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Old March 14th, 2013, 05:50 AM   #1201
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Beijing to improve subway flow

Updated: 2013-03-14 06:59
By Zheng Xin ( China Daily)

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Limiting passengers during rush-hour, opening of new lines to ease congestion

The capital will further limit the number of rush-hour subway passengers and increase vehicle capacity to cope with the growing pressure on the network, said the city's transport authority.

In addition, construction of new subway lines will be accelerated to cope with the soaring number of passengers, according to the Beijing Transport Commission.



Passengers in a crowded carriage at Dongdan station on the Beijing Subway's Line 5 on Wednesday. The average daily passenger volume for subway lines in early March was 8.4 million. ZHU XINGXIN / CHINA DAILY


The authorities will also take steps to help guide passengers and prevent crushes and stampedes.

Zhan Minghui, director of the city's rail transit command center, said: "As the capital is more likely to witness a daily passenger flow of 10 million subway riders, the metro system should further extend its capacity."

According to the commission, Beijing's subway lines witnessed a record number of passengers on March 8, with 10.27 million people using the city's rail transit network.

Four of the capital's subway lines carried more than 1 million passengers that day, and the peak passenger flow on Line 10 exceeded 1.69 million, the commission said.

Considering that March does not normally see the peak passenger flow, the network's passenger flow may exceed 10 million more often in the future, especially from July to September, when it is at its busiest, said Zhan.

Zhan said one of the reasons for the significant boost is the increase in the number of subway lines in recent years.

There were only two subway lines in the city in 2002, with a total track length of 54 kilometers and 41 stations.

However, as Beijing put four new lines into operation on Dec 30, the total track length reached 442 km, with 261 stations and 36 transit stations.

The country's longest subway network will further extend its length to 561 km by 2015, with 19 lines. Its total length is expected to reach 1,000 km by 2020.

However, some residents said that despite the increase in the number of subway lines, they did not feel that riding the subway was any easier or more convenient.

"Despite the increase in subway lines and the network's improved capacity, subway cars are still too crowded and sometimes it's hard to squeeze in a car during the rush hour," said Feng Xiuqing, a 27-year-old accountant.

The morning and evening rush hours account for around 40 percent of daily passenger volume, Zhan said.

In addition, the capital's permanent resident population has soared in recent years.

According to the Beijing Population and Family Planning Commission, the capital's permanent resident population in the capital reached 20.69 million by the end of 2012, a 2.5 percent year-on-year increase.

The commission said the city's subway system has launched restrictions on passenger flow at three more stations so far this year - Hujialou, Shuangjing and Jinsong.

Passenger flow limits are in force at 43 stations across the Beijing Subway.

More police officers have been sent to traffic hubs to protect passenger safety and avoid stampedes, according to Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau.

Zhan added that the cars on subway lines currently under construction will have improved capacity.

Cao Yin contributed to the story.
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Old March 22nd, 2013, 05:14 AM   #1202
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Beiing subway line 13 after Wednesday's snow



by 高铁见闻

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Old March 24th, 2013, 10:00 AM   #1203
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Would you please tell me what type of rolling stock runs on each line? Manufacturer, length and other details. Thank you.
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Old March 25th, 2013, 07:52 AM   #1204
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Phase I of Line 14 is scheduled to open in early May

http://js.china.com.cn/xw/tplx/297748.shtml

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Old April 9th, 2013, 09:06 AM   #1205
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Line 14 | Garden Expo Park Station



source: http://www.panoramio.com/photo/88400437
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Old April 10th, 2013, 05:25 PM   #1206
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Line 14 in action. Note that HK MTR is operating the line (see logo) and the A size rolling stock (the only loading gauge that makes sense in Tier 1 cities)

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Old April 11th, 2013, 01:35 PM   #1207
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That's the coolest train I've ever seen. Was it designed and built in China?

I know Harbin uses similar cold climate trains that also look absolutely brilliant.
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Old April 11th, 2013, 02:47 PM   #1208
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saiho View Post
Line 14 in action. Note that HK MTR is operating the line (see logo)


Where is the MTR logo, I can't seem to locate it?
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Old April 11th, 2013, 04:13 PM   #1209
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Yeah line 14 beijing subway looks just like harbin metro trains. In general, beijing subway trains are narrower than other cities right? Line 14 would be an exception.
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Old April 11th, 2013, 05:44 PM   #1210
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Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
That's the coolest train I've ever seen. Was it designed and built in China?

I know Harbin uses similar cold climate trains that also look absolutely brilliant.
Yes, by designed and built by Changchun Railcar the first model was developed for Harbin. It seems to have taken a lot of Japanese/Korean EMU design cues.

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Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
Where is the MTR logo, I can't seem to locate it?
Sorry I mean the HK MTR Beijing division's logo which is different from the HK MTR and the Beijing metro logo. Its in the center of the train compare with the logos on Line 4's trains.

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Originally Posted by drunkenmunkey888 View Post
Yeah line 14 Beijing subway looks just like Harbin metro trains. In general, Beijing subway trains are narrower than other cities right? Line 14 would be an exception.
Actually Beijing metro trains are the same size as most other Chinese cities (B sized stock) but it is smaller than A size stock used in Tier 1 megacities and line 14 uses A size stock in 6 car sets.
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Old April 11th, 2013, 07:46 PM   #1211
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What are the different dimensions of A and B rolling stock? I can't find those terms anywhere else on the web.
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Old April 11th, 2013, 08:35 PM   #1212
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B size stock is 2.8m wide and ~19.5m long (there is slight variation with a .5m tolerance)
A size stock is 3m wide and 22m long.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 06:27 AM   #1213
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More Line 14 train pics. This might be my new favorite Chinese metro train.

