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Old June 2nd, 2010, 07:38 AM   #761
Ervin2
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Alright thanks.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 01:57 PM   #762
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anm View Post
Or possibly ride a bike.
Is it easy to take bicycles to Beijing Metro?
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 07:16 PM   #763
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Is it easy to take bicycles to Beijing Metro?
outright impossible during rush hour.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 07:18 PM   #764
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What rolling stock does the system use? I mean, what companies build their trains.
Chinese made platform/coaches and mainly Bombardier propulsion / train control.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 08:38 AM   #765
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If no one minds, I will share my transit pics from the Beijing area. Nothing special, but enjoy.

Start off in Dongcheng District, near Beixinqiao Station:

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Beixinqiao Station on Line 5. This was my home base.

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Outside Xizhimen Station, interchange for Line 2, Line 4, and Line 13.

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100 m walk or so takes us to the adjacent Beijing North Railway Station, terminus for intercity trains and Line S2 of the Beijing Suburban Railway.

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Unfortunately I got stuck in the queues at the ticket counters and missed the train I wanted—ended up losing an hour-and-a-half of my time that day. Anyways, this is my ticket to Badaling in first class. Not sure what the QR code at bottom right is for…

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Waiting for my train…

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Making my way down the ridiculously long platform…

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My train:

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“Great Wall” train.

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This is technically branded as a high-speed train (top speed 160 kph), and has a dining car. However, the train is really more of a suburban train primarily for tourists trying to get to the Badaling section of the Great Wall just outside Beijing. Even my first-class ticket was really cheap, only 17 RMB.

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First class. Unfortunately, I ended up with an aisle seat both times (I actually asked at the ticket counter to have a window seat, to no avail), so I wasn’t able to take many pictures from the window.

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Badaling Station:

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More to come…
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Old June 4th, 2010, 01:02 PM   #766
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"First class. Unfortunately, I ended up with an aisle seat both times (I actually asked at the ticket counter to have a window seat, to no avail), so I wasn’t able to take many pictures from the window."

Can't help it, especially if you buy few hours before departure. The only way is to get onto the platform as fast as you can and board the train early to grab the window seat next to you. Then just negotiate when the ticket holder arrives. The locals do that all the time.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 07:40 PM   #767
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Quote:
Originally Posted by y2koh View Post
The only way is to get onto the platform as fast as you can and board the train early to grab the window seat next to you. Then just negotiate when the ticket holder arrives. The locals do that all the time.
Actually, in a related story, I had someone pull this trick on me. I was quite dismayed when taking the Beijing-Tianjin HSR to find that someone had taken my seat while I was outside on the platform taking pictures of the train. Apparently, a young couple had bought tickets, but for some reason the computer assigned them seats not next to each other in first class even though the car was mostly empty. I ended up arguing with them in broken Mandarin that they had my seat and, thankfully, they moved. Of course, I only found out later when the train actually left Beijing South that there were plenty of empty seats and that the conductors never actually checked. In hindsight, I probably should have just moved to another seat the minute I saw them.
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Old June 5th, 2010, 07:09 AM   #768
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Part 2

After some time at the Great Wall, it’s time to head back to Beijing the same way we came, on Line S2. At Badaling Station, waiting on the platforms:

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They only open the doors to the platforms a few minutes before the train arrives, so there’s a steady stream of tourists and visitors heading down…

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Back at Beijing North Railway Station:

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After exiting through the “back door” of the station, I head to Xizhimen Station to hitch a ride on Subway Line 13. Line 2 and Line 4 are located underground, but Line 13 is located aboveground a bit of a walk away. The line forms a “fan” shape between Xizhimen and Dongzhimen through the northern parts of the city. As a terminal station, Line 13’s station at Xizhimen is designed with a single island platform between the two tracks (for boarding only) and two side platforms on the outside (for alighting only).

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Here, passengers on the platform crowd the doors waiting to board (and grab a seat), while passengers inside the train prepare to disembark from the other side.

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After a switch to Line 10 at Zhichunlu Station, I arrive at Beitucheng Station, to transfer to Line 8. The first phase of Line 8 spans only 4.5 km and four stations, and was built specifically for the Olympics.

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Little images of the Bird’s Nest and Water Cube show up on the maps above the platform doors.

