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Old December 12th, 2006, 07:34 PM   #121
ntly1
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Very impressive indeed ! Congratulation !
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Old January 2nd, 2007, 09:47 AM   #122
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Taiwan president takes 'bullet train,' shrugs off safety concerns

TAICHUNG, TAIWAN, Jan 1, 2007 (AFP) - President Chen Shui-bian spoke highly of Taiwan's newly completed high-speed rail system while taking a test ride Monday, four days before the controversial project begins commercial test runs.

Chen repeatedly gave the thumbs-up gesture during the trip, which took him to central Taichung and southern Kaohsiung cities.

"It's very smooth," Chen told reporters covering the trip, adding that much of the criticism and safety concerns about the system was groundless.

The Taiwan High Speed Rail Corporation (THSRC) said 10 days of commercial test runs for the much heralded bullet train system will begin Friday, with fares at a 50 percent discount.

THSRC said the launch date of full-fare commerical operations was yet to be decided but some media speculated it would be January 15.

When completed, the 345-kilometer (215-mile) service will link the capital Taipei in the north with Kaohsiung in 90 minutes.

At the start of full operations, THSRC plans 19 return trips each day and eventually hopes to significantly increase services.

The high speed rail system marks the first export of Japan's famous bullet train, which can reach speeds of 300 kilometers per hour. The Taiwan system is designed to transport 100 million passengers a year.

THSRC had originally hoped to start commercial runs on October 31, 2005 but delays thwarted that ambition and cost the company an extra 19.3 billion dollars (590 million US), according to company officials.

The transport ministry last month imposed new safety requirements after a minor derailment on November 24 during a test run, which followed a similar incident on October 31.

Japan's Taiwan Shinkansen Consortium won the three billion US dollar contract in 1998 for the supply of the core system -- trains and carriages as well as signalling, electrification, communications and operation control.
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Old January 2nd, 2007, 04:45 PM   #123
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Taiwan High Speed Rail Train Services Commence On 5 January 2007

THSR train services between Banqiao Station (outside Taipei City Center) & Zuoying Station (outside Kaohsiung City Center) commences on 5 January 2007 for 10 days. The official opening is expected after this period.

Tickets for journey made during this period went on sale on 2 January 2007 at half price. In general, fares for the 90 minute trip between Banqiao and Zuoying Stations are about twice as expensive as the cheapest Taiwan Railway Administration (TRA) conventional trains which take 6 hours.

Last edited by ignoramus; January 2nd, 2007 at 04:51 PM.
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Old January 7th, 2007, 09:19 AM   #124
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Taiwan 'Shinkansen' debuts
Toshinao Ishii/Yomiuri Shimbun Correspondent

The first train on the newly opened Taiwan High Speed Rail line bound for Kaohsiung leaves Banciao Station at 7 a.m. Friday.Taiwan's new high-speed train system incorporating Shinkansen bullet train technology for the first time outside Japan started operations Friday.

With a maximum speed of 300 kph, the Taiwan High Speed Rail train covers the 345 kilometers between Taipei in the north and Kaohsiung, the second-largest city on the island in the south, in 90 minutes.

A section of the line between Taipei and neighboring city Banciao, however, will not open until February, due to a delay in construction.

The first trains left Banciao and two other stations at 7 a.m., Friday. The train will do 19 round trips a day for the time being, but more are scheduled.

The train system was built by a Japanese consortium comprising Mitsui & Co., Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. and Toshiba Corp., that won the contract from former President Lee Teng-hui's administration in 1999, fending off competition from a European consortium.

The type of train used for the new line is the 700T, the same type as the Nozomi express trains used on the JR Tokaido-Sanyo Shinkansen line.

The total cost ran to 480 billion New Taiwan dollars (1.73 trillion yen).

While Taiwan does not maintain diplomatic relations with Japan, the project is seen as a symbol of economic and technological exchange in the private sector between Japan and Taiwan.


Last edited by tr; January 7th, 2007 at 09:36 AM.
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Old January 7th, 2007, 11:04 AM   #125
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Great news.
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Old January 7th, 2007, 01:45 PM   #126
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Passengers departing on train #415 should proceed to track 2 for boarding.....




-----------------------------------------------------------------------



Taipei Banciao Station







Taoyuan Station, 14 minutes





Hsinchu Station, 28 minutes







Taichung Station, 55 minutes









Chiayi Station, 77 minutes







Tainan Station, 103 minutes









Kaohsiung Zuoying Station, 120 minutes





Thank you! Enjoy your stay in Kaohsiung.

Last edited by tr; January 7th, 2007 at 05:18 PM.
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Old January 7th, 2007, 03:15 PM   #127
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Superb!
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Old January 7th, 2007, 04:58 PM   #128
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At least 5 tunnels in a row~~~ It looks really cool.
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Old January 8th, 2007, 04:41 AM   #129
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Amazing project!!!

I just ask myself, if it was necessary to built so much bridges

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Old January 8th, 2007, 07:45 PM   #130
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Amazing project!!!

