they came from Mars.

Very beautiful POLISH churches and RUSSIAN temples.
lol is this what worries you most in life?
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Old August 29th, 2005, 10:30 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomasz z Wilna
Why didi you errase my honest opinions?
It is your mentality,as a Lithuanian,or lack of knowledge?
Seems liek mentality of Wilno Polacks never change, in contrary of your nation people in Poland (with exceptions!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacek
Not incompetent but done for a reason, notice how they kept Russian or German names unchanged while lithuanized Polish names. They are just affraid to say that 90% of these churches were built by Poles and by Polish catholics hence the need to fabricate names that never appeared in history.
It's Lithuanian grammar that requires lithuanizing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacek
Of course keep in mind that the lithuanian government (supposedly democratic) to this very day forbids Polish people (who are citizens of Lithuania) to spell their names correctly, not to mention engages in pathetic attempts at falsifying history. What are they affraid of ? Don't they know that forbidding people their basic right will sooner or later backfire on them ? Don't they know that falsy history is like a house of cards and bound to collapse sooner or later ?
Nobody forbids anything, except in official documents the names are transcribed to Lithuanian-friendly alphabeth, so those who work with data could be able to read. What if Chinese also demand writing their names in Chinese alphabeth? I really doubt your current homecountry Canada writes Polish surnames in their alphabeth, nor does USA that has 10 mio Poles living inside it.

Quote:
It's quite funny that Pushkin didn't become Pushkinas while John Paul II became Jonas Paulius, Pac becomes Pacas while Muryavyov doesn't become Muryavyovas, Cechowicz becomes Cechavicius etc.
We say Puškinas, Muravjovas, Čechavičius and etc., as I mentioned, all the names in Lithuanian texts are lithuanized for an easier read. I also think pablonis' way of writing doesn't reflect the official policy of Lithuania

Quote:
All of a sudden hethen and pagan Lithuania is full of Piarists, Carmelites, Jesuits etc. Maybe they came from Mars.
Thank you for noticing it. Paganism in Lithuania was it's own strong culture that we are proud of. Christianizing was good for international relationships, but the Christian culture was stranger in Lithuanians' mentality and that's why traces of Pagansims is still met in Lithuanians' minds Something unique, that's can't be met, say, in Poland


Quote:
Very beautiful POLISH churches and RUSSIAN temples.
I Think you are really sad that most landmarks of Vilnius are built or projected by Lithuanians or Italians
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Old August 29th, 2005, 11:12 AM   #12
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Jacek at his best.
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Old August 29th, 2005, 01:12 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacek
Not incompetent but done for a reason, notice how they kept Russian or German names unchanged while lithuanized Polish names. They are just affraid to say that 90% of these churches were built by Poles and by Polish catholics hence the need to fabricate names that never appeared in history.

Of course keep in mind that the lithuanian government (supposedly democratic) to this very day forbids Polish people (who are citizens of Lithuania) to spell their names correctly, not to mention engages in pathetic attempts at falsifying history. What are they affraid of ? Don't they know that forbidding people their basic right will sooner or later backfire on them ? Don't they know that falsy history is like a house of cards and bound to collapse sooner or later ?

It's quite funny that Pushkin didn't become Pushkinas while John Paul II became Jonas Paulius, Pac becomes Pacas while Muryavyov doesn't become Muryavyovas, Cechowicz becomes Cechavicius etc.

All of a sudden hethen and pagan Lithuania is full of Piarists, Carmelites, Jesuits etc. Maybe they came from Mars.

Very beautiful POLISH churches and RUSSIAN temples.
Most of these churches were built by Italians you prick.

And why do you feel it's necessary to ruin every single thread about Vilnius with your "we built this" crap? You didn't build anything, you're merely a little silly boy from Byalystok who can't get laid.
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Old August 29th, 2005, 05:03 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacek
Very beautiful POLISH churches and RUSSIAN temples.


Quote:
Originally Posted by blimey
You didn't build anything, you're merely a little silly boy from Byalystok who can't get laid.
well said
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Old August 29th, 2005, 08:02 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacek
Not incompetent but done for a reason, notice how they kept Russian or German names unchanged while lithuanized Polish names. They are just affraid to say that 90% of these churches were built by Poles and by Polish catholics hence the need to fabricate names that never appeared in history.
Quote:
Of course keep in mind that the lithuanian government (supposedly democratic) to this very day forbids Polish people (who are citizens of Lithuania) to spell their names correctly, not to mention engages in pathetic attempts at falsifying history. What are they affraid of ? Don't they know that forbidding people their basic right will sooner or later backfire on them ? Don't they know that falsy history is like a house of cards and bound to collapse sooner or later ?
We will allow that in the nearest future, I believe. But will you allow correct Lithuanian names for Lithuanians in the current soils of Poland, that's your trouble to be.
We are not falsifying our history any more in that huge grade as earlier, things are getting better every year with it. Do you protest as eagerly when Lithuanian and Polish Comonwelth State (Rzeczposplita Obojga Narodow, sorry I can't post orignal Polish letters here) is called just Poland in the history books?

Quote:
It's quite funny that Pushkin didn't become Pushkinas while John Paul II became Jonas Paulius, Pac becomes Pacas while Muryavyov doesn't become Muryavyovas, Cechowicz becomes Cechavicius etc.
Pushkin become Puškinas, Muravyov becomes Muravjovas and Cechowicz becomes Čechavičius (that might change to Cechowicz'ius as is written in science books of historians) and why you don't mind Jan Pawel becoming John Paul or Giovanni Paulo, but cry about him becoming Jonas Paulius?
We need endings -is, -as, -ius for the normal usage of our language, just like you need -owi in Landsbergisowi.


Quote:
All of a sudden hethen and pagan Lithuania is full of Piarists, Carmelites, Jesuits etc. Maybe they came from Mars.
Hehe, Lithuania started to change from pagan into Christian from 1387 and that's how it changed. Most of Polish speaking people of Lithuania never lived on the territory of nowadays Poland, so don't you tell they were real Poles all together. As much as they were Poles, we enjoy them being, 'cause we take it as a normal part of the multicultural history of our country. (Pagan culture was OK too, but not much of it has left after ages of fighting against it by lovely Christians)

Quote:
Very beautiful POLISH churches and RUSSIAN temples.
Everything is LITHUANIAN here by now, RUSSIAN is in RUSSIA and POLISH is in POLAND.
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Old August 29th, 2005, 11:06 PM   #16
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Calm down, Jacek. Go to sleep and don't forget your medication.

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Old August 29th, 2005, 11:19 PM   #17
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I don't think we should give so much attention to Jacek and probably his other account "Tomasz z Wilna". I think that we don't have enough competence to help him, I say so because I think that there are no psychiatrists among us.
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Old August 30th, 2005, 06:07 AM   #18
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No,guys,Jacek is Jacek,and I am Tomasz z Wilna(In Lithuanian-Tomasas is Vilniaus).I was born and lived most of my life in Vilnius and I am considering myself as a part of it's culture(in exact meaning,by the character of my major),but...
You,guys,missing the point in a whole story and it's a pitty.
For Non Lithuanians and Poles only:

Lithuanian Duches and Polish Kingdom united both countries through some treatises,first in Kreve,later oficially in Lublin in 1569. It became United Commonwealth of Poland Kingdom and Lithuanian duchess. Polish (not necessarily the Pole)king was the ruler and parliament was divided into 2 Houses on each side. It have been resolved in 1795 due to occupation from Russians,Prussian Duches and Austria. Before 1569 none of Poles lived originally in Lithuania,that's true.But neither did Lithuanians in modern meaning of this nation. OldRussians,Jews,karaims,Guds(Belorassians),Ukrainians etc. lived on the territory of the country,that was from Baltic sea till Black sea.And,my Lithuanian opponents should agree with that,the fact that Lithuanian dukes-Gediminas,Mindaugas and his brothers,sons,wifes talk in OLD Russian language is very significant.There are letters berween them that proves it.So,what has in common Modern! Lithuania with those times? Many things,but not everything.And yes,its true,many of those ,,Lithuanians'' were polonizing themself throught centuries in the same manner like in Russia they like to speak Freanch or German to look cool on the court
But at the same time,a Lot of Poles came to live there(since it was the same country,wasn't it?). As an example is my family.They were dukes Lachowicz,herbu Lodz,who bought the land of modern Aukstadvaris(then Wysoki dwor),built there castle(destroid during II world war by Russians) and half of the family moved into Vilnius(at those times Vilna from the river Vilnele).I am not mentioning also here demographic situation of Vilnius in 1936 (made by German scientists,honeys,not by Poles:38% of population of Vilnius were Poles,51%-Jews(most of them kiled during II WW by Lithuanian squad ,,Ypatingas Burys''(major officer Norvaisa was hired by Vilnius gestapo) in Paneriai(then Ponary)(most of those Plexavicius ,,heroes'' were exacuted by Germans in the same place in 1944 by Germans(strategy-hiding evidence). And-only 4-6% were Lithuanians.

And once more I would like to mention,that whatever happened after,like ,,voluntire'' repatriations of Poles in 1946-1953 wrenet organize by Lithuanians but by Stalin and Soviet Lithuanian authorities.And-many Lithuanians were fighting against Germans and Russians and they were proving their patriotism in much different ways than Norvaisa and his men.

Finally,the real question: were many people(citates by Pablonis above) Lithuanians,or Poles, or Jews. or Karaims,or Russian orthodoxes?This is the question,dear Lithuanians.Because,in case of buildings, that's true-Italians builted it,designed it and etc etc. And now it's a part of Lithuanian Republic and i Respect that(it's for Jacek). Time to move on.
But there is a small problem:everybody has a right to have a real name(by athnicity,nationality and etc).Amd Lithuanian grammar has nothing in common with that.My name is Tomasz,not Tomas,Tomasas,Foma,Tom ,Thomas or whatever.The same is my last name.This is untouchable things.
So,lets start to respect those great people a bit,because these people brought this beauty and glory to this lovely city. I love Vilnius, am fine with Lithuanians,Russians,Ukrainians,Jews,Karaims,whomever....I like those threads that make people wonder why they never went to visit this amazing city.All I want is just some respect in national question:Pac,not Pacas(Polish);Radvilai,not Radziwillowie(Lithuanians);Plateriai,not Plater(Lithuanians);Czechowicz,not Cechavicius(Polish) etc etc etc...


I hope educated and swell-knowledged people will understand my point of view.

Od bylego hrabiego Lachowica,herbu lodzi,
Sekmes
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Old August 30th, 2005, 08:48 AM   #19
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Yes, Lithuanian rulers used to write each other in Ruthenian language which was like official written language in the duchy, but most of the historicians believe that they used to speak Lithuanian as well as they were Lithuanians. This situation was caused by decline to accept christianity, since most of nations got their script through it and Ruthenians were already baptized ages ago, so they already had the script. Another things, majority of Lithuanian duchy where Slavic people and Lithuanian lived roughly in the same territory as modern Lithuania plus some lands in modern Belarus, Latvia and Poland.

Also note that Vilnius used to have a settlement way before 1323 when it was officially mentioned and the archeologists found a lot of Baltic pagan stuff around the Gediminas castle and the Cathedral. The evidence prove that this place was a major worship site, so it is today with the main Cathedral of Lithuania. They also believe that this place used to be called Šventaragio slėnis [The holyhorn's valley].

Another thing, that it's thought that Slavic proland is in modern Poland and Ukraine and that Salvs has formed from the peripheric tribes of Baltic as the most archaic IDE Old Prussian language is like a bridge from Baltic to Slavic languages and tells about their former unity. This also proves that modern Belarus was inhabited with other people than Slavic and most probably it was Balt and might that later, by the Salvic expansion the locals mixed with newcomers.
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Old August 30th, 2005, 06:42 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomasz z Wilna

Lithuanian Duches and Polish Kingdom united both countries through some treatises,first in Kreve,later oficially in Lublin in 1569.
Tomasz, Kreva wasn't a treaty, it was a one-sided act by the grand duke. It didn't mean a union or something similar. It was a so-called privilege. For some reason Polish historians like to bring this up as a union treaty even though it was neither a treaty nor a union.
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