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Old September 7th, 2010, 06:00 PM   #801
big-dog
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The biggest advantage of maglev is its quiteness and low operation cost (low maintenance cost)

The controversial part is the radiation concern. It's said low-speed maglev generate very low radiation compared to a normal maglev. That's the initiative of this plan.

Still Beijing residents protested against the S1 line. The government made a concession and moved part of S1 underground on the plan.
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Old September 7th, 2010, 09:15 PM   #802
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Quote:
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100km/h, it's called low-speed maglev, but faster than normal subway trains.
I hope this is the commercial speed and not the top speed of the train. Most of the conventional metro trains have commercial speed of 75-80 km/hr and top speed of 85-100 km/hr. Then what is the benefit of using maglev over conventional trains for normal line. Is the low maintenance cost enough to justify the high construction costs (if at all) or is there any other advantage ?
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Old September 8th, 2010, 04:15 AM   #803
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it's showing off China's domestically produced maglev and showing that it's feasible for a suburban railway
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Old September 8th, 2010, 04:25 AM   #804
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100 kmph-105 kmph should be the commercial speed, the top speed is around 120 kmph. but again this is not about pursuit of speed, otherwise they would choose HSR or high speed maglev.

There are many issues other than cost efficiency, for example the requirement of even distribution of passengers to make sure the train runs smoothly, this would be undesirable if S1 becomes a busy commuter line.

BTW, the cost of low speed maglev construction is higher than light rail but still lower than metro.

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Originally Posted by Abhishek901 View Post
I hope this is the commercial speed and not the top speed of the train. Most of the conventional metro trains have commercial speed of 75-80 km/hr and top speed of 85-100 km/hr. Then what is the benefit of using maglev over conventional trains for normal line. Is the low maintenance cost enough to justify the high construction costs (if at all) or is there any other advantage ?
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Old September 8th, 2010, 04:28 AM   #805
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Probably. The domestic manufacturer needs extra money from a commercial project to support further R&D; otherwise it will always remain on paper.

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it's showing off China's domestically produced maglev and showing that it's feasible for a suburban railway
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Old September 8th, 2010, 07:48 PM   #806
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BTW, the cost of low speed maglev construction is higher than light rail but still lower than metro.
I think that explains my question well. If this is true, then we may see more such lines built in place of metro in China and elsewhere.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 08:07 PM   #807
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Line 8 in Shenzhen was approved to use low-speed maglev too. We will see how things turn out on these two lines.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 09:05 PM   #808
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You mean to say how these lines turn out in "technical terms" as this technology is not tested commercially before ?
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Old September 8th, 2010, 09:26 PM   #809
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abhishek901 View Post
You mean to say how these lines turn out in "technical terms" as this technology is not tested commercially before ?
Not in technical terms. The low speed maglev trains have been tested in China on multiple test lines. And I think a similar line (Linimo) has been running for five years in Japan. Although the Chinese version might be different, technical feasibility is not an issue.

What I meant is the reaction and feedback from the passengers. Also I am interested in knowing how the authorities will manage the whole system (maglev+metro). There are some Chinese experts who strongly oppose the idea of low speed maglev, and I would like to see if they will be convinced after the lines become operational.
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Old September 11th, 2010, 09:21 AM   #810
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Do you have any links behind the technology of this Low-Speed Maglev Trains and what projects is going to be included using this technology?
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Old November 19th, 2010, 09:11 AM   #811
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Beijing light rail Daxing line pics

Daxing line will open next month (Dec 2010)







by cobble, beijingupdates.com
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Old November 19th, 2010, 10:12 AM   #812
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Is it the chinese nomenclature Light rail?? or it's just elevated metro line?
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Old November 19th, 2010, 11:18 AM   #813
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Sorry but mind to tell what the difference is?

Beijing Daxing line is 22.51 km long, with 11.78km underground, 8.47km elevated and 2.26km on the ground.
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Old November 19th, 2010, 07:38 PM   #814
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I don't think the Daxing Line is LRT. It's the extension of the Line 4 Subway.
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Old November 19th, 2010, 09:43 PM   #815
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
Sorry but mind to tell what the difference is?

Beijing Daxing line is 22.51 km long, with 11.78km underground, 8.47km elevated and 2.26km on the ground.
It's more like differences between the nomenclature. In chinese terminology "lrt" is called "surface light railway line" and means mostly elevated lines with light metro trains. "Metro/subway" stands for heavy metro lines. That's why the Shanghai line 6 is called lrt and will become in the future the symbol L4 just like other lines (lets say light metros) - now planed as lines 15, 16, 17, 18 - which will become respectively L1, L2, L3, L5.

If i rememer it right, some of the merger of the Beijing metro lines will be called LRTs as well: in the north Changping line and the merger of Line 5 the Yizhuang line in the south.

LRT in Europe means something different and in North America also something different.
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Old November 20th, 2010, 05:21 AM   #816
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz View Post
It's more like differences between the nomenclature. In chinese terminology "lrt" is called "surface light railway line" and means mostly elevated lines with light metro trains. "Metro/subway" stands for heavy metro lines. That's why the Shanghai line 6 is called lrt and will become in the future the symbol L4 just like other lines (lets say light metros) - now planed as lines 15, 16, 17, 18 - which will become respectively L1, L2, L3, L5.

If i rememer it right, some of the merger of the Beijing metro lines will be called LRTs as well: in the north Changping line and the merger of Line 5 the Yizhuang line in the south.

LRT in Europe means something different and in North America also something different.
In North America LRT basically means RER style services (lower frequency branches in the suburbs bundling together in the Central City) operated with Trams. Grade separation, train length, platform level and the presence of Underground segments tend to vary from system to system.
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Old November 20th, 2010, 04:10 PM   #817
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz View Post
It's more like differences between the nomenclature. In chinese terminology "lrt" is called "surface light railway line" and means mostly elevated lines with light metro trains. "Metro/subway" stands for heavy metro lines. That's why the Shanghai line 6 is called lrt and will become in the future the symbol L4 just like other lines (lets say light metros) - now planed as lines 15, 16, 17, 18 - which will become respectively L1, L2, L3, L5.

If i rememer it right, some of the merger of the Beijing metro lines will be called LRTs as well: in the north Changping line and the merger of Line 5 the Yizhuang line in the south.

LRT in Europe means something different and in North America also something different.
Yeah LRT in China generally refers to elevated metro trains that are usually considered heavy rail in North American terminology. What North Americans refer to as LRT are considered tram in China. In that respect, only Dalian, Changchun and Shanghai Pudong's Zhangjiang district have LRT in the North American sense
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Old December 2nd, 2010, 10:29 AM   #818
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北京就是大气!!!车站设计得多大气啊。。。喜欢!!!!我们上海的车站设计得太小气了,看上去就不痛快!!!应该向北京好好学学!!!
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Old December 2nd, 2010, 10:31 AM   #819
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很多方面北京比上海做得好,我们上海要好好反省反省!!!
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Old December 14th, 2010, 02:53 PM   #820
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From some websites, I've read that Line 13 is light rail, but here it seems metro. Which is true? Is this line light rail?
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