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Inside a Line 8 train…

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Two stops later at Olympic Green Station…

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Exiting the station…

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Entrance-only faregates

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Digital advertising display

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After some time exploring the Olympics site, I end up at Olympic Sports Center Station…

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To be continued…
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Old June 5th, 2010, 04:55 PM   #769
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Don't they still have printed system maps that yu can get at the station? I was in Beijing last exactly 1 year ago and i could nowhere get a simple map://
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Old June 5th, 2010, 08:09 PM   #770
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That's some beautiful stuff right there.
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Old June 6th, 2010, 08:20 AM   #771
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Part 3

At Dongdan Station, where I transferred from Line 5 to Line 1, the workhorse of the network.

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After getting off at Tiananmen East and spending a couple hours in the Forbidden City, we cross this road to enter Jingshan Park. There were plenty of trolley buses of different sizes plying this street.

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After a quick hike through Jingshan Park, we take the road flanking the park’s west side, where there was more bus activity. Being a comparatively narrow road and with few alternative routes to get around the park, traffic was at a standstill.

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We take a leisurely stroll through the expansive Beihai Park, ending up on the west side along Wenjin Street, with plenty more trolley buses.

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After a 20-minute walk, we arrive at Xisi Station on Line 4.

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Unlike the other lines in the network, Line 4 was built (and is operated) by Beijing MTR Corporation. As a result, some of the station design elements bear uncanny resemblances to counterparts in Hong Kong.

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At Xidan, we transfer to a Line 1 train, taking us to Guomao Station.

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Walking towards Beijing’s central business district, we pass by a bus stop along the 3rd Ring Road.

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Further north, BRT Line 2 runs along Chaoyang Road, with a stop at the intersection with the 3rd Ring Road at Hujialou East Station.

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BRT bus pulls up to the platform. Unlike the BRT implementation in Guangzhou, the station design was more spartan and I didn’t see many buses using the exclusive ROW.

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Driving off…

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To be continued…
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Old June 6th, 2010, 08:42 AM   #772
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Is it easy to take bicycles to Beijing Metro?
When I said this, I did not mean bikes would be taken inside the metro.
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Old June 6th, 2010, 05:15 PM   #773
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Target 1050 km by 2020

"Almost 280 km of track are now being built, surpassing the tracks in operation. By 2015, the network is expected to reach 561 km, exceeding London's or New York's systems and by 2020, there will be 1,050 km of track."



Over the past few years, an army of workers has been spending 10-12 hours each day under the city, working feverishly to expand Beijing's subway system.

They endure poor air quality, high noise levels, isolation and extreme temperatures as they work to complete yet another kilometer of Beijing's ever-expanding subway network.

Though the subway has nine lines, 147 stations and 228 kilometers of track, the second-longest in China, it still can't cope with the public's demand.

Trains are overcrowded at almost any time of the day, and many areas are not served by the system.

To overcome this, an ambitious program began some years ago to add lines to the system. This was given a boost last year by a prodigious stimulus package, announced to fight the global financial crisis.

Almost 280 km of track are now being built, surpassing the tracks in operation. By 2015, the network is expected to reach 561 km, exceeding London's or New York's systems and by 2020, there will be 1,050 km of track.

Wang Junping is one of the many unsung workers of the project, decorating Yihezhuang station, in Huangcun town, Daxing district.

Wang, from Qianjiang, Hubei province, came to Beijing more than 10 years ago to work as a decorator. He has worked on Sanyuanqiao station on Line 10 and Majiapu station on Line 4. Yihezhuang is his third.

As the deadline for the completion of the station is the end of next month, Wang and his colleagues have been working more than 10 hours daily.

Like most construction workers, Wang can only return to his hometown once a year. His wife, a cleaner, works for the subway, too.

His daughter and son were brought up by grandparents and the only time the family gets together is Chinese New Year.

Yihezhuang is on the Daxing line, one of the 11 subway lines being built. This is part of the city's plan to encourage commuters to forgo private cars.

During tunnel boring on the Daxing line, there were more than 100 workers underground at the site. Now, about 70 are decorating the station.

Compared with Wang, Shi Pin is luckier because his wife and daughter live in Beijing, albeit two hours away. But he can be with them only one night every week.

Thanks to his job as safety manager, he is on call at all times and therefore sleeps onsite. A night with his family is a weekly treat.

His wife and daughter complain he doesn't spend enough time with them and he can feel a gulf developing between him and his daughter.

