daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 14th, 2008, 03:33 PM   #341
snow is red
Vicky Pollard lol
 
snow is red's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 5,078
Likes (Received): 119

Photo taken on April 11, 2008 shows the platform of Chongwenmen station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing. Beijing's No. 5 subway line, which runs through the heart of the city from north to south, opened from last October after nearly five years' construction. The 27.6-km line is installed with 23 stations and runs from Tiantongyuan North Station in northern Beijing's Changping district to Songjiazhuang Station in southern Fengtai district. Equipped with a wireless communication network, live broadcasts will be provided on televisions installed in each subway car and passengers will never lose the signal on their mobile phones. The subway cars are wider and taller than the ones operating on the older lines and are designed to reach speeds of 80 km per hour. Elevators designed to aid disabled people have been installed.





A child plays at the chairs on the platform of Dongsi station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing



A passenger makes a call on the platform of Chongwenmen station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing



Photo taken on April 11, 2008 shows the automatic analyzer on the platform of Dongdan station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing



Photo taken on April 11, 2008 shows the platform of Dongdan station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing



Photo taken on April 11, 2008 shows the blind sidewalk on the platform of Dengshikou station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing




A child walks on the platform of Dongsi station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line with the pattern of Chinese chess in Beijing





Photo taken on April 11, 2008 shows the entrance and the exit of Zhangzizhong station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing





Photo taken on April 11, 2008 shows the icons of the 13th Paralympic Games at the Beixinqiao station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing.




Passengers get off at the Lama Temple station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing







Foreign tourists walk down the stairs at the Lama Temple station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing






A foreign tourist walks down the stairs at the Lama Temple station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing




Two subway trains run on the Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing




A subway train runs on the Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing





A subway train runs pass a pedestrian overbridge near the Lishuiqiao station of the Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing





A subway train leaves the Beiyuanbeilu station of the Beijing's No. 5 subway line with the structure like "pod" in Beijing





A subway train arrives at the Datundonglu station of the Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing





Photo taken on April 12, 2008 shows the electric board at the East Gate of the Temple of Heaven station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing





Photo taken on April 12, 2008 shows the circular lamps at the East Gate of the Temple of Heaven station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing






A passenger passes by a directional sign at the East Gate of the Temple of Heaven station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing





Photo taken on April 12, 2008 shows the brailles signs at the Puhuangyu station of Beijing's No. 5 subway line in Beijing.
snow is red no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 28th, 2008, 02:55 PM   #342
Codfish
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 43
Likes (Received): 2

From China Daily:

Beijing Subway to bid farewell to paper tickets

http://english.people.com.cn/90001/9...2/6400543.html

Beijing conducted the last large-scale trial operation for the Subway Automatic Fare Collection System (AFC subway system) on April 27th, according to Beijing News.

The staff concerned revealed that the AFC subway system will be put into use on May 17. By then the 30-year-old paper tickets, to be replaced by AFC one-way e-tickets, will officially quit from the historical stage.

The Subway Automatic Fare Collection System were tested on Line 1, Line 2, Line 5, Line 10, Batong line, Line 10 (not yet opened), the Olympic Extension, and the capital airport line. More than 120 stations were involved.

During the test, each station measured about 3,000 electronic tickets and 200 IC cards on average.
Codfish no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2008, 03:33 PM   #343
anonymous_filipino
Registered User
 
anonymous_filipino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Quezon City
Posts: 2,778
Likes (Received): 591

That's really good news for Beijing! Does that mean that Ticketing Machines similar to Hong Kong's MTR, Guangzhou's Metro, and Singapore's MRT will be put up in all of the stations?
__________________
Putting clients' needs first before broker
PRC Real Estate Broker License No. 0021895
HLURB Certificate of Registration No. NCR-B-07/2015-03299
anonymous_filipino no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 15th, 2008, 08:42 AM   #344
VikramRao
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New York City
Posts: 71
Likes (Received): 0

When i was a kid in India I marveled at NYC's subway system. Now New Delhi has a cool system too. Im glad, China's metro's look so far ahead of NYC'S (and to a point Delhi's). One thing I noticed, the trains looked very small, like 3 or 4 cars, New Delhi's trains have almost 10 cars to one train. Still Very Very cool, Hopefully one day will travel to China and use these marvelous trains.
VikramRao no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2008, 02:01 PM   #345
Aurelien
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 11
Likes (Received): 0

Line 10 of Beijing subway will open very soon.

Anybody has news or photos of the stations ?
Aurelien no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2008, 07:12 PM   #346
BarbaricManchurian
来了就是深圳人
 
BarbaricManchurian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Worcester
Posts: 5,504
Likes (Received): 6892

It opens July 5.

Pics:







































BarbaricManchurian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2008, 12:49 PM   #347
zergcerebrates
Registered User
 
zergcerebrates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Guam,Los Angeles
Posts: 2,287
Likes (Received): 62

Quote:
Originally Posted by VikramRao View Post
When i was a kid in India I marveled at NYC's subway system. Now New Delhi has a cool system too. Im glad, China's metro's look so far ahead of NYC'S (and to a point Delhi's). One thing I noticed, the trains looked very small, like 3 or 4 cars, New Delhi's trains have almost 10 cars to one train. Still Very Very cool, Hopefully one day will travel to China and use these marvelous trains.
Well different lines have different trains and lengths.
zergcerebrates no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 18th, 2008, 10:20 AM   #348
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18156

China's newest train has a B.C. feel
17 June 2008
The Globe and Mail

BEIJING -- When high-level Chinese delegations go to Vancouver, they often ask for a special visit to the SkyTrain. More than 100 Chinese delegations have inspected Vancouver's elevated train system in recent years.

Yesterday, the reason became clear. Beijing unveiled its latest train system – and it's a dead ringer for the SkyTrain.

The new elevated train will allow passengers from Beijing's airport to reach the heart of the Chinese capital in less than 20 minutes, travelling at speeds of up to 110 kilometres an hour.

The fully automated driverless transit system is based on Canadian technology pioneered on the SkyTrain in Vancouver. Its train cars, manufactured by Bombardier Inc. under a $68-million contract, are powered by linear induction motors built by a British Columbia company.

The Canadian suppliers took an inaugural test drive on the elevated train to Beijing's airport yesterday. “If I closed my eyes, I'd think I was in Vancouver,” said Paul Bayston, president of Wismer & Rawlings Electric Ltd., the Okanagan-based company that provided the motors for SkyTrain and the new Beijing airport link.

“The technology for the propulsion systems was pioneered in the Vancouver system,” Mr. Bayston said. “It's the same technology.”

The 28-kilometre elevated train, billed as an Olympic project, is expected to go into full swing before the Beijing Olympics begin Aug. 8. It's seen as an ideal showcase for Bombardier and its B.C. supplier.

Mr. Bayston believes the Beijing project will pave the way for a breakthrough in the Chinese transit market. “This is pretty exciting,” he said. “It's very high-profile. This is the first use of this technology in China. I think now we're going to be looking at significant growth in China for this technology.”

The booming southern city of Guangzhou has already decided to use the same Canadian technology for a subway extension project. It has chosen a consortium led by Bombardier as the preferred bidder, although negotiations are not yet under way.

“There are various bids out right now in China for systems using this technology, and I think we'll be successful,” Mr. Bayston said.

“We have active bids in three cities right now, and there are more on the way. I'm very optimistic. With what it can do in steep grades and tight corners, this technology is what is needed in these busy, growing cities in Asia.”

Bombardier's president of China operations, Jianwei Zhang, confirmed that SkyTrain was a huge influence on the new Beijing train. “Vancouver's SkyTrain is very famous in China and has become one of the most popular attractions for Chinese visitors to Vancouver,” he said.

The SkyTrain technology, known as Advanced Rapid Transit (ART), was first used in the Scarborough extension of Toronto's subway system. It has also gone into operation in Detroit and New York's John F. Kennedy airport, although Vancouver remains its biggest user.

The Beijing airport link is the second major application of the ART technology in Asia, following a similar system in Kuala Lumpur. Its third sale in Asia is in South Korea.

Mr. Bayston said his company has sold more than 1,200 of its linear induction motors for more than 600 ART trains around the world. It has 35 to 40 full-time employees manufacturing the motors at its plant in Okanagan Falls, near Penticton.

The Canadians were amazed that Beijing had completed its airport train project in just two years. “That's world-leading speed,” said Stephen Hall, a senior Bombardier manager.

Mr. Zhang acknowledged that Bombardier had endured “more stress” as a result of the rush to finish the airport train project before the Beijing Olympics. “Even for China, this is a very tight schedule.”

Kevin Falcon, B.C.'s Minister of Transportation, rode the airport train yesterday and said he was impressed. “This is a technology that has served British Columbia very well for over 20 years, and I think it will serve Beijing and the Chinese very well in the decades to come,” he said.

“I see nothing but good coming out of this. It's important that we celebrate it, because I think in Canada, frankly, we're much too shy about celebrating our successes. This clearly is a big success. We need to do more in Asia, and I think this is a good step in the right direction.”
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 19th, 2008, 04:28 AM   #349
deasine
=)
 
deasine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 2,452
Likes (Received): 57

Unfortunately, we didn't choose SkyTrain technology for our airport.

I love the interiors of the Beijing Airport Express. Sure it's a little monotone in terms of colour, it's extremely nice and clean and looks very bright. There are TV screens too =)

To those thinking 90 km/hr is slow, SkyTrain can reach up a max speed of 110 km/hr (or was it 100), but there are so many stations on our SkyTrain line, it can only reach 90 km/hr as the top operational speed.

Back to the Airport Express, I heard China is extremely interested in building a few other metros using Linear Motor Technology, similar to this like and SkyTrain.
deasine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 05:28 AM   #350
ode of bund
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Shanghai-Edmonton, Places where ETBs are molested.
Posts: 228
Likes (Received): 70

Flooded Beijing Subway

Beijing Chongwenmen (Gate of Civil Uphold) subway station after a torrential rain. The Olympic is so desperately close now, and the city infrasture is still so vulneralble to the most common call of the nature.


http://bbs.52bus.com/attachment.php?...18&nothumb=yes
ode of bund no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 06:50 AM   #351
urbanfan89
Registered User
 
urbanfan89's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,502
Likes (Received): 67

Wow, I hope it isn't due to shoddy construction.
urbanfan89 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 12:10 PM   #352
Codfish
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 43
Likes (Received): 2

Yeah, that was bad. They had to shut down a whole stretch of Line 5 for quite a few hours. I wish the system were more waterproof...

That said, though, that was a particularly bad rainstorm, in a city for which (contrary to what o.p. said) that isn't actually very common. We're on the edge of the Mongolian steppe here, folks. It rains a good amount during the summer, but not all that much. It's common knowledge here that Beijing isn't good at dealing with rain - my neighbors like to tell stories of rainstorms when the water level in the streets came up to their knees or higher. Yes, the sewer system needs a bit of work, and that extends to the subway; but fortunately, it's not a problem we face all that often.

A more important issue to discuss with regard to Beijing: does anybody have any clue when the $#^@% Line 10, Line 8, and the Airport Express are supposed to open?! The original date was the end of June... then the beginning of July... then mid-July... and now, all they're saying is "before the Olympics." I read online it might open this Monday (the 15th), and there are some signs this is true: on a ride on Line 13 today, all the maps of the system had been taken down, as if they're about to put up the new versions with the new lines. But that's hardly conclusive evidence.

Place yer bets, folks!
Codfish no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 12:46 PM   #353
Letniczka
Registered User
 
Letniczka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Noordersteed
Posts: 523

Who wonders when almost every Chinese city pays more attention to new higher and higher skyscapers than to own infrastructure. High buildings gain city's prestige, subways are invisible, so who really cares about their design or quality. First european metro systems are already about 100 years old, and they are still clean and reliable, till today, but I'm very curious to know the condition of Beijing's metro in the year 2050.
Letniczka no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 12:49 PM   #354
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,998
Likes (Received): 6422

actually Beijing is building the worlds biggest metro, to be 560 km by 2015. Tha Shanghai one will overtake London and be 500km by 2010, whilst in Guangzhou-Shenzhen theyre building the worlds largest by 2018, 2000km. All the Chinese cities are extending theyre metros from Wuhan to Nanjing to Dalain.
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 01:12 PM   #355
The Auckland Kid
Registered User
 
The Auckland Kid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Auckland
Posts: 32
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by the spliff fairy View Post
actually Beijing is building the worlds biggest metro, to be 560 km by 2015. Tha Shanghai one will overtake London and be 500km by 2010, whilst in Guangzhou-Shenzhen theyre building the worlds largest by 2018, 2000km. All the Chinese cities are extending theyre metros from Wuhan to Nanjing to Dalain.
Well not yet!!! And the bigger the metro the more problems, also the more people there are the more of the problem! U cant compare the next 100 years to the last 100 years. To many differences! I think metro in highly populated cities have to always looking out for minor problems, as it becomes harder and harder to shut down and huge sections of infustracture with bigger population every year. And to make it worse, more people are using public transport, so harder to clean, fix. I think the chinese GOVT will be looking out for this, but i dnt think being a bigger metro nesseraly means it will last as long as the others. It all comes down to the people who use it, and the more people using it the worse it becomes if not properly and effecently maintained and treated properly.
The Auckland Kid no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 01:30 PM   #356
snow is red
Vicky Pollard lol
 
snow is red's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 5,078
Likes (Received): 119

Quote:
Originally Posted by Letniczka View Post
Who wonders when almost every Chinese city pays more attention to new higher and higher skyscapers than to own infrastructure. High buildings gain city's prestige, subways are invisible, so who really cares about their design or quality. First european metro systems are already about 100 years old, and they are still clean and reliable, till today, but I'm very curious to know the condition of Beijing's metro in the year 2050.
Reliable yes, and about clean, I am not sure. But are you saying all of this without any maintenance works ? And those old stations always work fine without any problems since the first day they were opened ?
snow is red no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 01:38 PM   #357
snow is red
Vicky Pollard lol
 
snow is red's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 5,078
Likes (Received): 119

The thread starter gives a Chinese language source (which is quite against the rule of international forum)

Now this is a report in English.


Torrential rain knocks out new Beijing subway line for three hours


www.chinaview.cn 2008-07-05

BEIJING, July 4 (Xinhua) -- Beijing's new subway Line 5 was closed for three hours on Friday after heavy rains resulted in water leaking into one of the main stations.

The Beijing Meteorological Bureau issued a rainstorm warning at8 p.m., and predicted a precipitation of more than 50 millimeters with lightning and wind gusts for the ensuing six hours.

The massive downpours resulted in rain water flowing into the underground subway coordination office in the low-lying Chongwenmen Station, a transit station for Line 2.

The subway company cutting electricity to the line for safety reasons, and the operation between the southern end of Songjiazhuang to the Lama Temple Station was suspended.

Sand bags and cotton quilts were piled up at the entrances where the water was coming into the station, and normal operation resumed at 11 p.m. after the water was stopped.

Line 5 was opened to the public in October last year and runs for 27 kilometers north-south across the city.

Operation of the other lines of the Beijing Subway were not affected.

The torrential rain also caused traffic jams in the city. Monitors at the municipal traffic administration showed lines of vehicles at some sections of the second and third ring roads in downtown Beijing even as late as at 10:35 p.m. on Friday.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20...nt_8492631.htm
snow is red no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 08:37 PM   #358
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,889
Likes (Received): 18156

Cities don't always plan for extreme weather scenarios, and the notion of 'extreme' has been changing quite a lot in the past few years anyway. The same question on disaster readiness goes to New York when a big snowstorm happens, or plenty of European cities when heat waves strike and air conditioning is not common.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 10:11 PM   #359
UD2
A very cool person
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,294
Likes (Received): 31

Quote:
Originally Posted by Codfish View Post
Yeah, that was bad. They had to shut down a whole stretch of Line 5 for quite a few hours. I wish the system were more waterproof...

That said, though, that was a particularly bad rainstorm, in a city for which (contrary to what o.p. said) that isn't actually very common. We're on the edge of the Mongolian steppe here, folks. It rains a good amount during the summer, but not all that much. It's common knowledge here that Beijing isn't good at dealing with rain - my neighbors like to tell stories of rainstorms when the water level in the streets came up to their knees or higher. Yes, the sewer system needs a bit of work, and that extends to the subway; but fortunately, it's not a problem we face all that often.

A more important issue to discuss with regard to Beijing: does anybody have any clue when the $#^@% Line 10, Line 8, and the Airport Express are supposed to open?! The original date was the end of June... then the beginning of July... then mid-July... and now, all they're saying is "before the Olympics." I read online it might open this Monday (the 15th), and there are some signs this is true: on a ride on Line 13 today, all the maps of the system had been taken down, as if they're about to put up the new versions with the new lines. But that's hardly conclusive evidence.

Place yer bets, folks!

Line 10 opened late June. Airport line should open with in days, if it hasn't already been opened. Line 8 should open soon as well, but it will cut pretty close to the Olypmics from the looks of it.
__________________
"Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed" - President Eisenhower
UD2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2008, 10:20 PM   #360
UD2
A very cool person
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,294
Likes (Received): 31

Quote:
Originally Posted by Letniczka View Post
Who wonders when almost every Chinese city pays more attention to new higher and higher skyscapers than to own infrastructure. High buildings gain city's prestige, subways are invisible, so who really cares about their design or quality. First european metro systems are already about 100 years old, and they are still clean and reliable, till today, but I'm very curious to know the condition of Beijing's metro in the year 2050.
The Chinese cities are certainly pany alot of attention to their own infastructure than anyone else in the world. cities like Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shengzhen, Tianjin, Chongqing, Nanjing, Chengdu, changchun, Shenyang, Wuhan, Dalian, Xi'an, Shengyang, Fuoshan, Suzhou, Harbin all have one or more lines under construction. Many other cities have BRT systems running and are continueing to build them.

Beijing for example; Opened 4 new subway lines in the past 8 years, 2 more will open this year before the olympics, 2 more in the next two years and so on. This year, Beijing also upgraded Line 2's entire traffic control system to allow for 90 second gaps inbetween trains, which are some of the shorttest in the world. On top of that, the entire tunnel system for lines 1 and 2 have been upgraded to accomedate air conditions trains which came into service this year. Beijing is also investing heavily into BRT routes, one have already opened with success.

On top of public transit, there are routes, expressways, new train stations, airports, seaports, birdges, public works, educational institutions, hospitals .....Many other cities in China have the same success story that I have mentioned.

Now please spare us your ignorance and go do some research on your own.
__________________
"Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed" - President Eisenhower
UD2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
beijing, metro

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium