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Old May 3rd, 2016, 08:48 PM   #281
Gusiluz
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Number of high-speed passenger

Passengers in THSRC HS trains (millions)
2007: 15,558
2008: 30,581
2009: 32,349
2010: 36,940
2011: 41,629
2012: 44,526
2013: 47,486
2014: 48,025
2015: 50,562
TOTAL: 347,656

Passengers-kilometers in THSRC HS trains (billions)
2007: 3,520
2008: 6,566
2009: 6,864
2010: 7,491
2011: 8,148
2012: 8,642
2013: 9,118
2014: 9,235
2015: 9,655
TOTAL: 69,239

Source: Taiwan High Speed Rail. Wikipedia.ch

Passengers and Passengers-kilometers world data, and explanation of the fact that the operators and the UIC count -in some cases- the number of passengers on high-speed trains, not on high-speed lines.
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Old May 4th, 2016, 02:56 AM   #282
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horlick97 View Post
Taiwan's HSR is not very long. oonly about 339km. This is largely due to the geographical size of the island. Its operating top speed is 300km/hr.

Due to the stops, the distance between stops are not very big. Given that some distance will be needed for acceleration and decceleration, as well as the terrain and curvature, I suspect the actual distance available for high speed travel is actually not very much.

Does anyone know this information?

Just for argument sake, it could have been better off for Taiwan to just adopt a single cape gauge conventional rail network with the intercity designed for a max speed of 200km/hr (with an actual average speed of say, 150km/hr). The fares would have been more affordable, and the whole project would have been more financial sustainable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Distance between stations. THSR does have express services.

1 stop adds 6 minutes to travel time.


Taiwan still has cape gauge rail network, at what, 130 km/h? Would upgrading the cape gauge network to 200 km/h have wiped out planes like new 300 km/h line did?

Services that stop at every station mostly travel at 270kph due to the incredibly short distances between stations (It takes 7 minutes to travel between Taoyuan and Hsinchu, when the same trip takes 40 minutes by car). However, the main issue is that unlike the cape gauge network, which threads through most of the city centers, most of the THSR stations are greenfield stations (i.e. built in the middle of nowhere) in a failed attempt to promote development. This means that one is adding 15-20 minutes of travel time to the station on each end, thereby eroding THSR's time competitiveness. It should be noted that THSR is widely considered to be very expensive by most Taiwanese, who regard it as a "rich man's toy".

Taiwan is actually already in the progress of upgrading its cape gauge network. The areas around Taichung and Taoyuan are set to be elevated, grade-separated, or straightened out to allow faster and smoother operation up to 160kph. Additional branch lines have been built connecting the cape gauge network to the THSR stations (somewhat alleviating the Final Leg issue mentioned above).

However, it should be noted that this aggressive upgrade of the TRA is directly caused by THSR's success (the main issue is not ridership; while lower than estimated, THSR's financial burden is mostly due to poor financing with high interest rates). TRA had been the laughingstock of the Taiwanese public for quite some time for being notoriously inefficient and sluggish as it was monopolizing the transportation network of Taiwan. The arrival of a private railway company promising a 90-minute ride between Taipei and Kaosiung has helped pushed the public operator to be more competitive:
  • Reduction of travel time between Taipei and Kaosiung down from 9 hours to under 5 hours.
  • Reduction of delays and increase in punctuality, from an average of 20min delay to under 5 minutes.
  • Service frequency increased to 10-minute intervals (5 minutes during rush hour)
  • Fast-tracking the electrification project on the East Coast.
  • Grade separation and infrastructure upgrades.
  • "Metro-lization" (接運化), or the gradual transformation of the TRA from a mainly regional express service to a focus on local heavy commuter rail. This is accomplished by the construction of small stations in an effort to offer better connectivity for more people. (The drawback for this is a reduction in capacity for non-stop express trains, but TRA has chosen to clearly concede this to THSR.)
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Old May 4th, 2016, 06:38 PM   #283
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I read that with the timetable revision on April 21, TRA has introduced a Puyuma Ltd Express service which does the Taipei - Kaohsiung run in 3 hours 40 minutes. Of course the THSR beats this readily with its 96 minutes, but the ticket price for the TRA service is 843 Taiwan dollars compared to 1490 for HSR. Only one r/t a day though.
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Old May 4th, 2016, 07:09 PM   #284
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Swordsman View Post
However, the main issue is that unlike the cape gauge network, which threads through most of the city centers, most of the THSR stations are greenfield stations (i.e. built in the middle of nowhere) in a failed attempt to promote development. This means that one is adding 15-20 minutes of travel time to the station on each end, thereby eroding THSR's time competitiveness. It should be noted that THSR is widely considered to be very expensive by most Taiwanese, who regard it as a "rich man's toy".

