daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 24th, 2005, 12:12 AM   #41
The Mad Hatter!!
P.E.C.K CREW
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: miami
Posts: 2,994
Likes (Received): 631

i love the warsaw scraper but whats up with the facade.
__________________
"Architects are pretty much high-class whores. We can turn down projects the way they can turn down some clients, but we've both got to say yes to someone if we want to stay in business"Philip Johnson

Boycott the La forum-Worse forum in SSC
The Mad Hatter!! no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 24th, 2005, 12:32 AM   #42
elliot
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,193
Likes (Received): 32

The Warsaw Tower is being marketed to acrophobics.
elliot no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2005, 08:04 AM   #43
addisonwesley
Registered User
 
addisonwesley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 1,021
Likes (Received): 5

The base is somewhat worrying.
addisonwesley no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2005, 04:29 PM   #44
Taller, Better
Administrator
 
Taller, Better's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 70,992
Likes (Received): 12206

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonovision
I'm not sure I like the facade either. Especially on the base, I think it should be glass. (Maybe it is, but it looks like metal siding to me)
Probably titanium..
Taller, Better está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2005, 05:19 PM   #45
Travis007
Registered User
 
Travis007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 4,064
Likes (Received): 63

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taller, Better
Probably titanium..
LOL, since when do they use titanium in TO? Most likely, it'll either be stone, corrigated alluminum, or steel.
Travis007 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2005, 05:32 PM   #46
Taller, Better
Administrator
 
Taller, Better's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 70,992
Likes (Received): 12206

Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis007
LOL, since when do they use titanium in TO? Most likely, it'll either be stone, corrigated alluminum, or steel.
As far as I know it is going to be used on the facade of the AGO, but I could be wrong. What is the metal being used on the ROM?
Taller, Better está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2005, 08:00 PM   #47
valantino
The Greatest
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Valhaven
Posts: 4,515
Likes (Received): 4

^corrugated aluminum
__________________
Jeez, supertalls and faux deco.
valantino no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 27th, 2005, 06:42 AM   #48
Harkeb
BANNED
 
Harkeb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Cape Town, Seoul
Posts: 2,634
Likes (Received): 22

horrible!!
Harkeb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 27th, 2005, 06:50 AM   #49
Metroland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 282
Likes (Received): 2

I would not object to another re-design. This tower doesn't satisfy my tastes.
Metroland no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 27th, 2005, 11:21 AM   #50
Fragmentor
Funky London
 
Fragmentor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: North London
Posts: 1,782
Likes (Received): 1

havent seen anything like that before, very interesting...
Fragmentor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 27th, 2005, 03:55 PM   #51
elliot
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,193
Likes (Received): 32

"^corrugated aluminum"

What a tease. It is of course a special anodized aluminum being fabricated in Germany by the one of the finest cladding manufacturers in the world (Gehry's Disney Concert Hall etc.).

Hopefully they'll change their minds and use corrugated instead.
elliot no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 28th, 2005, 03:29 AM   #52
Islandre
Registered User
 
Islandre's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: SF, CA
Posts: 44
Likes (Received): 0

Now there goes Liebeskind's. This is more hideous than that bullet tower in London.
Islandre no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 28th, 2005, 02:53 PM   #53
rise_against
Olde Guard
 
rise_against's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Toronto - Seoul
Posts: 1,806
Likes (Received): 8

i love it world class!!!
__________________
"Any dictator would admire the uniformity and obedience of the U.S. media." - Noam Chomsky
rise_against no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2005, 11:08 PM   #54
Jedje
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Eindhoven
Posts: 102
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marco Polo
Sorry guys, Warsaw looks great. The Toronto tower sucks. It is one ugly monster tap.
true
Jedje no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2005, 11:32 PM   #55
Mauricio Canada
Mauricio Canada
 
Mauricio Canada's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 35
Likes (Received): 0

[FONT=Arial]Sep. 29, 2005. 07:49 AM (The Toronto Star)

Too tall an order for T.O.?


Daniel Libeskind is perplexed by the reaction to his towering design for the Hummingbird Centre


But battles over vision are nothing new for the architect behind the World Trade Center's rebirth

MARTIN KNELMAN

A few blocks from Ground Zero, Daniel Libeskind — the man who dreamed up the master plan for recreating the World Trade Center — rushes from room to room at the sprawling head office of Studio Daniel Libeskind. Colleagues, assistants and Nina Libeskind — his Toronto-born wife and chief lieutenant of his operation — come and go with urgent bulletins about projects in Milan, Denver, Switzerland.

But this morning he is concentrating on Toronto, perplexed by the negativity that greeted images of the startling new tower he proposes to build adjacent to the Hummingbird Centre, and suggesting that there have always been prominent people in Toronto who suffer from chronic small-mindedness.

"The 40th anniversary of Toronto's city hall is coming up," he remarks, smiling and eager to chat. "I was just reading an article about it, which reminded me of the angry reaction it received in the 1960s."

