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Old March 1st, 2011, 06:51 PM   #861
lkstrknb
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This was emailed to me, but the link is not working for me. I tried to find this specific article, but couldn't, so I'll just post the email. It was some more interesting details.

Enjoy





BEIJING_ ".. the S1 Line will extend from Mentougou to Pingguoyuan. The construction of the line is expected to cost around 6 billion yuan ($910 million) and wrap up in 2013. .. Chang said the maglev line will consume more power than subways or light rail, though it produces less noise and needs less maintenance. "We are now studying the power supply of the maglev, and I think we will solve this problem within three years," said Chang." ..

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90...2/7303771.html

Construction starts on Beijing's maglev line

By Zhou Wa and Xin Dingding, China Daily, March 01, 2011

A maglev line using Chinese technology was brought under construction in Beijing on Monday, despite objections from residents living along the line.

The new low-to-medium speed S1 Line is the first of its kind in the country, making China the second nation in the world to have such a line, said Chang Wensen, chief project manager of the line.

The project shows China has the capability to engineer and use low-to-medium speed maglev technology, said Chang, who is also a professor at the National University of Defense Technology and leads a research team that developed the technology.

As one of the eight lines brought under construction on Monday in Beijing to form an urban transit network and help ease traffic gridlock, the S1 Line will extend from Mentougou to Pingguoyuan.

The construction of the line is expected to cost around 6 billion yuan ($910 million) and wrap up in 2013, earlier reports said.

The construction of the project was first slated to begin in the middle of last year, but was postponed several times because residents living near the proposed route worried about radiation exposure.

The worries surfaced in May when the draft plan was released. It was reported earlier that more than 300 residents living in the Bisenli community and nearby communities in Mentougou district signed a petition opposing the proposed line.

Qi Fansan and other residents in the Bisenli community, which the S1 Line will pass by some 20 meters away, are concerned about the radiation problem, even though tests indicated it will be safe.

Qi, a senior engineer with the Beijing National Railway Research and Design Institute of Signal and Communication, said he had doubts on the testing standards, which are different from European standards. "The radiation will be there, no matter how small they said it is, and its negative impact may show in one or two decades," he said.

Chang said the maglev line will not harm people living near the tracks or the environment, because earlier experiments showed the lower speed maglev train emits almost no radiation.

An expert in radiation at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, who tested the radiation of the S1 Line and asked to be anonymous, said that the testing standards the institute used are the same as the international ones, and the line will not cause problems such as radiation exposure.

Besides concerns over radiation, the power consumption of the maglev line is another problem facing Chang's research team.

Chang said the maglev line will consume more power than subways or light rail, though it produces less noise and needs less maintenance.

"We are now studying the power supply of the maglev, and I think we will solve this problem within three years," said Chang.
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Old March 2nd, 2011, 12:52 AM   #862
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Beijing to extend subway network by 110 kilometers

16:23, March 01, 2011

Eight subway lines, scheduled to open to traffic between 2013 and 2015, will link up all parts of Beijing, the capital of China, which has been plagued with high traffic for years.

Yesterday Beijing launched the construction of eight new subways and released their scheduled opening times. Construction has begun on five lines, including the west section of line No.15 and the second phase of line No.6, which are expected to open in 2014.

The rear section of the Haidianshan Line and line No.16, estimated to open in 2015, as well as the Yanfang Line, which will start to run in 2013, are listed in the Beijing railway networking planning for the year of 2015. Yesterday those three lines started preliminary construction as well.

With total investments of 12.5 billion dollars in these eight lines, Beijing plans to stretch the subway's reach into every corner of the city. An extension of existing track by 113.7 kilometers will ensure the connection of the periphery and downtown centers.

The 2015 planning intensifies its version based on the previous 561-kilometrer length track lines. The newly-added 100 kilometers are designed to increase the density of downtown track networks in order to ease the high traffic pressure.

Line No.16 stands first in this special group for this current round of construction, said Chen Xi, Planning Chief of Beijing Municipal Track Transportation Construction Management Co., Ltd.

Global travelers in Beijing will find it easier to escape the traffic while touring Beijing by taking the Xijiao Line. It links up the maple spectacle Fragrant Hill, the Botanic Garden, Wanaan Cemetery and the ancient imperial garden at the Summer Palace. The line is the known the first rail track in Beijing to use trams.

