daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 7th, 2013, 08:56 AM   #1081
big-dog
Registered User
 
big-dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 14,080
Likes (Received): 6840

Line 10 replaces Line 1 to become the busiest metro line of Beijing







--sina.com
big-dog no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 7th, 2013, 11:01 AM   #1082
:jax:
Registered User
 
:jax:'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Södertälje
Posts: 1,302
Likes (Received): 540

Any other news on traffic patterns? It would be natural to think that 1 is relieved with the 6, which could part explain 10 passing it, but maybe 1 is just as busy as ever. 8 and 9 were far down the ranking, but now that they are getting more properly connected that might change. 6 should be the new east-west backbone, how does it fare relative to 1?
:jax: no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2013, 11:09 AM   #1083
Falubaz
Registered User
 
Falubaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Zielona Gora, Polska
Posts: 14,799
Likes (Received): 2940

Are they queueing?
http://i757.photobucket.com/albums/x...021_411292.jpg
A rare thing in chinese metros!
__________________
Zielona Góra - Ziemia Lubuska

₪₪₪Zielona Góra moim okiem₪₪₪ Zielonogórskie autobusy₪₪₪Port Lotniczy ZIElona Góra₪₪₪ BRT₪₪₪ścieżki rowerowe w ZG
₪₪₪[Świat] „Przebłyski pamięci”₪₪₪Moja Ameryka - nie tylko Stany
Falubaz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2013, 04:36 PM   #1084
Abhishek901
Registered User
 
Abhishek901's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 11,764
Likes (Received): 1203

Quote:
Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
Line 10 replaces Line 1 to become the busiest metro line of Beijing

--sina.com
What's the ridership for Line 10?
Abhishek901 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2013, 04:15 AM   #1085
idoke
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Beijing-HK-Jerusalem
Posts: 84
Likes (Received): 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz View Post
Are they queueing?
http://i757.photobucket.com/albums/x...021_411292.jpg
A rare thing in chinese metros!
In Beijing people do queue. Many queue also in bus stops.
idoke no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2013, 05:21 AM   #1086
_Night City Dream_
Registered User
 
_Night City Dream_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 19,157
Likes (Received): 101570

Quote:
Originally Posted by :jax: View Post
Yes, for the moment Beijing metro is largest in the world, measured in system length, that should change later in favour of Shanghai. On the other hand I believe the Beijing line 10 will the largest ring when completed and probably the longest metro tunnel already.
Seems that it is not correct data. Shanghai has got now 446 km of tracks.
__________________
Big Cities is one of the major inventions by human beings

My Baku / Мой Баку / 我的巴库

_Night City Dream_ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2013, 06:49 AM   #1087
cfredo
Registered User
 
cfredo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Stuttgart/Frankfurt
Posts: 888
Likes (Received): 1335

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz View Post
Are they queueing?
http://i757.photobucket.com/albums/x...021_411292.jpg
A rare thing in chinese metros!
Yes, it's not that unusual, but there are always some guys who don't play by the rules and the others think "**** it! Why should I?!?"...and then all the queueing is gone...
cfredo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2013, 07:30 AM   #1088
big-dog
Registered User
 
big-dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 14,080
Likes (Received): 6840

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abhishek901 View Post
What's the ridership for Line 10?
1.3256 million (Jan 4th).
big-dog no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2013, 10:22 AM   #1089
:jax:
Registered User
 
:jax:'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Södertälje
Posts: 1,302
Likes (Received): 540

The station in the pictures is Guomao (Beijing CBD), one of the busiest, if not the busiest, transfer stations in the whole system. It is my favourite station for showing Beijing crowds, and not just mine. You would commonly find somebody making a video record in the tunnels connecting lines 1 and 10 during the rush. You could find scenes like this before phase II too, in the morning rush. In any case it feels safer than lines 1 and 2 that have no glass wall to the train, and 10 has been much less crowded than 1, 2, 5, and Batong, and also less than 4.
:jax: no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2013, 05:49 PM   #1090
dale88
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Paris
Posts: 65
Likes (Received): 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by cfredo View Post
Yes, it's not that unusual, but there are always some guys who don't play by the rules and the others think "**** it! Why should I?!?"...and then all the queueing is gone...
Haha, that hasn't changed at least since the last time I went to China (2010)

I think the southern provinces, especially Guandong and cities like Shenzhen or around Guangzhou where many workers from other provincies work in factories, are much more "disorganized".

I mean no queuing, people crossing the road wherever they want and from what I saw, much of this mess involves immigrant workers.

In that contrast I found Beijing people and Shanghainese much more "organized", but I may be wrong.

dale88
dale88 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 8th, 2013, 06:51 PM   #1091
:jax:
Registered User
 
:jax:'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Södertälje
Posts: 1,302
Likes (Received): 540

Beijing is one of the most disorganised cities I've been to in China, but the metro queuing culture is fine (a bit of a scramble when the doors open and there is no queue, but not really worse than other cities inside or outside China).
:jax: no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 09:25 AM   #1092
city_thing
Put it in your mouth
 
city_thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Melbourne.
Posts: 7,128
Likes (Received): 883

Quote:
Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
Line 10 replaces Line 1 to become the busiest metro line of Beijing
Would that make it the busiest metro line in all of China (including the HKSAR) then? Or would the MTR's Island Line be busier...?
__________________
Calling occupants of interplanetary craft...
city_thing no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 09:43 AM   #1093
_Night City Dream_
Registered User
 
_Night City Dream_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 19,157
Likes (Received): 101570

Could you tell me all exact and possible information on the rolling stock for Beijing metro per lines? Interested in cars' dimensions, manufacturer and photos. Thanks.
__________________
Big Cities is one of the major inventions by human beings

My Baku / Мой Баку / 我的巴库

_Night City Dream_ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 11:12 AM   #1094
chornedsnorkack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,974
Likes (Received): 388

Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
Would that make it the busiest metro line in all of China (including the HKSAR) then? Or would the MTR's Island Line be busier...?
Actually, about that Island Line...

Island Line has 14 stations in 12,3 km, and covers the distance in 25 minutes.

But it is mostly parallel to the tram line - with 50+ stops in the same 13 km, and taking 80 minutes.

Does Beijing also need street level trams to supplement the metro?
chornedsnorkack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 12:23 PM   #1095
Falubaz
Registered User
 
Falubaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Zielona Gora, Polska
Posts: 14,799
Likes (Received): 2940

Trams? They have buses and trolleybuses. What they need is just more metros and suburban railways. Trams would be too slow for this huge city and cost a lot imo.
__________________
Zielona Góra - Ziemia Lubuska

₪₪₪Zielona Góra moim okiem₪₪₪ Zielonogórskie autobusy₪₪₪Port Lotniczy ZIElona Góra₪₪₪ BRT₪₪₪ścieżki rowerowe w ZG
₪₪₪[Świat] „Przebłyski pamięci”₪₪₪Moja Ameryka - nie tylko Stany
Falubaz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 12:28 PM   #1096
:jax:
Registered User
 
:jax:'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Södertälje
Posts: 1,302
Likes (Received): 540

At least in "new cities" like Tongzhou there are plans for local tram to complement the metro, for town traffic. I have also seen tram proposals for Guomao/Beijing CBD, roughly bounded by 10 and 14 North-South and 1 and 6 East-West. It would make sense, Beijing stations are relatively distant. Surface rail to bring travellers closer to their destination or for local transport would fit in nicely.

I hope line 10 isn't too "busy" though it has a lot of traffic. It is now a very long line, with many stations to travel by. However the frequency is, still I believe, relatively low with regular 6 car trains. It used to be busiest between the 5 and 1 interchanges, lowest traffic end station (Bagou) to 4 interchange and 1 to end (Jinsong). Where it is busiest now I don't know.
:jax: no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 07:45 PM   #1097
chornedsnorkack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,974
Likes (Received): 388

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz View Post
Trams? They have buses and trolleybuses. What they need is just more metros and suburban railways. Trams would be too slow for this huge city and cost a lot imo.
Beijing metro has 442 km and 261 stops, so about 1700 m on average between stops. 850 m walk from a metro station to a spot between stations on line, and naturally even longer to spots between lines.

Has Beijing built new trolleybus lines to serve newly opened metro stations?
chornedsnorkack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 08:01 PM   #1098
_Night City Dream_
Registered User
 
_Night City Dream_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 19,157
Likes (Received): 101570

Tram is the most sustainable kind of transport, actuallu. And I really do not understand why China spends so miuch money on building metros while neglecting tram at all.
__________________
Big Cities is one of the major inventions by human beings

My Baku / Мой Баку / 我的巴库

_Night City Dream_ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 08:13 PM   #1099
particlez
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 532
Likes (Received): 106

Falubaz has it right. There's no pragmatic point to having non grade separated rail transit in Beijing, or other large, densely populated cities. Is there a point to having a surface tram line through present-day Manhattan?

Street-level trams could work somewhere on the outskirts though. Eventually express lines will be built like the Parisian RER or even Hong Kong's west and east lines. But the initial focus should be on extending mass transit to the still unserved areas.

The Hong Kong island streetcar is a great tourist attraction and works for people who WANT to waste time, but it's mind-numbingly slow. It has to stop for pedestrians and left turning cars in addition to any number of intersections. Even synchronized red lights would be of little help because there is so much traffic and congestion everywhere. In this case, the bus is faster as it can switch lanes and get around obstacles.
particlez no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2013, 09:09 PM   #1100
chornedsnorkack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,974
Likes (Received): 388

Quote:
Originally Posted by particlez View Post
Falubaz has it right. There's no pragmatic point to having non grade separated rail transit in Beijing, or other large, densely populated cities. Is there a point to having a surface tram line through present-day Manhattan?
I think yes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by particlez View Post
Street-level trams could work somewhere on the outskirts though. Eventually express lines will be built like the Parisian RER or even Hong Kong's west and east lines. But the initial focus should be on extending mass transit to the still unserved areas.
Precisely. Such as the gaps between metro stations and lines.
Quote:
Originally Posted by particlez View Post
The Hong Kong island streetcar is a great tourist attraction and works for people who WANT to waste time, but it's mind-numbingly slow.
80 minutes for 13 km. Meaning about 10 km/h.

Walking is on the average 5 km/h - IF the pedestrian does not have to wait for traffic lights and zebras.

How does the speed of Hong Kong tram compare against pedestrians (INCL. stops at intersections)? And how does Hong Kong tram speed compare against bicycles (again including stops at intersections)?
chornedsnorkack no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
beijing, metro

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium