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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:13 AM   #301
xInfamuzPunjabix
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btw since u've mentioned about NRI's, dont want to sound fobby but it was NRI's dat brought malls, privatization to india.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:16 AM   #302
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Originally Posted by xInfamuzPunjabix
btw since u've mentioned about NRI's, dont want to sound fobby but it was NRi dat brought malls, privatization to india.
The same NRI's went to the USA as labourers at first and now 1 out of 9 are Millionaires. Show's you an Indian's potential. Same can be replicated at home and we are seeing that. Infosys, Wipro, TCS, Tata, Mahindra Mahindra, Videocon, Maruti, Bajaj, HAL, Raxbury, Nano Technology, Bio Technology.

80% of foreign students in Graduate studies in the USA are from India. Does that show you India's potential and return investment potentials? If all Indians moved out of the USA at once, the USA's standing as one of the richest nations will fall by 10% and yet they only constitute 1.6% of the population.

Please don't use the word Fobby, i consider it demeaning and insulting.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:27 AM   #303
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"50% of the World's GDP by 2010 will be inbetween India and China"

"80% of foreign students in Graduate studies in the USA are from India"

lol,man,do you have some basic ideas about these things?do you know the current GDP of US,china and india,respectively?2010 is only 5 years away.
80% is absolutely wrong,chinese mainland student's number is close to indian students,let alone korea and chinese taiwan.stop bragging,man.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:37 AM   #304
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Originally Posted by sravan2569
The same NRI's went to the USA as labourers at first and now 1 out of 9 are Millionaires. Show's you an Indian's potential. Same can be replicated at home and we are seeing that. Infosys, Wipro, TCS, Tata, Mahindra Mahindra, Videocon, Maruti, Bajaj, HAL, Raxbury, Nano Technology, Bio Technology.

80% of foreign students in Graduate studies in the USA are from India. Does that show you India's potential and return investment potentials? If all Indians moved out of the USA at once, the USA's standing as one of the richest nations will fall by 10% and yet they only constitute 1.6% of the population.

Please don't use the word Fobby, i consider it demeaning and insulting.
wtf, so if thats an indians potential why didnt they become millionaires in india huh?
and the question is, why would those NRI's want to go back to india?

without USA's help NRI's would be nothing but average people in India

everytime India has problems, India looks upto NRI's for help,

what do we get?

Bollywood movies make about 25% of the money through overseas responses.

The worlds 3rd richest man, Mr. Laxmi mittal; would he be the third richest man in the world if he stayed in India?
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:40 AM   #305
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huaxia-zhonghua
"50% of the World's GDP by 2010 will be inbetween India and China"

"80% of foreign students in Graduate studies in the USA are from India"

lol,man,do you have some basic ideas about these things?do you know the current GDP of US,china and india,respectively?2010 is only 5 years away.
80% is absolutely wrong,chinese mainland student's number is close to indian students,let alone korea and chinese taiwan.stop bragging,man.
In the year 2002, of the entire total 1,063,732 immigrants to USA from all the countries, as many as 66,864 were from India. According to the US census, the overall growth rate for Indians from 1990 to 2000 was 105.87 per cent. The average growth rate for the whole of USA was only 7.6 per cent.

Indians comprise 16.4 per cent of the Asian-American community. They are the third largest in the Asian American population. In 2000, of all the foreign born population in USA, Indians were 1.007 million. Their percentage was 3.5 per cent. From 2000 onwards the growth rate and the per cent rate of Indians amongst all the immigrants has increased by over 100 times.