Source


Source
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Old April 12th, 2013, 10:29 AM   #1214
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I don't understand why Beijing doesn't build lines with larger and longer trains? 112x2,8 m is much less in comparison with possible Shanghai trains on line 1 and 2, which are 190x3 m. It is much cheaper than building more lines instead.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 02:35 PM   #1215
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What is to prevent old lines from using 3m wide trains? Are the tunnels too narrow?
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Old April 12th, 2013, 05:48 PM   #1216
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I don't understand why Beijing doesn't build lines with larger and longer trains? 112x2,8 m is much less in comparison with possible Shanghai trains on line 1 and 2, which are 190x3 m. It is much cheaper than building more lines instead.
History.
When the Soviets helped the Chinese build the first metro (AKA Beijing), they adopted Russian metro construction standards. The Type B size rolling stock took on very similar (B Stock is slightly longer) in dimensions to all Ex-soviet rolling stock and Beijing stuck with the loading gauge for interoperability. Shanghai was a newer system and had exposure to international input on loading gauge selection. I could imagine that the HK MTR, who started consulting for mainland metros, played a huge role in the development of A size stock specifications which shanghai adopted. Today times are changing as Line 9 is the last urban line to be built using 6 car B size trains (112x2.8m). Line 6 and 7 uses 8 car B size trains (156x2.8m) and line 14 uses 6 car A size trains (3x132m). In the future lines 3, 11, 12, 16 and Haidian Shanhou is planned to use 8 car A size trains (3x176m), which is what is currently used in Lines 1 and 2 in Shanghai. Officials probably realized that capacity is more important interoperability and that every new line's network effect is stronger than the actual additional capacity that the line brings in its current form.

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Originally Posted by Geography View Post
What is to prevent old lines from using 3m wide trains? Are the tunnels too narrow?
pretty much. When the passenger flow is (under)estimated and loading guage selected the standard pre-designed tunnel width (safety and ventilation all factored in) for the loading guage is used (B size in this case).
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Old April 12th, 2013, 05:50 PM   #1217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saiho View Post
History.
When the Soviets helped the Chinese build the first metro (AKA Beijing), they adopted Russian metro construction standards. The Type B size rolling stock took on very similar (B Stock is slightly longer) in dimensions to all Ex-soviet rolling stock and Beijing stuck with the loading gauge for interoperability. Shanghai was a newer system and had exposure to international input on loading gauge selection. I could imagine that the HK MTR, who started consulting for mainland metros, played a huge role in the development of A size stock specifications which shanghai adopted. Today times are changing as Line 9 is the last urban line to be built using 6 car B size trains (112x2.8m). Line 6 and 7 uses 8 car B size trains (156x2.8m) and line 14 uses 6 car A size trains (3x132m). In the future lines 3, 11, 12, 16 and Haidian Shanhou is planned to use 8 car A size trains (3x176m), which is what is currently used in Lines 1 and 2 in Shanghai. Officials probably realized that capacity is more important interoperability and that every new line's network effect is stronger than the actual additional capacity that the line brings in its current form.



pretty much. When the passenger flow is (under)estimated and loading guage selected the standard pre-designed tunnel width (safety and ventilation all factored in) for the loading guage is used (B size in this case).
Not only that, Metro operations worldwide is more about sectorisation of each line, so inter operability is no longer a concern.
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Old April 13th, 2013, 08:19 AM   #1218
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saiho View Post
History.
When the Soviets helped the Chinese build the first metro (AKA Beijing), they adopted Russian metro construction standards. The Type B size rolling stock took on very similar (B Stock is slightly longer) in dimensions to all Ex-soviet rolling stock and Beijing stuck with the loading gauge for interoperability. Shanghai was a newer system and had exposure to international input on loading gauge selection. I could imagine that the HK MTR, who started consulting for mainland metros, played a huge role in the development of A size stock specifications which shanghai adopted. Today times are changing as Line 9 is the last urban line to be built using 6 car B size trains (112x2.8m). Line 6 and 7 uses 8 car B size trains (156x2.8m) and line 14 uses 6 car A size trains (3x132m). In the future lines 3, 11, 12, 16 and Haidian Shanhou is planned to use 8 car A size trains (3x176m), which is what is currently used in Lines 1 and 2 in Shanghai. Officials probably realized that capacity is more important interoperability and that every new line's network effect is stronger than the actual additional capacity that the line brings in its current form.
Thanks for the explanations. But I have some remarks and questions.

Soviet trains are actually narrower than 2.70 m, I'd say 2.60. Like trains on our favorite Shanghai line 8.

In Moscow, and I guess Beijing I. The 1950-1960s had already been a huge city, so in Moscow they have always been stations that were 160m long to accommodate a 8-car train.

And the last question.
Why do you say Shanghai trains on line 1 and 2 are "just" 176 m long as each car is 23.58 m long and probably tail cars are a bit longer?
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Old April 13th, 2013, 08:35 AM   #1219
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Quote:
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More Line 14 train pics. This might be my new favorite Chinese metro train.

Source


Source
These trains are just fantastic. Does anyone have any internal photos? China is developing a great sense of aesthetics like Japan and South Korea. These trains are much better than HK's MTR trains too. Well done China!
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Old April 13th, 2013, 02:18 PM   #1220
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I think Japanese and Korean metro trains have nothing to do with aesthetics.
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