Libeskind was hugely impressed by it when he came to Toronto to court Nina, daughter of veteran NDP leader David Lewis and sister of Stephen Lewis.

"It's still one of the most beautiful buildings anywhere in the world," says Libeskind, "but I had forgotten how myopic Toronto was about it at the time, including people at the University of Toronto's school of architecture. `It doesn't fit in with our city,' they said."

Libeskind's shrug suggests that could be the way things are likely to go with his bold reinvention of the Hummingbird — which Toronto city council will be asked to approve tomorrow.

No wonder Libeskind is perplexed. Torontonians remained silent for years as the city was subjected to a plague of boring, ugly condo buildings going up everywhere. But now that one of the world's greatest architects has designed a truly dramatic, original and poetic condo tower, it is greeted with disdain.

By now Libeskind should be used to controversy and urban warfare. On his home turf over the past few years he battled fiercely with competing architects and developers and even the New York Times to protect his vision for a new World Trade Center — and emerged victorious.

"This is how it has always been," he said. "Cities have to change, but often it takes time before creative changes are absorbed, understood and appreciated. And I have noticed a disconnect between the mentality of the old Toronto and the new Toronto."

The old Toronto is represented by the naysayers who dislike anything innovative. But according to Libeskind, the new Toronto says, "We want something imaginative that celebrates our incredible city." And in this case he is confident the new Toronto will prevail.

Taking a chair in what people in his office call "the Hummingbird room" the renowned architect plants his feet, encased in pointy black loafers, under a huge table covered with paper cut-outs, images and site plans of the Toronto arts world's problem child and his scheme to reinvent it.

Gazing through the thick lenses of his trademark horn-rimmed glasses at the drafts and variations of the startling boot-like tower and podium base unveiled last week, Libeskind talks about why he accepted this challenge and how he worked his way through its difficulties.

Libeskind is offered new projects every day, and has to turn down most of them. Why did he take on the Hummingbird, which was facing an identity crisis as its two chief tenants, the Canadian Opera Company and the National Ballet of Canada, prepared to leave and move to the new Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts next year? There were reasons to think the final curtain would soon fall on the fan-shaped performance venue, designed by Peter Dickinson 45 years ago.

`Right now I would say the future of Toronto is unstoppable.'

Daniel Libeskind, architect

"This was not about plopping down another condo tower so developers could make money," says Libeskind. "I love Toronto. I lived there for a while, we were married there, and my son was born there. I feel an emotional connection to Toronto, and I care about it. Like New York, it has vibrancy and a cosmopolitan population, but it also has the excitement of being a brand-new city."

But for more than a decade, Libeskind waited for Toronto to awaken from its slumber. "I used to say that, one day, Toronto would realize you can't just sit back and do nothing. Now the moment I was waiting for has come. There is so much going on. There's a sense of momentum, and people are buzzing about a renaissance. Right now I would say the future of Toronto is unstoppable."

Today, Toronto strikes Libeskind as a place where everything is possible — and now it is in the midst of a building boom and a cultural explosion, with things going on everywhere you look, including Libeskind's own dramatic makeover of the Royal Ontario Museum.

"With the Hummingbird project, I was given the opportunity of improving a key site and a cultural landmark. It has a spectacular location. Front and Yonge is one of the most important corners of the whole city — where the financial district, the waterfront and the St. Lawrence neighbourhood come together.

"I saw this as a great opportunity to combine culture with the buzz of people living and interacting in the same place. This is a trend that is happening all over the world. Increasingly people want to live right in the midst of the cultural attractions they love. At the same time, I saw it as a chance to enliven the streetscape and help bring a great neighbourhood, St. Lawrence, back to life."

Libeskind considers his Hummingbird plan a triumph for many reasons. It creates a synergetic space that works in new ways, a hub and a magnet that will draw people to Front and Yonge 24 hours a day, seven days a week while fusing cultural, residential and commercial activity.

Its gardens atop the old arts centre promise to beautify the whole area.

While showcasing the original building's façade on Front and Scott Sts., Libeskind's plan vastly improves its appearance from the rear on the Esplanade, and gives new life to what had become a dead zone on Yonge St. south of Front.

And his tall, slender, swooping tower enhances and embraces Toronto's unique skyline, gesturing toward larger buildings near by.

As the discarded cut-out shapes in the Hummingbird room attest, the task was complex and the plan evolved slowly.

In his highly readable 2004 autobiography, Breaking Ground: Adventures in Life and Architecture, Libeskind wrote: "There are designs of mine that may never be built ... But I never give up hope; I always believe my buildings will be built, and given time, they almost always are."

As for the Hummingbird, Libeskind says, beaming with pride: "If Peter Dickinson were alive today, I am confident he would not only approve of what we are doing, he would love it."[SIZE=3]
Mauricio Canada no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu