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Old May 17th, 2014, 01:02 PM   #1641
chornedsnorkack
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Does someone have a map with existing lines plus the ones that are currently under construction, earth broken?
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Old May 17th, 2014, 10:09 PM   #1642
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Old May 18th, 2014, 01:30 PM   #1643
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :jax: View Post
About 80-85% seem to match other plans for 2020. The remaining I haven't seen before (like the Daxing airport roundabout), so on the whole it seems real, to the degree plans are real. The network is likely to look somewhat like this, if not exactly like this.
Well that huge map makes me feel there will be over 2000 km of tracks. I guess it's quite hard to build so much by 2020 and even by 2025.
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Old May 19th, 2014, 10:20 PM   #1644
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I see that huge map and I repost this even crazier map:
[IMG]http://i40.************/20piu0.jpg[/IMG]

But that is fantasy. The real plans don't have lines 16 through 21 where this map puts them.
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Old May 23rd, 2014, 05:24 AM   #1645
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A bit late but on April 30, 2014 the Beijing Subway reached a ridership record of 11.5595 million

Line 2: 1,529,800
Line 4/Daxing: 1,608,600
Line 6: 735,500
Line 9: 623,700
Line 10: 2,050,100
Changping: 189,100
Fangshan: 130,600
Yizhuang: 211,500

Obervations:
Once again Line 10 breaks 2 million passengers/day.
Line 6 and 9 have very similar ridership numbers despite one being almost half the length of the other.
Lines 1, 5, 13 and batong have not broken a record this year so far. I believe this is caused by the relief value that new subway lines are bringing.

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Old May 23rd, 2014, 12:05 PM   #1646
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Line ten does seem to be the sister to the Yamanote line more and more. Though it's almost double the length (34.5km Yamanote sen compared to 57.1km Line 10), it's meteoric rise to one of the busiest lines in the world is rather impressive.

Is line 10 restricted to only using 6 carriage trains that are approximately 119 metres in length? The only way that the Yamanote line manages to cope is due to its higher operating speed (90km/h), frequent timetable and very, very long (11 carriage - 220 metre long) trains. If line 10 continues to grow at this pace, the infrastructure must be absolutely groaning under the pressure of people...
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Old May 23rd, 2014, 02:52 PM   #1647
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Line 14, when completed, duplicates some of the functionality of 10, particularly moving people from the south, where many people live, to the east, where many people work. It will use 8 A-size cars. The future North line (which I am no fan of) and 16 line may do something similar in the north and west respectively.
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Old May 24th, 2014, 01:21 AM   #1648
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
Line ten does seem to be the sister to the Yamanote line more and more. Though it's almost double the length (34.5km Yamanote sen compared to 57.1km Line 10), it's meteoric rise to one of the busiest lines in the world is rather impressive.
Actually I think Line 2 is more like the Yamanote Line. Its 1/3 the length of line 10 with 3/4 of the ridership.

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Is line 10 restricted to only using 6 carriage trains that are approximately 119 metres in length?
Yes its a damn shame.

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Line 14, when completed, duplicates some of the functionality of 10, particularly moving people from the south, where many people live, to the east, where many people work. It will use 8 A-size cars.
Line 14 uses only 6 car A size.
Line 16 is the 8 car A size Line.
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Old May 24th, 2014, 09:01 AM   #1649
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Line 2 is sister to Moscow line 5.
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Old May 27th, 2014, 04:53 AM   #1650
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Line 10 is the major interchange line. In the map above it will have 31 transfer stations (currently 24) and 14 non-transfer stations (currently 21). It will transfer with all lines except 2, 15, 21, Changping, North, East, Fangshan extensions, and Yuquan (i.e transfer with all lines except the inner ring and some suburban lines).
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Old June 8th, 2014, 09:32 PM   #1651
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Line 7 Trains in their underground Depot

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Old June 9th, 2014, 11:42 AM   #1652
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Looks very Japanese.
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Old August 4th, 2014, 09:00 PM   #1653
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Line 7 Jiaohuachang Station



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Old August 12th, 2014, 04:17 PM   #1654
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Fare hike a billion yuan question
21 July 2014
China Daily

Throughout the world, transport fares are the concern of not only transport operators, but also commuters. A fare policy determines the amount of subsidies a public transport agency needs to cover its operation costs. It also determines which modes of transport people use and how many cars are on the streets.

This means a new fare policy in Beijing could drastically change the ways the surface and underground transport systems functions. So why do authorities want to increase transport fares?

Beijing subway yields relatively low revenue because of the flat fare of 2 yuan ($0.32) for one trip (which could extend from 500 meters to 88 kilometers - not including the airport line), creating a fiscal burden on the subway operators. It also affects the efficient allocation of resources, because without charging the appropriate fees for a service it is difficult to determine its true demand and, hence, the areas in which it needs improvements.

Across the world, the prevalent trend is to tap the revenue potential in the transport sector and thus not to keep fares low. For example, the London tube charges £4.50 ($7.7) for one trip within zone 1 (£2.10 for Oyster card holders). Similarly, in Hong Kong, the MTR charges between HK$4 ($0.51) and $46 a trip.

Fare pricing plays an important role in rationalizing passengers' behavior, particularly their choice between subways and buses. Given the 2-yuan fare in Beijing, some subway lines have to cope with passenger flows that exceed the capacity by up to 144 percent during peak hours, almost comparable to 171 percent in Japan - the world's most congested subway system. In contrast, Beijing's buses still have a supply surplus; according to rough estimates the existing fleet of buses could serve an additional 4 million passengers a day.

A reasonable fare structure, therefore, could prompt some price-sensitive commuters to use buses, or change their commuting timings or destinations, and thus ease the pressure on the metro.

But any increase in subway fares has to be justified in terms of social equity and benefits. An increase in fares would create social equity concerns, because mostly low-income people rely on public transport to commute to and from work. Besides, high subway fares could encourage more people to use cars, leading to more congestion and air pollution.

In this context, London and Hong Kong show that a well-designed fare structure would maximize the use of subsidies for helping low-income people. For example, despite their overall high transport fares, London and Hong Kong both provide healthy concessions to students, disadvantaged groups and senior citizens. Also, regular subway commuters are often offered monthly or yearly travel passes at lower rates. This is better way of providing equitable transport services than keeping fares low, which unfairly favors the high-and medium-income people.

Moreover, the fact that the London tube has a fairly high share (44 percent) and Hong Kong MTR a very high share (more than 70 percent) of the total commuters shatters the myth that high subway fares would deter commuters from using public transport and encourage them to use cars instead. If low fares attract more commuters, how come the share of trips made by cars in Beijing has risen from 25 percent to 33 percent since the beginning of the "subway boom" in the city.

But it is important to realize that reforming the subway fare structure is only the first step toward improving Beijing's entire public transport mechanism, including subways, buses, bicycle lanes and pedestrian facilities. After all, one of the reasons the Beijing subway is overcrowded is the lack of viable transport alternatives.

An increase in subway fares may prompt some commuters to take buses. But that does not necessarily mean that bus services are ready to accommodate an increasing flow of passengers. In fact, the lack of exclusive bus lanes and unreliability of surface transport, particularly because of traffic jams, make regular bus services a weak rival to the subway.

Beijing needs a proper network of different transport modes with varied levels of services and fare structures to cater to the demands of different passenger groups, from permanent residents to tourists, senior citizens to children, and private car owners to dedicated public transport users.

Despite the strong public objection to any increase in transport fares, putting in place a reasonable fare structure is the best way to improve the quality of public transport in Beijing. The authorities, however, should know that improvement means ensuring affordable transportation for low-income people, and equally importantly, providing high quality, reliable transport services so that even car owners are allured into using them. Only in this way can the public transport system function efficiently and cause the least harm to the environment.

The author is director of EMBARQ China, World Resources Institute.
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Old August 12th, 2014, 08:47 PM   #1655
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From Rail Journal:

Quote:
http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=542

Beijing orders first driverless metro trains
Tuesday, August 12, 2014



CHINA Northern Locomotive and Rolling Stock Corporation (CNR) has been awarded a contract to supply a fleet of 60 driverless trains for the first metro line in Beijing to be equipped for Unattended Train Operation (UTO).

The 10-station Yanfang Line will run for 15.2km from an interchange with the Fangshan Line at Cheliangduan station to Raolefu, where the line will divide into two branches serving Zhoukoudianzhen and Yanhua. Commercial services are expected to begin in December 2015.

This is the first UTO installation in China with all subsystems developed and supplied by a domestic manufacturer. The line will be equipped with communications-based train control (CBTC) supplied by Beijing Traffic Control Technology and CNR says automation systems on the line will meet IEC 62267 standards at Grade of Automation (GOA) Level 4.

The stainless-steel Type B trains will have a maximum speed of 80km/h. The first two trains will be delivered in May 2015
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Old August 19th, 2014, 08:37 AM   #1656
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Beijing metro openings by the end of 2014
  • Line 7
  • Line 6 phase II
  • Line 14 East
  • Line 15 West
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Old August 19th, 2014, 12:45 PM   #1657
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Interesting, for a while there will be two lines 14, one (the current one) running East-West from Zhangguozhuang to Xiju and another running North-South from Jintailu to Shangezhuang, with the middle section missing.

And where line 15 will end? At Beishatan or at Qinghuadong?
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Last edited by CNGL; August 19th, 2014 at 04:51 PM. Reason: Fixed :P
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Old August 20th, 2014, 03:31 PM   #1658
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Quote:
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Beijing metro openings by the end of 2014
  • Line 7
  • Line 6 phase II
  • Line 14 East
  • Line 15 West
Will it surpass Shanghai metro in terms of mileage?
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Old August 21st, 2014, 04:49 AM   #1659
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Will it surpass Shanghai metro in terms of mileage?
It won't.

Even not counting Maglev and Line 22, Shanghai's metro length will be around 576km by the end of 2014; Beijing's 2014 openings will be a bit over 60km, so Beijing metro's total length will be around 528km by the end of this year.
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Old September 9th, 2014, 09:36 PM   #1660
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
Beijing metro map by the end of 2014



map made by punch, ditiezu.com
Hello!!
This year
Line 14 from Shangezhuang (North) to Jiulongshan (South) opened???
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