Between 1990 and 2000, the Indian population in the US grew 113% - 10 times the national average of 13%. Source: US Census Bureau

Today, Asian Indians are the second largest Asian group (2,226,585) in the US, behind only the Chinese (2,762,524). Source: 2003 American Community Survey

Indians own 50% of all economy lodges and 35% of all hotels in the US, which have a combined market value of almost $40 billion. Source: Little India Magazine

One in every nine Indians in the US is a millionaire, comprising 10% of US millionaires. Source: 2003 Merrill Lynch SA Market Study

A University of California, Berkeley, study reported that one-third of the engineers in Silicon Valley are of Indian descent, while 7% of valley hi-tech firms are led by Indian CEOs. Source: Silicon India Readership Survey

Indians along with other Asians, have the highest educational qualifications of all ethnic groups in the US. Almost 67% of all Indians have a bachelor’s or high degree (compared to 28% nationally). Almost 40% of all Indians have a master’s, doctorate or other professional degree, which is five times the national average. Source: The Indian American Centre for Political Awareness.


The American Association of the Physicians of Indian Origin boasts a membership of 35,000. In 2000, Fortune magazine estimated the wealth generated by Indian Silicon Valley entrepreneurs at around $250 billion.

In Silicon Valley, California, a significant percentage of entrepreneurs are of South Asian origin, specifically Indo American. The names that crop up among successful Indo Americans in the technology field are Vinod Khosla, Kim Singh, Kanwal Rekhi among others.

Americans of Indian descent have, in the past, been targets of racism by members of all ethnic groups--though it has dissipated substantially. Some of it is overt, perhaps the worst example being the New Jersey dot busters - groups of thugs who sought ethnic Indians and mugged them or attacked their property in the late 80s and early 90s, the "dot" referring to the bindi worn traditionally by Hindu women on their forehead. These attacks were racially motivated, and alienated the Indian population from the American mainstream. This lack of assimilation has created many problems for both ethnic Indians as well as non Indians.

Middle East

* Saudi Arabia 1,400,000
* United Arab Emirates 1,200,000
* Kuwait 500,000
* Oman 350,000
* Qatar 175,000
* Bahrain 140,000
* Yemen 100,000
* Jordan 4,100

East Asia

* Hong Kong S.A.R. 35,000

South East Asia

* Malaysia 2,300,000
* Singapore 400,000
* Philippines 125,000

South America and the Caribbean

* Guyana 326,782
* Suriname 162,113
* Trinidad 473,735
* As well as nominal communities in Barbados, Belize, Jamaica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Martinique and Guadeloupe.

Africa

* South Africa 1,200,000
* Mauritius 800,000
* Reunion 250,000
* Kenya 70,000
* Uganda 60,000
* Tanzania 50,000
* Madagascar 30,000
* Mozambique 21,000
* Zambia 20,000
* Zimbabwe 20,000

Europe

* United Kingdom 1,500,000
* Netherlands 300,000
* France 70,000

North America

* United States 2,500,000
* Canada 713,330 (2001)

Oceania

* Fiji 350,000
* Australia 150,000
* New Zealand 70,000


That was 6 years ago.
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Last edited by sravan2569; August 16th, 2006 at 05:46 AM.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:47 AM   #306
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lol,dude,all you posted have nothing to do with what you said:" 80% international graduate students are from india".it just said 67% of india here got their college education.and the GDP of US 2005 is 12.49 trillion $,india is 0.78,china is 2.22,so just think about it how it would be in 2010 with only 5 years left.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:47 AM   #307
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xInfamuzPunjabix
wtf, so if thats an indians potential why didnt they become millionaires in india huh?
and the question is, why would those NRI's want to go back to india?

without USA's help NRI's would be nothing but average people in India

everytime India has problems, India looks upto NRI's for help,

what do we get?

Bollywood movies make about 25% of the money through overseas responses.

The worlds 3rd richest man, Mr. Laxmi mittal; would he be the third richest man in the world if he stayed in India?
Would American MNC's be so rich if they stayed in America? Use some common sense, we are in a globalized world. Live with it.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:50 AM   #308
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sravan2569
Would American MNC's be so rich if they stayed in America? Use some common sense, we are in a globalized world. Live with it.
haha look whose talking about common sense, okay lets try this once more in simple words, those NRI's wouldnt be millionaires in the first place if they didnt come to America do you get this? its simple english..

and why would a succesfull American Indian wanna leave the US?

Last edited by xInfamuzPunjabix; August 16th, 2006 at 05:56 AM.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:51 AM   #309
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Originally Posted by huaxia-zhonghua
lol,dude,all you posted have nothing to do with what you said:" 80% international graduate students are from india".it just said 67% of india here got their college education.and the GDP of US 2005 is 12.49 trillion $,india is 0.78,china is 2.22,so just think about it how it would be in 2010 with only 5 years left.
Sorry it's 18% :P .... 80% for south asia.





The number of Indian students attending colleges and universities in the USA reached record levels during the academic year 2001/2002, according to Open Doors 2002, a report published by the Institute of International Education.

For the first time, Indian students were the largest nationality studying in the USA, increasing their numbers by 22.3 per cent on the previous year and overtaking Chinese students - the previous leader - who increased their numbers by 5.5 per cent.

Rajesh Arya, President of the Council for American Education in India, said that more Indian students could now afford to study overseas. '[It is] very difficult to get admission to good Indian universities,' said Arya. 'Over the past two decades, the number of students have increased tremendously but the number of [places] in Indian universities has not increased.'

The majority of Indian students in the USA were studying at graduate level according to the report, with 74 per cent being graduate students, 21 per cent undergraduate students and four per cent on non-degree programmes.

Ravi Singh, from Global Reach in India, said that the most popular subjects for students were computers and engineering. 'The USA has always been the number-one destination for Indian students,' he said.

The report also showed an encouraging increase in the number of students from a range of different countries. Fears that the events of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent toughening up of visa regulations, would have a negative effect on international enrolments have yet to be fully realised during this academic year. Overall, international student numbers in the USA increased by 6.4 per cent during 2001/2002, with significant individual increases from China, Mexico, Pakistan and Colombia. However, as many of the international students taking up university places in September 2001 would have applied up to one year previously, statistics for 2002/2003 should show the true effects of the terrorist attacks on international applications.

'These numbers are encouraging,' said Patricia Harrison, Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs. 'International education has become of paramount importance to economic, political and social conditions in both developing and developed countries.'

The number of students from the Middle East studying in the USA increased by 4.6 per cent on the previous academic year. Individual decreases from the United Arab Emirates (-20.2 per cent), Oman (-11.3 per cent) and Iraq (-5.2 per cent) were largely masked by significant increases from Lebanon (21.4 per cent), Iran (20.2 per cent), Jordan (10.5 per cent) and Turkey (10.1 per cent).

That was in 2001/2002
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:54 AM   #310
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you mean 80% international graduate students at america are from south asia?
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:56 AM   #311
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Yale Forges New Ties in India during Levin’s Visit
January 2005

President Richard C. Levin met with India’s Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh, President Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam, Finance Minister P. Chidambaram, and other leaders in business, education, and government during a week–long visit to India, January 2–8.

The January trip was the first official visit by a Yale President to the country where the University’s namesake, Elihu Yale, lived and worked for nearly three decades. Yale served the British East India Company between 1670 and 1699, and administered Fort St. George in Madras (today’s Chennai, the capital of the state of Tamil Nadu) as its governor between 1687 and 1692. In 1718, Yale donated to the Collegiate School of Connecticut three bales of goods, 417 books, a portrait of King George I, and a set of royal arms. Madras cotton, silk, and other textiles from India were among the bales of goods, and their sale raised 562 English pounds for the construction of the University’s first building.


Levin led a delegation of Yale faculty and administrators to four cities: New Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai, and Mumbai. Members of the delegation included T. N. Srinivasan, the Samuel C. Park, Jr. Professor of Economics and Chair of the South Asian Studies Council at the Yale Center for International and Area Studies; Dr. Michael Merson, the Anna M. R. Lauder Professor of Public Health; Shyam Sunder, the James L. Frank Professor of Accounting, Economics and Finance in the Yale School of Management; Kathleen J. Sikkema, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Epidemiology and Public Health; Jane Levin, Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Directed Studies Program; Nalini Tarakeshwar, Associate Research Scientist in Epidemiology and Public Health; Philip Long, Director of Information Technology Services and the University’s Chief Information Officer; and Linda Koch Lorimer, Vice President and Secretary of the University

“It was an important moment for our visit to India,” said Levin. “India is rapidly emerging as a global economic and political power, and our students and faculty are increasingly interested in working and studying in the region. We wanted a clearer sense of the opportunities that are here for Yale to engage with Indian institutions.”

Apart from exploring possibilities for future academic initiatives and institutional partnerships, the trip also was intended to re–connect the University with Yale alumni and parents in India and to advance the University’s standing among important audiences in business, education, and government. Finally, three new programs were initiated that signaled Yale’s growing presence in India.

During three days in New Delhi, President Levin and the delegation held meetings with Prime Minister Dr. Singh, President Dr. Abdul Kalam, United States Ambassador to India David Mulford, members of the Indian parliament and Ministry of Education, and other senior officials of the Indian central government. President Levin expressed the University’s desire to strengthen its existing relationships with India and to build new ones as the University expands its international presence. Indian officials noted that while many American educational institutions have taken an interest in India, Yale was one of only a handful of institutions that possessed the resources and infrastructure to provide Indian students with need–blind admissions and generous financial aid for undergraduate and graduate study.

Official meetings were only part of the delegation’s program for New Delhi. On January 3, nearly 150 alumni and friends of Yale attended a luncheon reception hosted by the Yale Club of India at the India International Center, which was a followed by a panel on “Beyond 2020: India in the Global Economy,” featuring a conversation on India’s economic prospects with President Levin, Professor Srinivasan, and Rakesh Mohan ’71, the Secretary of Economic Affairs in the Government of India’s Ministry of Finance. The panel highlighted Yale’s renowned Economics Department where all three studied, with Levin and Srinivasan earning Ph.Ds (and have been long–time faculty) and Mohan receiving his undergraduate degree.

President Levin joined Vice Chancellor G. K. Chadha of Jawaharlal Nehru University to inaugurate the Fox International Fellowships at JNU and to deliver an address on “The Global University” to the faculty and students at JNU.

Vice President Lorimer and Philip Long led members of the delegation on a visit to the IBM Research Center and the Indian Institute of Technology in Delhi. Jane Levin hosted a breakfast meeting on undergraduate admissions at which many of Delhi’s leading private and public secondary schools were represented. President Levin and Vice President Lorimer hosted a similar meeting for higher education leaders.

Yale’s billion–dollar commitment to science, medicine, and technology, and its strengths in engineering and the bio–medical sciences, were the focus of the delegation’s visit to Bangalore. President Levin and members of the delegation visited the Indian Institute of Science and the Indian Institute of Information Technology—Bangalore to explore prospective areas of collaboration with IIS and IIIT–B faculty and students. The delegation also visited two of the companies—Infosys and Wipro Technologies—that have been central to India’s boom in information technology over the past decade. Narayana Murthy, Chairman and Chief Mentor of Infosys, gave the delegation a personal tour of Infosys’ headquarters in Bangalore; at Wipro, Azim Premji, Chairman and Managing Director, hosted a luncheon to introduce President Levin and the delegation to the academic and business communities in Bangalore.

After visiting Bangalore, Levin emphasized the role that science and technology would play in the University’s global aspirations. “The importance of scientific and medical discovery to the advancement of the world,” noted Levin, “makes attention to these subjects almost a prerequisite for building the best global universities for the future.” While in Bangalore, Philip Long conducted a comprehensive visit to IIIT–B and gave two lectures at the institute and in a lecture series to Bangalore’s IT community.

The delegation’s time in Chennai came only ten days after a tsumani struck the Indian Ocean region. At a ceremony laying the foundation stone for a new Yale–Great Lakes Institute of Management (GLIM) Center for Management Research, Vice President Lorimer offered the University’s sympathies and deep concerns over the tragic events of the previous week, but also indicated to be “greatly heartened to witness the resiliency and the courage of the people of the region.” Along with the creation of the Yale–GLIM Center for Management Research, President Levin cut the ribbon to dedicate the offices of Yale Public Health in Chennai.

The presidential trip concluded in Mumbai where the Reserve Bank of India hosted President Levin and gave him an opportunity to meet many of the leading industrialists in India such as Mukesh Ambani, Chairman and Managing Director of Reliance Industries Limited, India’s largest private sector company; and Anand Mahindra, Managing Director of Mahindra & Mahindra; Jamshyd Godrej, Managing Director of Godrej & Boyce; and others. Parallel meetings were held with educational leaders in Mumbai by Vice President Lorimer.

Invited by the Indian Institute of Banking and Finance, President Levin delivered the Sir Purshotamdas Thakurdas Memorial Lecture on “Patents in Global Perspective” to an audience of Yale alumni, parents, and friends, and leaders of the Indian banking community that included the governors of the Reserve Bank of India, State Bank of India, and other financial institutions. Drawing on Levin’s tenure as the co–chair of the National Research Council’s Committee on Intellectual Property Rights in the Knowledge–Based Economy, the lecture was timely because India had recently adopted a new patent regulatory regime that was required for compliance with the mandates of the World Trade Organization.

On the final day of the delegation’s visit, an op–ed titled “Learning from the Yale Example” written by S. Sadagoppan, the Director of IIIT Bangalore, appeared in the Financial Express newspaper. Sadagoppan concluded, “If we can transform even one [Indian] institution into a Yale–like university, we can declare that we have ‘profited’ from the visit by the Yale University president.”
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:57 AM   #312
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i dont know where you get your information from sravan, but it all sure is some funny shit
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Old August 16th, 2006, 05:58 AM   #313
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Originally Posted by xInfamuzPunjabix
i dont know where you get your information from sravan, but it all sure is some funny shit
INDIA STUDENTS

MIT-India Program students will work at Infosys, one of India's most advanced information technology firms; at Godrej, India's largest privately held company; at ICICI, India's largest bank; and in Jamshedpur, the "garden city" in Bihar run by Tata Iron and Steel (TISCO). They will also teach Internet, web, HTML, Java and graphics at the Bishop Cotton Boys' School in Bangalore, at church and municipal schools in Jamshedpur, and at the Kalmadi Shamrao School in Pune, Maharashtra, where last summer six MIT students taught Internet and web classes.

The long-term goal of the MIT-India Program is to educate a group of MIT students who are equipped to build new bridges between the world's two largest democracies.

"MIT has more than 1,000 alumni/ae who came from India to learn in the United States. We want to reverse the flow, sending our students to India to learn at first hand Indian business practices, culture, technologies and problems," said Kenneth Keniston, director of the MIT-India Program and the Andrew Mellon Professor of Human Development in the Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS). "Among these students will be the men and women who have the technical knowledge and the cultural understanding needed to expand collaboration between our two countries."

MIT students will work alongside Indian peers, many of whom are recent graduates of the Indian Institutes of Technology or of Management. Interns working for Indian firms will receive in-country salaries and housing; most students will be hosted by Indian families. The MIT-India Program will underwrite airfares and supplementary stipends.

The program is also developing on other fronts. The new South Asia Forum, led by Dr. Abha Sur, a lecturer in STS, has sponsored a dozen well-attended lectures on topics related to science, technology and development in that subcontinent. A 20-member faculty Council on MIT-India offers advice and monitoring to the program. An MIT-India web page and calendar of South Asian events is being developed. Committees of Friends of MIT-India are also being established in the United States and India to provide advice and support to the Program. Next year, Starr Foundation funds will permit adding a half-time assistant to help expand the internship program.

"India is the world's fifth-largest economy and the world's largest democracy. It has an ancient civilization, vast potentials and enormous problems. Its economy is opening, and it has withstood the shocks that have recently shaken southeast Asia. It is an increasingly important center of knowledge creation in science and technology. MIT has long and deep ties with India. The time is right to build on them to create an intellectually vital program of internships, exchanges and new partnerships," Professor Keniston said.

The India Program is supported by the host Indian firms, Indian alumni/ae and friends, the Mustard Seed Foundation and the Starr Foundation grant for Asia programs to MIT's International Science and Technology Initiative, and by the work of the veterans of last year's program in Pune, led by Vinay Pulim, a graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science.

REVERSE BRAIN DRAIN?
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Old August 16th, 2006, 06:02 AM   #314
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"This is IIT Bombay. Put Harvard, MIT and Princeton together, and you begin to get an idea of the status of this school in India." (Lesley Stahl, co-anchor on CBS 60 Minutes)

"And it's hard to think of anything like IIT anywhere in the world. It is a very unique institution." (Bill Gates, Microsoft)

"Per capita, IIT has produced more millionaires than any other undergraduate institution." (Salon Magazine)

"The process for selection is absolutely draconian." (McKinsey head Rajat Gupta quoted in Business Week article on IIT titled 'Whiz Kids.')

On CBS 60 minutes segment on IITs Vinod Khosla asserted that The IITs probably are the hardest school in the world to get into. Based on that progam, many in the Indian media screamed that IITs better than US institutes like MIT, Princeton and Harvard.

..A curriculum that may be the most rigorous in the world. (CBS 60 minutes) I studied in a department of about 45 fellow-students with median JEE rank of about 60! Later I took classes at UC Berkeley. Comparing my experiences I wonder what was the point of that much rigor at IIT.

By and large, IITians work in IT-related industries. Bill Gates claims that IIT is an incredible institution. IITians, no doubt, have made their mark in the software industry. What about other industries?

We all know them - Vinod Khosla, Victot Menezes, Rajat Gupta, Nandan Nilekani, Narayan Murty - all IITians who by their brilliance and hard work made it big in a meritocratic world.

Some of the smartest IITians end up working in Silicon Valley. A researcher at UC Berkeley estimated that fully 20 percent of start-ups in Silicon Valley were IITian-owned. Do IITians own Silicon Valley?

IITians - Masters of Silicon Valley?
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Old August 16th, 2006, 06:02 AM   #315
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*yawns* buddy we are here to talk to about the infrastructure, not how many indians attend american colleges every year
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Old August 16th, 2006, 06:03 AM   #316
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*yawns* buddy we are here to talk to about the infrastructure, not how many indians attend american colleges every year
Then don't question my knowledge :P simple as that.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 06:07 AM   #317
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i never did :-P did i?
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Old August 16th, 2006, 06:07 AM   #318
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haha look whose talking about common sense, okay lets try this once more in simple words, those NRI's wouldnt be millionaires in the first place if they didnt come to America do you get this? its simple english..

and why would a succesfull American Indian wanna leave the US?
India has the most number of billionaires after America. No other country is even close.

I'm gonna leave the USA after college. It's too stagnant & sterilized for me... Ever true Indian wants to go back to India... Any Indian who knows India can't resist going back. The culture is simply amazing.

As an Intern and Junior year at college I make 44k per annum. I already make more than the average GDP per capita of Americans, and yet I want to go back to India. I just broke your theory.
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Old August 16th, 2006, 06:11 AM   #319
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Originally Posted by sravan2569
India has the most number of billionaires after America. No other country is even close.

I'm gonna leave the USA after college. It's too stagnant & sterilized for me... Ever true Indian wants to go back to India... Any Indian who knows India can't resist going back. The culture is simply amazing.
WOAH WOAH WOAH buddy that is SOO not true

how the hell does india have the most billionaires after US?


look here: http://www.aneki.com/billionaires.html
India is not even in the top 10
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Old August 16th, 2006, 06:17 AM   #320
magestom
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Midwest highway and interstate stink. But now they are making them bigger and redoing them. THey look real nice now. ANd toll ways allow you to go at full speed.


I think India in 2017 to 2020.
This year is 50th anniversery of U.S Interstate highways!
CHina...I do not know how they do it. Such nice highways in just 10 years. WHOA!
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