"I feel guilty because I failed to take my responsibility as a husband and father," Shi said. "I cannot even take her on an outing during the holidays".

He is also sad that between 2003 and 2008, he was unable to return to his hometown in Anqing, Anhui province, to see his parents.

Working underground is different from surface work. When building the tunnel, engineers and workers in tunnel-boring machines work 12 hours a day, enduring loud noises, high humidity and bad air quality.

"It's isolated from the outside world," said Wang Shunjiang, an engineer who specializes in tunnel boring. "There is no mobile phone connection and the only way to contact the people on the surface is by an internal phone",

Underground workers have to adapt to huge differences in temperatures, exceeding 30 C when boring, even if it's below 20 outside.

"After a few hours in the machine, my clothes will be completely wet," said Shi.

In winter, the gap between the surface and underground can be as high as 30-40 degrees.

But in summer, decorators may sometimes work in 5-7 degrees underground while the surface temperature might be 30. "If you walk in and out a few times, you can catch a cold easily," said Wang Junping.

At the Yihezhuang station camp on the surface, there are two basketball hoops, table tennis tables and areas to play cards. For the workers, with little time to return home, the site has to be where they can relax a bit.

In 10 years as a construction engineer, Shi has barely had any vacation. For him, life is one project after another.

"It is the characteristic of the profession. Since I chose it, I have to get over the difficulties. What else can I do?" he said.
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Old June 6th, 2010, 09:58 PM   #774
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pearl_river View Post
Target 1050 km by 2020

"Almost 280 km of track are now being built, surpassing the tracks in operation. By 2015, the network is expected to reach 561 km, exceeding London's or New York's systems and by 2020, there will be 1,050 km of track."


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Old June 7th, 2010, 03:26 PM   #775
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So in the end... the authorities still decide to build a bigger network in Beijing than in Shanghai, which has a larger, more dense population. I feel like its just a prestige project so that BJ would have those extra hundred kms over Shanghai... Does this 1050 km include S1, S2, etc. suburban rails too? And I even see suburban rail networks designed for Nanjing... why the **** isn't Shanghai getting one? It needs it more than any of these cities...
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Old June 8th, 2010, 06:59 AM   #776
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It's not like Shanghai will stop expanding its metro systems after World Expo. Believe me, it's hard to say which city will have a bigger metro system. Besides, they're not exactly in competition with each other; even with over 1,000 km metro lines, both are nowhere near where Tokyo is today if you count all kinds of the rail tracks.

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Originally Posted by drunkenmunkey888 View Post
So in the end... the authorities still decide to build a bigger network in Beijing than in Shanghai, which has a larger, more dense population. I feel like its just a prestige project so that BJ would have those extra hundred kms over Shanghai... Does this 1050 km include S1, S2, etc. suburban rails too? And I even see suburban rail networks designed for Nanjing... why the **** isn't Shanghai getting one? It needs it more than any of these cities...
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Old June 8th, 2010, 07:40 AM   #777
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drunkenmunkey888 View Post
So in the end... the authorities still decide to build a bigger network in Beijing than in Shanghai, which has a larger, more dense population. I feel like its just a prestige project so that BJ would have those extra hundred kms over Shanghai... Does this 1050 km include S1, S2, etc. suburban rails too? And I even see suburban rail networks designed for Nanjing... why the **** isn't Shanghai getting one? It needs it more than any of these cities...
Beijing municipality is more than double the area of Shanghai municipality, so inevitably trying to serve all the population in Beijing will result in more rail than in Shanghai. I doubt it has anything to do with prestige.
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Old June 8th, 2010, 11:25 AM   #778
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Quote:
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Beijing municipality is more than double the area of Shanghai municipality, so inevitably trying to serve all the population in Beijing will result in more rail than in Shanghai. I doubt it has anything to do with prestige.
I agree with you here. The other poster mention that Shanghai is denser than Beijing. For this reason, the number of km of subway will be bigger in Beijing than in Shanghai. I don't understand why he said Beijing subway is for prestige, when he himself understands that Shanghai is denser than Beijing i.e. more population serviced per station, but not necessarily more km of subway. This shows the other poster can't reason properly.
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Old June 9th, 2010, 08:05 AM   #779
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Part 4

A few steps away from the BRT line along Chaoyang Road is Jintaixizhao Station on Line 10:

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I wanted to take a quick ride on the Beijing-Tianjin HSR, so it was off to Beijing South Railway Station via Line 4. I arrived early evening, and it seemed fairly quiet through the lower parts of the station, although things were much busier in the actual waiting area several levels up.

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After a quick two-hour jaunt to Tianjin and back, it’s time to head back to the hotel.

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By this time it was already close past 10:00 pm and things were winding down...

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The next day, I head for Yiheyuan, the Summer Palace, again via Line 4. Beigongmen Station lies at the north gate of the palace grounds.

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Lots of tourists and visitors heading for the same place…

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Exit C is the most convenient to reach the palace grounds…

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The walk takes you by a busy bus stop and through a row of food stalls…

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Bus area along Yiheyuan Road…

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After several hours walking through the massive Summer Palace, we head back to Beigongmen Station, where I finally found a place I could purchase a Yikatong card after asking around everywhere—much more convenient than purchasing single-journey tickets, since the machines don’t take one-yuan bills.

At Xizhimen, we transfer from Line 4 to Line 2, alighting at Gulou Dajie Station to go see the Drum Tower.

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Some bike parking outside the station…

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Gulou (Drum Tower) bus stop

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Walking around the other side of the block takes us down a nice leafy avenue with more trolley bus action…

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To be continued…
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Old June 12th, 2010, 08:43 AM   #780
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Part 5

From Gulou Dajie, we head over to Dazhongsi Station on Line 13 to make a visit to the Great Bell Temple… Straight ahead on the other side of the window, an intercity train passes by.

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A look back at the station from a pedestrian bridge over the Third Ring Road…

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Rumbling on northward, as street vendors sell pineapple-on-a-stick to passersby.

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Line 13 trains are six cars long (originally four cars long), manufactured by the Beijing Subway Rolling Stock Equipment Company and Changchun Railway Vehicles Company.

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Line 13 was the first line in the Beijing Subway to use magnetic tickets. These faregates were manufactured by Nippon Signal.

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Time to head back…

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Our next stop is Wangfujing, a major pedestrianized shopping district. This is the view after surfacing from Wangfujing Station on Line 1:

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Approaching one end of the main drag, this section of road lacks curbs. Interesting to note is that these are actually trolley buses running off-wire.

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After some time wandering around the open-air food markets, we fast-forward to the next day, my last day in Beijing. I crammed visits to the Temple of Heaven and Qianmen in during the morning before I had to head off to Guangzhou for business.

Bikes aplenty outside Tiantan Dongmen Station at the East Gate of the temple grounds.

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Surfacing from Qianmen Station on Line 2, we are greeted by the Qianmen stop on BRT Line 1.

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The massive Qianmen gate looms in the background on the opposite side of the road…

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I am on my way to Qianmen Street, a former hutong neighborhood modernized into a shopping district and visitor attraction.

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Replica streetcar, minus the overhead.

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Nearby is the Beijing Railway Museum. I was actually hoping to visit the Beijing Urban Planning Exhibition Center, but it was closed that day.

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Walking north through Tian’anmen Square gets us to Tian’anmen Dong Station on Line 1. Transferring to Line 5 at Dongdan, we head down to Chongwenmen to visit the old city walls. I passed by this trolley bus depot at the main intersection.

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Following east above Line 2 takes us to busy Beijing Railway Station.

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After a few minutes wandering the large plaza outside, I hop on a Line 2 train to make my way to the airport. The city-side terminal for the Airport Express is at Dongzhimen Station, and trains make the journey in about 20 minutes. The line uses Bombardier’s Advanced Rapid Transit (ART) technology, with third-rail power collection and linear-motor propoulsion.

Watching some TV while I wait…

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I had a seat up in the front, with a weird box-type seating configuration. This is in the underground section of the line.

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After an intermediate stop at Sanyuanqiao, the train surfaces, here crossing above the Fourth Ring Road:

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Toll station at the airport. The Airport Express is paralleled by an Airport Expressway for most of its route.

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Getting closer…

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Entering Terminal 3 Station:

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Trains arriving at Beijing Capital International Airport traverse a one-way loop, stopping at Terminal 3 Station then Terminal 2 Station before heading back to central Beijing. My flight to Guangzhou was leaving from Terminal 1, so I stayed on until Terminal 2 Station.

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End.
Thanks for viewing.
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