Taiwan is actually already in the progress of upgrading its cape gauge network. The areas around Taichung and Taoyuan are set to be elevated, grade-separated, or straightened out to allow faster and smoother operation up to 160kph.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Swordsman View Post
  • "Metro-lization" (接運化), or the gradual transformation of the TRA from a mainly regional express service to a focus on local heavy commuter rail. This is accomplished by the construction of small stations in an effort to offer better connectivity for more people. (The drawback for this is a reduction in capacity for non-stop express trains, but TRA has chosen to clearly concede this to THSR.)
How is the speed and frequency of limited expresses affected by the additional small stations?
For example, take the section Banqiao-Miaoli.
On HSR, it is 91,7 km, with 2 intermediate stations not on Trunk Line:
  1. Taoyuan
  2. Hsinchu
On Trunk Line, the distance Banqiao-Fengfu is 101,9 km. I counted 20 intermediate stations.
Is there any demand for limited expresses?
Like a train travelling Banqiao-Hsinchu that does stop and pick up passengers at Shulin, Taoyuan, Zhongli - but is not slowed down by stopping at Fuzhou, Shanjia, Yingge, Neili, Puxin, Yangmei, Fugang, Beihu, Hukou, Xinfeng, Zhubei, North Hsinchu, nor by trains which stop there?

Also: Miaoli station has been open for some time.
How well are Miaoli and Fengfu stations integrated to each other?
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Old May 5th, 2016, 11:49 AM   #285
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
How is the speed and frequency of limited expresses affected by the additional small stations?
For example, take the section Banqiao-Miaoli.
On HSR, it is 91,7 km, with 2 intermediate stations not on Trunk Line:
  1. Taoyuan
  2. Hsinchu
On Trunk Line, the distance Banqiao-Fengfu is 101,9 km. I counted 20 intermediate stations.
Is there any demand for limited expresses?
Like a train travelling Banqiao-Hsinchu that does stop and pick up passengers at Shulin, Taoyuan, Zhongli - but is not slowed down by stopping at Fuzhou, Shanjia, Yingge, Neili, Puxin, Yangmei, Fugang, Beihu, Hukou, Xinfeng, Zhubei, North Hsinchu, nor by trains which stop there?

Also: Miaoli station has been open for some time.
How well are Miaoli and Fengfu stations integrated to each other?
The limited express usually has the following stopping pattern: Taipei, Banciao, Taoyuan, Zhongli, Hsinchu. Express services still see quite a lot of traffic as they are quite cheap, but it is much better compared to before THSR opened--so long as one does not travel during rush hour, one can usually get a seat.

I am not sure about the integration between Fengfu and Miaoli THSR Station. I would have imagined that the station would have been rebuilt next to the THSR station at some point.
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Old May 20th, 2016, 07:08 AM   #286
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Next-generation Shinkansen order expected from Taiwan

(This was posted over at the Japan-specific forum by Sr. Horn)

Quote:
The Yomiuri Shimbun
Next-generation Shinkansen cars developed for the overseas market by Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Tokai) and others are expected to be adopted for Taiwan’s high-speed railway line, according to sources.

The scale of the order is expected to be up to about ¥100 billion for 14 trains (168 cars in total) and the trains will start operations as early as fiscal 2020.

As Japan is trying to export high-speed trains through joint efforts of the public and private sectors, it is expected to develop momentum to expand the adoption in other countries.
http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0002949746
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Old May 24th, 2016, 05:32 PM   #287
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Rail company, weather bureau to develop quake warning system
29 March 2016
Taipei Times Excerpt

The Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSRC) yesterday signed a memorandum of understanding with the Central Weather Bureau, agreeing to study the possibility of building an earthquake warning system to prevent train derailments when an earthquake strikes the nation.

Also, the bureau is to provide information on typhoons to the rail company before issuing a sea alert.

Bureau of High Speed Rail (BHSR) Director-General Allen Hu said the high-speed rail in Taiwan has the same operating system as the Shinkansen network operated by Japan Railway Groups.

Hu said that the BHSR has already installed earthquake sensors along the nations high-speed railways to detect earthquakes and reduce possible damage to the system.

The sensors were triggered when a magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck Jiasian in Kaohsiung in 2010, lowering the quakes impact on the rail system, Hu said.

He said that six trains were forced to halt operations due to the 2010 earthquake, but only one of them was derailed, adding that four of them were traveling at 300kph when the earthquake struck.

Hu said that the weather bureau has also been working to build an earthquake warning system, which is of comparable quality with the system developed in Japan.

He said that the rail company and the weather bureau can work together to improve the train safety operations when an earthquake hits the nation.

The BHSR said that if an earthquake hits 200km from the high-speed rail, the system would assess if the lateral force brought by the quake would require the slowing down or cessation of operations. The operator would have about 10 seconds to slow down or stop the train, the BHSR said.

The BHSR said that one of the challenges of building such a system is that it requires a large database to assess earthquakes and their potential impacts on the high-speed rail system.
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Old May 31st, 2016, 11:55 AM   #288
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THSRC timetable revision July 1

Quote:
Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSRC) yesterday announced that an overhaul of its timetable will take place in conjunction with the inauguration of Nangang (南港) Station in Taipei on July 1.

The number of trips will be reduced from 969 per week to 943 per week, due to an adjustment of train schedules for stations that do not have high passenger occupancy rates during off-peak hours, the company said.

The company is also to increase the number of trains stopping at Taoyuan and Hsinchu stations during rush hours on weekdays to satisfy the needs of passengers commuting to and from Taipei.
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiw.../28/2003647321
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Old May 31st, 2016, 04:12 PM   #289
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Notably, the trip time Nangang-Taipei shall be 10 minutes departure to departure. End to end time by expresses shall be 105 minutes for 348,5 km.
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Old May 31st, 2016, 05:26 PM   #290
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I never understood the point of building Miaoli, Changhua and Yunlin stations. With the TRA getting faster and more comfortable trains they were always more likely to hoover up the passengers from these cities due to the price difference between TRA and HSR. The point of the HSR is that it is fast but taking a train that stops at all the stations along the route means it loses a lot of it's speed advantage over the TRA. Opening the HSR line to Nangang will be excellent for people transferring from Taoyuan airport directly to expos like computex but the problem is that Nangang station is still about a fifteen minute walk from the expo centre area, although it is only one stop on the MRT so people will most likely use that, it will still be a bit of an irritation though.
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Old June 11th, 2016, 11:33 AM   #291
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Originally Posted by Noodles7 View Post
I never understood the point of building Miaoli, Changhua and Yunlin stations. With the TRA getting faster and more comfortable trains they were always more likely to hoover up the passengers from these cities due to the price difference between TRA and HSR. The point of the HSR is that it is fast but taking a train that stops at all the stations along the route means it loses a lot of it's speed advantage over the TRA. Opening the HSR line to Nangang will be excellent for people transferring from Taoyuan airport directly to expos like computex but the problem is that Nangang station is still about a fifteen minute walk from the expo centre area, although it is only one stop on the MRT so people will most likely use that, it will still be a bit of an irritation though.
Very true especially for Taichung. The high-speed station is very far from the city centre. I might as well catch a regular express TRA train and save some money even.
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Old June 19th, 2016, 08:02 AM   #292
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Japan focuses on Asia in its bid to sell shinkansen abroad
17 June 2016
Nikkei Report Excerpt

TOKYO -- Japan's efforts to win orders for "shinkansen" bullet trains to other Asian countries is a key part of the nation's economic growth strategy, and Central Japan Railway (JR Tokai) is stepping up efforts to pitch the train as archrival China is intensifying its activities to promote its own version of high-speed rail.

The shinkansen's strength is in its safety and reliability, and JR Tokai, one of the shinkansen operators, is emphasizing these factors in its attempts to impress Asian customers.

But so far, the only shinkansen successfully exported by JR Tokai and brought into operation is a Taiwanese line linking Taipei and Kaohsiung.

That line is enjoying brisk business. A train that departed from Taipei bound for Zuoying at 9 a.m. on a sunny day in May left with nearly all its seats occupied.

The line's popularity has grown significantly, with the average daily passenger count, which initially was below 50,000, having nearly tripled to 140,000 currently.

Performance-wise, too, the train is delivering on the shinkansen's reputation for operational time-accuracy. According to the operator, Taiwan High Speed Rail, the average delay for the trains is about 0.2 minute, making it no less punctual than the Tokaido Shinkansen line back home.

And before the bullet train's launch in 2007, train travel over the 345km between Taipei and Zuoying took more than four hours. The new train links the stations in just an hour and a half.

THSR plans to extend the line in July, and JR Tokai has acted as consultant to the project. But the Japanese company's ambitions go beyond that: To win orders for new trains to replace existing ones, which THSR plans to replace in phases in the near future.

If JR Tokai receives the expected number of orders for the new "N700-I Bullet" trains being developed for overseas customers, for the renewals, the company calculates that the revenues could total 100 billion yen to 150 billion yen ($950 million to $1.42 billion).

JR Tokai officials did not waste a key opportunity to pitch the new train late last year when THSR representatives visited Japan to inspect it. They appealed to the Taiwanese by emphasizing, among other things, their ability to adapt the train to actual situations in the country and the region, while retaining the features of the existing model.

THSR Chairman Victor Liu, while expressing interest in the Japanese train, said they "want to consider trains other than the Japanese one and choose the most suitable one."
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Old June 26th, 2016, 06:13 PM   #293
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彰化高鐵站 Changhua High Speed Rail Station - 7(Changhua, Taiwan) by 葉 正道 Ben, on Flickr
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Old June 26th, 2016, 11:34 PM   #294
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodles7 View Post
I never understood the point of building Miaoli, Changhua and Yunlin stations. With the TRA getting faster and more comfortable trains they were always more likely to hoover up the passengers from these cities due to the price difference between TRA and HSR. The point of the HSR is that it is fast but taking a train that stops at all the stations along the route means it loses a lot of it's speed advantage over the TRA. Opening the HSR line to Nangang will be excellent for people transferring from Taoyuan airport directly to expos like computex but the problem is that Nangang station is still about a fifteen minute walk from the expo centre area, although it is only one stop on the MRT so people will most likely use that, it will still be a bit of an irritation though.
THSR presence in Taiwan is a bit unique as, aside from simply being an express artery between Taipei and Kaosiung, it is a "force in being": a monopoly breaker whose minimum level of service forces other operators to be more competitive. Prior to THSR's opening, the long-distance travel market in Taiwan was held predominately by the TRA, with air travel considered an expensive premium; since there was very little competitive overlap. The TRA, hands already full with a saturated mainline, enjoyed a monopoly and had very little incentive to improve their services: previously it would take around 5-6 hours to travel between Taipei and Kaosiung and trains were frequently late.

On the other hand, THSR's greenfield stations in Taoyuan, Miaoli, Yunlin, Changhua, and Tainan are a failed example of Transit-Oriented Development, and is one of the reasons why THSR is struggling financially. Much of THSR's financing structure had relied on the development of land properties around the stations, which would also serve as a stable customer base reliant on the railway service. The failure to develop the land around the stations (the Taiwanese economy is very sluggish and repressed, the high premiums, demanded by THSR as per their reliance on the scheme, and the general lack of connectivity between the THSR station and the local transportation network) all contribute to a reluctance to develop the land around the station as aggressively as THSR had originally hoped, which also drives down ridership.

However, at its very core, the inclusion of THSR breaks the monopoly on long-distance travel previously enjoyed by the TRA. The potential loss of customers forces TRA to shape up and become more competitive, and at the same time, market desaturation also allows TRA an opportunity to specialize, such as "metrofication", as well as prioritize certain agendas without fears of causing severe damage to Taiwan's regional connectivity.

The interesting conclusion therefore, is that even though THSR's greenfield stations have failed their primary objective, their presence remains a prominent "force in being", and is the principle driving force of TRA's "metro-fication" and "modernization" projects. It should therefore be interesting to conclude that if it were not for the greenfield THSR stations in Miaoli, Changhua, Yunlin, and Chiayi, the TRA simply would not have the incentive to invest. By its very nature of increasing station density, "metro-fication" sacrifices long-distance express service slots in favor of more frequent short-range commuter trains; a decision that would have been suicidal for all of Taiwan if a transportation alternative were not in place.

Lastly, perhaps the best news of all is that THSR's stations should not be counted as an entire failure. Although the decision to build most of the stations in isolated, undeveloped areas proved to be a dangerous (and ultimately fatal) gamble on the part of the railway operator, the only failure is a disconnect between long-term planning and short-term financial requisites. Greenfield stations are almost always underutilized at the beginning (a critical point for a company desperate to quickly recoup its investment costs), but ultimately are critical long-term development catalysts and help magnetize growth into a dense new urban core in favor of unregulated suburban sprawl. The only reason why building Miaoli and Yunlin stations seem unnecessary is because the full socioeconomic effects have yet to be fully realized.
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Old June 30th, 2016, 01:11 PM   #295
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in taiwan high speed rail by giwaigiwai, on Flickr
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Old July 5th, 2016, 06:17 PM   #296
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The HSR is now open to Nangang station. This will help to relieve some pressure on the crowded Taipei main station.

http://www.chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/n...ngangs-HSR.htm
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Old July 21st, 2016, 06:27 PM   #297
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高鐵南港新站 / THSR Nangang Station, Taipei by Isien Kuo, on Flickr
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Old October 4th, 2016, 05:16 AM   #298
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Sept. 21, 2016
Taipei Times Excerpt
THSR outlines plans for improving services, finances

Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSR, 台灣高鐵) yesterday outlined plans for improving its service quality, ridership numbers and financial condition at an earnings conference ahead of the company’s listing on the Taiwan Stock Exchange next month.

The high-speed rail service, which was developed as a build-operate-transfer (BOT) project, sustained years of losses and incurred mounting debts since its launch in 2007 before it turned profitable in 2014.

“The company has overcome tremendous hurdles in the past and its finances are stabilizing as depreciation pressure diminishes,” THSRC chairman Victor Liu (劉維琪) said.

The company, which is listed on the Taipei Exchange’s Emerging Stock Board, plans to issue 23 million common shares that would raise an estimated NT$264.5 million (US$8.43 million), it said.

Under the restructuring plan, the company is reducing its share capital by 60 percent, and redeeming its preferred shares and 60 percent of its common shares.

“With passenger count exceeding 50 million per year, higher than the break-even point of 43 million, we expect the company to maintain its growth due to continued expansion in ridership,” Liu said.

Liu said that passenger counts at the new stations in Miaoli, Changhua and Yunlin have increased total ridership by 2.3 percent, higher than the projected 1 percent, despite speculation that the investments would not generate returns.

To continue improving ticket sales, which make about 98 percent of the company’s earnings, Liu said priority would be given to improving the services for homebound travelers returning to Yunlin and Miaoli from the industrial centers in Hsinchu and Taichung, adding that Changhua has been designated as a hub for day-long excursions in central Taiwan for local tourists.

The company generates a cash inflow of about NT$15 billion per year, which would enable it to pay its debts estimated at about NT$300 billion, Liu said.

Last year, a government-backed financial restructuring plan allowed the company to write off accumulated losses and post a net income of NT$20.87 billion, or earnings per share of NT$7.19, for last year on sales of NT$51.9 billion, the company said.
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Old October 16th, 2016, 08:12 PM   #299
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Old October 18th, 2016, 07:01 PM   #300
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