Rear section of Haidianshan bridges the high-tech side of Haidian and the administrative side of Haidian in the downtown area. Yanfang Line, the westward extension of the Fangshan Line, is created especially to spur the travel industry in Fangshan District.

By Li Yancheng, People's Daily Online

Source: http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90...0/7304667.html
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Old July 31st, 2011, 04:05 PM   #863
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Just marvellous!!!. With such type of rapid expansion of the metro system, I think Bejing will be the largest metro network in future.

But one thing confuses me; those are about Batong line, Changping Line, Daxing Line, Fangshan Line and Yizhuang Line. ARE THESE LINES METRO LINES OR SUBURBAN RAIL LINES?

If they are metro lines, why they are using such type of naming? By looking map, it is clear that except one line, they are extensions of line 1, 4, 5 & branch of line 13. So why they are not labelling these lines simply by the same numbers written above? Numbering system is very good. A single type naming is suggestable.

I suggest rename those lines by such numbering. Only the Fangshan line is completely isolated, so this is OK for separation. But others (written above) must be renumbered.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 05:03 PM   #864
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
Just marvellous!!!. With such type of rapid expansion of the metro system, I think Bejing will be the largest metro network in future.

But one thing confuses me; those are about Batong line, Changping Line, Daxing Line, Fangshan Line and Yizhuang Line. ARE THESE LINES METRO LINES OR SUBURBAN RAIL LINES?

If they are metro lines, why they are using such type of naming? By looking map, it is clear that except one line, they are extensions of line 1, 4, 5 & branch of line 13. So why they are not labelling these lines simply by the same numbers written above? Numbering system is very good. A single type naming is suggestable.

I suggest rename those lines by such numbering. Only the Fangshan line is completely isolated, so this is OK for separation. But others (written above) must be renumbered.
Only the Daxing line is an extension of the existing line. All the others require a transfer. Numbering them would be nice, but isn't essential. They're all heavy rail metro lines. You can call them suburban rail, because they are rail in suburban areas, but they function just like the metro in the center city.
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Old July 31st, 2011, 05:05 PM   #865
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AFAIK they are metro lines and not suburban rail (That is line S2), and separate from the numbered lines (Maybe Daxing line would be line 4 as it runs together). And you don't know that Fangshan line is actually an extension of line 9 opening later this year.
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Old August 7th, 2011, 03:35 PM   #866
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So you mean that numbered lines are those which is serving city area, and named lines are those which is serving suburban area - but both are metros?
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Old August 7th, 2011, 04:06 PM   #867
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Yes. Beijing has two seperate systems: the Beijing Subway, which includes the numbered and named lines, and the Beijing Suburban Railway, which currently only has one line but has big plans for expansion.
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Old August 12th, 2011, 07:28 PM   #868
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Not that, I mean suburban metros has named lines, and city metros has numbered lines?
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Old August 12th, 2011, 08:26 PM   #869
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More or less yes. And the named metro lines have the name of the suburb that they connect, except the Batong line that runs from Bawangfen aka Sihui to Tongzhou district.
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Old August 13th, 2011, 08:20 AM   #870
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Honestly in Asia the definition of commuter rail and metro is blurry. Out at the suburbs trains ar ecommuter rail, while within the metro its a subway.
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Old August 13th, 2011, 05:24 PM   #871
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Quote:
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Honestly in Asia the definition of commuter rail and metro is blurry. Out at the suburbs trains ar ecommuter rail, while within the metro its a subway.
Haha yes and if a train is underground it is a subway and if it has an above ground section, somehow it is all of a sudden a light rail.

Elevated heavy rail are called light rails and real light rails are called dingdings.
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Old August 15th, 2011, 10:48 AM   #872
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Today many people don’t know that Beijing once has a tram system. It was opened directly as an electric tram system on 24 June 1899. It had two distinct electric tram eras. The first line, which opened on June 24, 1899, connected the Ma-chia-pu Railroad Station outside the city walls with the South Gate, The two-mile route used four motorcars and four trailers, but unfortunately it was closed during the Boxer Rebellion. Beijing opened its urban tram system on December 17, 1924, after ten years of political scandals, bank failures and prolonged negotiations between the Chamber of Commerce and the city's merchant and rickshaw guilds. By the 1930s there were 94 cars operating over 25 miles of track in both the Inner and Outer cities. Beijing's last tram ran on May 6, 1966.





This is the photo of the real tram system of Beijing, which closed during sixties.

Today I heard, Beijing is running a mock tram. It was neither tram, nor bus; it was a childish tram-like vehicle, which serves the central city area as a tourist purpose. It has fake bow collectors, which don’t draw current from overhead wire, because there is no wire. This is the silliest system.

At least Beijing could introduce a real heritage tram system, just like Bursa or Istanbul. An electric rail transport is really eco-friendly, systematic & civilized. So please replace the ‘toy’ tram & start a real heritage tram.
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Old August 15th, 2011, 08:43 PM   #873
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashis Mitra View Post
Today I heard, Beijing is running a mock tram. It was neither tram, nor bus; it was a childish tram-like vehicle, which serves the central city area as a tourist purpose. It has fake bow collectors, which don’t draw current from overhead wire, because there is no wire. This is the silliest system.

At least Beijing could introduce a real heritage tram system, just like Bursa or Istanbul. An electric rail transport is really eco-friendly, systematic & civilized. So please replace the ‘toy’ tram & start a real heritage tram.
I've seen that fake tram, and it's bloody ridiculous. It looks like a box, and as far as i know it runs on diesel. GREAT. And it runs through a street where everything is made to look old, but it's all brand new. Fakers.

Beijing could really use an actual tram system, or at least extend their trolley bus network, cause the buses are really destructive to your lungs.
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Old August 21st, 2011, 03:02 PM   #874
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There are many metro lines in Beijing. But some are missing.
1) Where is line 3, 6, 7, 9, 11,12 & 14?
2) In future phases, there will be 3, 6, 7, 9, 11,12 & 14, but why they didn’t built earlier?
3) Why Beijing metro company constructed by jumping lines, i.e. directly to line 13 by a long leap from 2 to 13, and then returning back to 5, then again jumping to 8 and 10, again returning to 4, again a long jump to 15!!! Why such type of shuffling? They can number lines step by step, i.e.- 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7, as a staircase. I can’t understand thus eccentric numbering.
4) Why there was such a long gap of constructing between line 2 & 13 by almost 30 Y-E-A-R-S!!!??
5) I heard in this year, Beijing will return tram like Shanghai & Tianjin, is it true? I heard it will be called western suburban line, and will run from Bagou to Fragrant Hills? Please write some details.
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Old August 23rd, 2011, 11:57 AM   #875
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1, 2 & 3)There were lines 3, 11 and 12 planned back in late 90s, but they have taken away. They might re-enter plans soon. Lines 6, 7, 9 and 14 are U/C and line 9 will be opened later this year. Numbering is according to the plans, so line 13 is numbered as planned despite being the 3rd line to be opened.
4) I believe Beijing subway was made originally for military purposes (There are 3 more stations beyond Pingguoyuan on line 1), but then opened to all public. That was in 1981!
But there was not any constructing gap: Eastern part of line 1 opened in stages in early to mid 90s.
5) True. It's on the plans since 2008 I believe. Originally subway, they changed it to tram, and will have 9.3 km and 7 stations, namely Bagou, South gate of Summer palace, West gate of Summer palace, Yuquan country park, Wanan cemetery, Botanical gardens and Fragant hills.

Great internet, I know lots of facts about Chinese metros, and I've NEVER been to China.
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Old August 23rd, 2011, 12:29 PM   #876
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Because we are metrophiles
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Old August 23rd, 2011, 01:48 PM   #877
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Great internet, I know lots of facts about Chinese metros, and I've NEVER been to China.
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Old August 25th, 2011, 03:34 PM   #878
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So we are getting tram again Beijing this year after a long 4 decades gap?
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Old August 26th, 2011, 06:11 AM   #879
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What's with the tram agenda you're pushing?

The system is inefficient for major cities like Shanghai and Beijing which are only now starting to embrace metros for mass transit. Trams take up space, space on lanes which have to be sacrificed, and will only add to the existing road congestion.
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Old August 26th, 2011, 09:44 AM   #880
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What's with the tram agenda you're pushing?

The system is inefficient for major cities like Shanghai and Beijing which are only now starting to embrace metros for mass transit. Trams take up space, space on lanes which have to be sacrificed, and will only add to the existing road congestion.
Trams can transport more people than buses. So replacing some buses with trams will leave you more space on the road.
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