I just ask myself, if it was necessary to built so much bridges
Bridges can be built to absorb shock wave withstanding earthquake to avoid major damage interruptting train services for a long time; where building on ground doesn't serve that funtion. Also, it also reduces the environmental impact on existing ground, i.e. less regrading.
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Old January 8th, 2007, 08:01 PM   #131
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Absolutely amazing system.
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Old January 8th, 2007, 10:06 PM   #132
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Looks like a fantastic system! Are the tracks elevated for the whole length of the system?
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Old January 9th, 2007, 07:33 AM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frog View Post
Looks like a fantastic system! Are the tracks elevated for the whole length of the system?
73% viaduct (252 km)
18% tunnel (62 km)
9% at grade (31 km)
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Old January 10th, 2007, 03:25 PM   #134
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world's longest viaduct - 157.317 kilometers

HSR system sets several world records

2007/1/5
The China Post staff

Taiwan's high-speed rail (HSR) system, which officially debuted this morning, has set quite a few records domestically and globally, in addition to linking the island's north and south and dramatically altering its economic landscape.

It is the world's most expensive single BOT (build, operate and transfer) project, with total construction cost running up to NT$480.6 billion.

The system has witnessed the injection of the largest amount of engineering manpower ever seen for a transportation infrastructure project, with more than 2,000 professional engineers from over 20 countries as well as over 20,000 domestic and foreign workers joining the project.

Also, up to 73 percent of the rail system is elevated railway and bridges, 18 percent tunnels, and 9 percent on ground roads, with the world's longest elevated rail, running from Pakuashan in central county of Changhua to Tsoying in Kaohsiung, measuring 157.317 kilometers.

The system has a total of 48 tunnels, including the longest one of 7.4 kilometers crossing the Pakuashan in Changhua County. But it took only 17 months to carve the Pakuashan tunnel, marking the shortest time required for similar engineering in Taiwan.

In addition, the system is also the world's first outside of Japan based on bullet train technology.

Trains will speed along the 345 km (214 mile) line roughly every hour, coming close to the island's major southern port and hitting eight stations in densely populated western Taiwan.

The launch of the rail will cut travel time between Taiwan's top two cities, Taipei in the north and Kaohsiung in the south, to about 90 minutes from up to five hours on the conventional rail service.

The system represents a colossal effort to provide state of the art transportation solutions to Taiwan's 23 million people, while conserving energy and preserving the environment.

Construction of the system began in 2000 with an original launch date of October 2005, but a delay in the completion of the project's core electrical systems forced a postponement to October 2006.

The service was further held up after the operator failed to obtain a safety certification from independent verification and validation firm Lloyd's Register. The certification was eventually obtained on Nov. 20.

Nevertheless, the government has high hopes about the economic benefits of the service which will cut three hours off the current four-and-a-half hour journey between Taipei and Kaohsiung.

President Chen Shui-bian, who took a test ride on Monday, ambitiously asserted that "the revolutionary vehicle would virtually transform Taiwan into a city state like Singapore."

Possibilities of commuting to Taipei from central Taichung or even Kaohsiung, unthinkable previously, are now being widely discussed.

And land prices around the line's eight stations -- formerly rice paddies or sugarcane farms -- have soared, turning hundreds of farmers into millionaires.

The railway system will be managed by the THSRC for 35 years before it is turned over to state control under the terms of the build-operate-transfer project.

Japan's Taiwan Shinkansen Consortium won the US$3 billion contract in 1998 for the supply of the core system -- trains and carriages as well as signalling, electrification, communications and operation control.

Source: http://www.chinapost.com.tw/latestnews/200715/43481.htm

By the way, here is previous list of longest bridges/viaducts by Wikipedia. Needs an update:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bridges_by_length
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Old January 10th, 2007, 08:05 PM   #135
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Incredible pictures. Looks like pretty good coverage too - right down the spine of Taiwan.
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Old January 13th, 2007, 11:06 AM   #136
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Fabulous....

I want to travel to Taiwan.
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Old January 14th, 2007, 12:30 AM   #137
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In the picture with the tunnels, why don't they just dig a trench? The tunnels are very short and it doesn't look like its going through an impassable mountain that can only be tunneled through. The only reason I can think of is to preserve land area and to allow wildlife passage...
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Old January 14th, 2007, 04:27 AM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alta-bc View Post
In the picture with the tunnels, why don't they just dig a trench? The tunnels are very short and it doesn't look like its going through an impassable mountain that can only be tunneled through. The only reason I can think of is to preserve land area and to allow wildlife passage...
Yeah, I think one of the main focus and worries of THSR project was not to destroy the wildlife and be as environmentally friendly as possible.
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Old January 14th, 2007, 05:30 PM   #139
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the land hasn't been tunneled through any way, trenches have been dug as you suggested then covered over, hence why there is no trees above the tunnels
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Old January 14th, 2007, 06:09 PM   #140
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Taiwan is to be congratulated on the construction of such an excellent system. Once again, as a U.S. citizen I find myself envious of the infrastructure being built in another country.
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